Potato

potatoesSolanum tuberosumIrish potatoesboiled potatoesroast potatoesseed potatoSpudtattiesAloonew potato
The potato is a starchy, tuberous crop from the perennial nightshade Solanum tuberosum.wikipedia
3,060 Related Articles

Starch

starcheswheat starchrice starch
The potato is a starchy, tuberous crop from the perennial nightshade Solanum tuberosum.
It is the most common carbohydrate in human diets and is contained in large amounts in staple foods like potatoes, wheat, maize (corn), rice, and cassava.

Solanaceae

nightshadenightshade familysolanaceous
The potato is a starchy, tuberous crop from the perennial nightshade Solanum tuberosum.
Many members of the family contain potent alkaloids, and some are highly toxic, but many—including tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant, bell and chili peppers, and tobacco—are widely used.

List of potato cultivars

Caracultivardifferent types of potatoes
Following millennia of selective breeding, there are now over 1,000 different types of potatoes.
This is a list of potato varieties or cultivars.

Sweet potato

sweet potatoeskumarakūmara
The name originally referred to the sweet potato although the two plants are not closely related.
The sweet potato is only distantly related to the potato (Solanum tuberosum) and does not belong to the nightshade family, Solanaceae, but both families belong to the same taxonomic order, the Solanales.

Solanine

α-solanine
Being a nightshade similar to tomatoes, the vegetative and fruiting parts of the potato contain the toxin solanine and are not fit for human consumption.
Solanine is a glycoalkaloid poison found in species of the nightshade family within the genus Solanum, such as the potato (Solanum tuberosum), the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and the eggplant (Solanum melongena). It can occur naturally in any part of the plant, including the leaves, fruit, and tubers.

Staple food

staplestaplesstaple crop
Today they are a staple food in many parts of the world and an integral part of much of the world's food supply.
Staple foods are derived either from vegetables or animal products, and common staples include cereals (such as rice, wheat, maize, millet, or sorghum), starchy tubers or root vegetables (such as potatoes, cassava, sweet potatoes, yams, or taro), meat, fish, eggs, milk, and cheese.

Seed

seedsseed coatkernel
After flowering, potato plants produce small green fruits that resemble green cherry tomatoes, each containing about 300 seeds.
The term "seed" also has a general meaning that antedates the above – anything that can be sown, e.g. "seed" potatoes, "seeds" of corn or sunflower "seeds".

Potato chip

potato chipscrispschips
Potatoes that are good for making potato chips or potato crisps are sometimes called "chipping potatoes", which means they meet the basic requirements of similar varietal characteristics, being firm, fairly clean, and fairly well-shaped.
Potato chips (often just chips), or crisps, are thin slices of potato that have been deep fried or baked until crunchy.

Tomato

tomatoestomato plantgreen tomato
Being a nightshade similar to tomatoes, the vegetative and fruiting parts of the potato contain the toxin solanine and are not fit for human consumption.
In 1753, Linnaeus placed the tomato in the genus Solanum (alongside the potato) as Solanum lycopersicum.

Potatoes of Chiloé

Chilean potatoChilotan potatoesChiloé
The Andean potato is adapted to the short-day conditions prevalent in the mountainous equatorial and tropical regions where it originated; the Chilean potato, however, native to the Chiloé Archipelago, is adapted to the long-day conditions prevalent in the higher latitude region of southern Chile.
The Chiloé Archipelago is home to a wide variety of potatoes.

Colorado potato beetle

potato beetleColorado beetlespotato beetles
'New Leaf', owned by Monsanto Company, incorporates genes from Bacillus thuringiensis, which confers resistance to the Colorado potato beetle; 'New Leaf Plus' and 'New Leaf Y', approved by US regulatory agencies during the 1990s, also include resistance to viruses.
The Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), also known as the Colorado beetle, the ten-striped spearman, the ten-lined potato beetle or the potato bug, is a major pest of potato crops.

New Zealand English

New ZealandEnglishMaori
Around 1845, the name transferred to the tuber itself, the first record of this usage being in New Zealand English.
The word spud for potato, now common throughout the English-speaking world, originated in New Zealand English.

Crop

cropsfood cropfood crops
The potato is a starchy, tuberous crop from the perennial nightshade Solanum tuberosum.
Globally, the following crops contribute most to human food supply (values of kcal/person/day for 2013 given in parentheses): rice (541 kcal), wheat (527 kcal), sugarcane and other sugar crops (200 kcal), maize (corn) (147 kcal), soybean oil (82 kcal), other vegetables (74 kcal), potatoes (64 kcal), palm oil (52 kcal), cassava (37 kcal), legume pulses (37 kcal), sunflowerseed oil (35 kcal), rape and mustard oil (34 kcal), other fruits, (31 kcal), sorghum (28 kcal), millet (27 kcal), groundnuts (25 kcal), beans (23 kcal), sweet potatoes (22 kcal), bananas (21 kcal), various nuts (16 kcal), soybeans (14 kcal), cottonseed oil (13 kcal), groundnut oil (13 kcal), yams (13 kcal).

Andes

AndeanAndes MountainsAndean region
In the Andes region of South America, where the species is indigenous, some close relatives of the potato are cultivated.
Other important crops that originated from the Andes are tobacco and potatoes.

Phytophthora infestans

potato blightlate blightpotato late blight
Another GM potato variety developed by BASF is 'Fortuna' which was made resistant to late blight by adding two resistance genes, blb1 and blb2, which originate from the Mexican wild potato Solanum bulbocastanum.
Phytophthora infestans is an oomycete or water mold, a microorganism that causes the serious potato and tomato disease known as late blight or potato blight. (Early blight, caused by Alternaria solani, is also often called "potato blight".) Late blight was a major culprit in the 1840s European, the 1845 Irish, and the 1846 Highland potato famines.

European Cultivated Potato Database

The European Cultivated Potato Database (ECPD) is an online collaborative database of potato variety descriptions that is updated and maintained by the Scottish Agricultural Science Agency within the framework of the European Cooperative Programme for Crop Genetic Resources Networks (ECP/GR)—which is run by the International Plant Genetic Resources Institute (IPGRI).
The European Cultivated Potato Database (ECPD) is an online collaborative database of potato variety descriptions.

Maize

corncorn (maize)Zea mays
As of 2014, potatoes were the world's fourth-largest food crop after maize (corn), wheat, and rice.
Maize was the staple food, or a major staple – along with squash, Andean region potato, quinoa, beans, and amaranth – of most pre-Columbian North American, Mesoamerican, South American, and Caribbean cultures.

Amflora

BASF developed the Amflora potato, which was modified to express antisense RNA to inactivate the gene for granule bound starch synthase, an enzyme which catalyzes the formation of amylose.
"Amflora" potato plants produce pure amylopectin starch that is processed to waxy potato starch.

Columbian exchange

occurred with the discovery of the New Worldintroducedadvent of new culinary elements
Following the Spanish conquest of the Inca Empire, the Spanish introduced the potato to Europe in the second half of the 16th century, part of the Columbian exchange.
Traders returned to Europe with maize, potatoes, and tomatoes, which became very important crops in Europe by the 18th century.

Simplot

J. R. Simplot CompanyEdgellSimplot Australia
In November 2014, the USDA approved a genetically modified potato developed by J.R. Simplot Company, which contains genetic modifications that prevent bruising and produce less acrylamide when fried than conventional potatoes; the modifications do not cause new proteins to be made, but rather prevent proteins from being made via RNA interference.
During the early 1940s the business expanded, serving the military dehydrated onions and potatoes during World War II.

Chiloé Archipelago

ChiloéChiloteArchipiélago de Chiloé
The Andean potato is adapted to the short-day conditions prevalent in the mountainous equatorial and tropical regions where it originated; the Chilean potato, however, native to the Chiloé Archipelago, is adapted to the long-day conditions prevalent in the higher latitude region of southern Chile.
The most notable edible plant native to Chiloé is the potato (Solanum tuberosum), which contrary to the Andean potatoes of Peru and Bolivia is adapted to the long-day conditions prevalent in the higher latitudes of southern Chile.

Solanum bulbocastanum

S. bulbocastanum
Another relative native to this region, Solanum bulbocastanum, has been used to genetically engineer the potato to resist potato blight.
It is closely related to the potato and, as it has evolved strong resistance to all known varieties of potato blight, has been used to genetically engineer resistance into the cultivated varieties of potatoes around the world.

King Edward potato

King Edward
The GI of potatoes can vary considerably depending on the cultivar or cultivar category (such as "red", russet, "white", or King Edward), growing conditions and storage, preparation methods (by cooking method, whether it is eaten hot or cold, whether it is mashed or cubed or consumed whole), and accompanying foods consumed (especially the addition of various high-fat or high-protein toppings).
King Edward is a potato variety grown in the UK since 1902, making it one of the oldest varieties still grown commercially.

Waxy potato starch

Waxy potato varieties
Waxy potato varieties produce two main kinds of potato starch, amylose and amylopectin, the latter of which is most industrially useful.
Waxy potato starch is a variety of commercially available starch composed almost entirely of amylopectin molecules, extracted from new potato varieties.

Bolivia

🇧🇴BOLBolivian
In the area of present-day southern Peru and extreme northwestern Bolivia, from a species in the Solanum brevicaule complex, potatoes were domesticated approximately 7,000–10,000 years ago.
Bolivia also naturally produces over 4,000 kinds of potatoes.