Potsdam Agreement

PotsdamTreaty of Potsdamagreedfrontier changesmilitarily and politically driven Potsdam Agreement of 1945after the warAgreement of Potsdaman agreementbecame Polish
The Potsdam Agreement (Potsdamer Abkommen) was the August 1945 agreement between three of the Allies of World War II, the United Kingdom, the United States, and the Soviet Union.wikipedia
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Former eastern territories of Germany

eastern Germanyformer eastern territorieseastern territories
It concerned the military occupation and reconstruction of Germany, its borders, and the entire European Theatre of War territory.
In the Potsdam Agreement the description of the territories transferred is "The former German territories east of the Oder–Neisse line", and permutations on this description are the most commonly used to describe any former territories of Germany east of the Oder–Neisse line.

Council of Foreign Ministers

Foreign Secretary ConferenceLondon Council of Foreign Ministers
Council of Foreign Ministers was an organisation agreed upon at the Potsdam Conference in 1945 and announced in the Potsdam Agreement.

Soviet occupation zone

Soviet Zone of OccupationSoviet ZoneSoviet Zone of occupation in Germany
According to the Potsdam Agreement, the Soviet Military Administration in Germany (German initials: SMAD) was assigned responsibility for the eastern portion of Germany.

Königsberg

Königsberg in PrussiaKönigsberg, PrussiaKöningsberg
The Potsdam Agreement of 1945 placed it provisionally under Soviet administration, as agreed by Winston Churchill and Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Potsdam

Potsdam, GermanyDrewitzMarquardt
In the Three Power Conference of Berlin (formal title of the Potsdam Conference) from 17 July to 2 August 1945, they agreed to and adopted the Protocol of the Proceedings, August 1, 1945, signed at Cecilienhof Castle in Potsdam.
The conference ended with the Potsdam Agreement and the Potsdam Declaration.

World War II reparations

German reparations for World War IIwar reparationsreparations
It also addressed Germany's demilitarisation, reparations and the prosecution of war criminals.
After German reunification in 1990, Poland demanded reparations again, as a reaction to claims made by German refugee organizations demanding compensation for property and land repossessed by the new Polish state that they were forcibly deported from as stipulated in the Potsdam Agreement and the aforementioned Oder-Neisse border.

Berlin Declaration (1945)

Berlin DeclarationDeclaration Regarding the Defeat of Germany1945 Berlin Declaration
After the end of World War II in Europe (1939–45), and the decisions of the earlier Tehran, Casablanca and Yalta Conferences, the Allies by the Berlin Declaration of June 5, 1945, had assumed supreme authority over Germany.
Under the terms of the Potsdam Agreement, the Allies stated their intention that the exercise of full German sovereignty by the Allied Control Council would be one of tutelage and of limited duration; the Council of Foreign Ministers being tasked with preparing the terms for an eventual Peace Treaty and final settlement of the War, and with establishing through the Control Council a wholly new German Government and state adequate for the purpose of accepting that settlement.

Vienna

Vienna, AustriaWienViennese
The Potsdam Agreement included written rights of land access to the western sectors, whereas no such written guarantees had covered the western sectors of Berlin.

End of World War II in Europe

1945end of the war in Europeend of the war
After the end of World War II in Europe (1939–45), and the decisions of the earlier Tehran, Casablanca and Yalta Conferences, the Allies by the Berlin Declaration of June 5, 1945, had assumed supreme authority over Germany.
The Potsdam Agreement was signed on 12 August 1945.

Treaty on the Final Settlement with Respect to Germany

Two Plus Four AgreementTwo Plus Four TreatyTwo Plus Four
It was superseded by the Treaty on the Final Settlement with Respect to Germany signed on 12 September 1990.
On 2 August 1945, the Potsdam Agreement, promulgated at the end of the Potsdam Conference, among other things agreed on the initial terms under which the Allies of World War II would govern Germany.

Allied Control Council

Four PowersAlliedAllied Control Commission
The Potsdam Agreement of 2 August 1945 further specified the tasks of the Control Council.

Flight and expulsion of Germans (1944–1950)

expelledexpulsion of Germans after World War IIexpulsion of Germans
The third phase was a more organised expulsion following the Allied leaders' Potsdam Agreement, which redefined the Central European borders and approved expulsions of ethnic Germans from the former German territories transferred to Poland, Russia and Czechoslovakia.

Allied-occupied Austria

AustriaAllied occupationAllied occupation of Austria
The Potsdam Agreement allowed confiscation of "German external assets" in Austria, and the Soviets used the vagueness of this definition to the full.

Denazification

de-NazificationdenazifiedDefunct
The program of denazification was launched after the end of the Second World War and was solidified by the Potsdam Agreement in August 1945.

Yalta Conference

YaltaYalta Agreementalready agreed
After the end of World War II in Europe (1939–45), and the decisions of the earlier Tehran, Casablanca and Yalta Conferences, the Allies by the Berlin Declaration of June 5, 1945, had assumed supreme authority over Germany.
The conference resulted in (1) the Potsdam Declaration regarding the surrender of Japan, and (2) the Potsdam Agreement regarding the Soviet annexation of former Polish territory east of the Curzon Line, and, provisions, to be addressed in an eventual Final Treaty ending World War II, for the annexation of parts of Germany east of the Oder-Neisse line into Poland, and northern East Prussia into the Soviet Union.

East Germany

East GermanGerman Democratic RepublicGDR
It consisted of territory that was administered and occupied by Soviet forces at the end of World War II — the Soviet occupation zone of the Potsdam Agreement, bounded on the east by the Oder–Neisse line.

Oder–Neisse line

Oder-Neisse lineOder-Neiße linefrontier changes
Urged by Stalin, the UK and the US gave in to put the German territories east of the Oder–Neisse line from the Baltic coast west of Świnoujście up to the Czechoslovak border "under Polish administration"; allegedly confusing the Lusatian Neisse and the Glatzer Neisse rivers.
Finally on 2 August 1945, the Potsdam Agreement of the United States, the United Kingdom, and the Soviet Union, in anticipation of the final peace treaty, placed the German territories east of the Oder–Neisse line formally under Polish administrative control.

Czechoslovakia

CzechoslovakCzechCzechoslovakian
Urged by Stalin, the UK and the US gave in to put the German territories east of the Oder–Neisse line from the Baltic coast west of Świnoujście up to the Czechoslovak border "under Polish administration"; allegedly confusing the Lusatian Neisse and the Glatzer Neisse rivers.
The Beneš decrees were promulgated concerning ethnic Germans (see Potsdam Agreement) and ethnic Hungarians.

West Germany

West GermanFederal Republic of GermanyGermany
By the subsequent Potsdam Agreement, the four Allied Powers asserted joint sovereignty over 'Germany as a whole', defined as the totality of the territory within the occupation zones.

Szczecin

StettinSzczecin, PolandStettin (Szczecin)
The cession included the former Free City of Danzig and the seaport of Stettin on the mouth of the Oder River (Szczecin Lagoon), vital for the Upper Silesian Industrial Region.
Following World War II Stettin became part of Poland in accordance with the Potsdam Agreement, resulting in the almost complete expulsion of the pre-war population.

Free City of Danzig

DanzigLeague of Nations High Commissioner for DanzigFree City of Gdańsk
The cession included the former Free City of Danzig and the seaport of Stettin on the mouth of the Oder River (Szczecin Lagoon), vital for the Upper Silesian Industrial Region.
In 1945, the city officially became part of Poland in accordance with the Potsdam Agreement.

Province of Silesia

SilesiaPrussian SilesiaSilesia Province
Upon the implementation of the Oder-Neisse line according to the 1945 Potsdam Agreement, most of the Prussian Silesia Province became part of Poland, incorporated into the Lubusz, Lower Silesian, Opole and Silesian Voivodeships.

Allied Commission

Allied Control CommissionAllied Commission for AustriaControl Commission
The French had been excluded (at American insistence) from the Potsdam Conference and consequently refused to recognise any obligation for the ACC to be constrained by the Potsdam agreement.

Lusatian Neisse

NeisseNeisse RiverNeiße
Urged by Stalin, the UK and the US gave in to put the German territories east of the Oder–Neisse line from the Baltic coast west of Świnoujście up to the Czechoslovak border "under Polish administration"; allegedly confusing the Lusatian Neisse and the Glatzer Neisse rivers.
According to the 1945 Potsdam Agreement in the aftermath of World War II, the river became part of the Polish western border with Germany (the Oder-Neisse line).

Paris Peace Treaties, 1947

Paris Peace TreatiesParis Peace ConferenceParis Peace Treaty