A report on Poultry

Poultry of the World (c. 1868)
Cock with comb and wattles
Roman mosaic depicting a cockfight
Pekin ducks
An Emden goose, a descendant of the wild greylag goose
Male domesticated turkey sexually displaying by showing the snood hanging over the beak, the caruncles hanging from the throat, and the 'beard' of small, black, stiff feathers on the chest
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Hens in battery cages can not move freely, with several birds living in a single cage.
Chicken and duck eggs on sale in Hong Kong
In the poultry pavilion of the Rungis International Market, France
Cuts from plucked chickens

Poultry are domesticated birds kept by humans for their eggs, their meat or their feathers.

- Poultry
Poultry of the World (c. 1868)

23 related topics with Alpha

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Domestic turkey

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Large fowl, one of the two species in the genus Meleagris and the same species as the wild turkey.

Large fowl, one of the two species in the genus Meleagris and the same species as the wild turkey.

Ceramic whistle in the shape of a turkey. Colima shaft tomb culture, 200 B.C. – A.D. 500
Black Spanish turkeys
A baby turkey is called a poult
Anatomical structures on the head and throat of a domestic turkey. 1. Caruncles, 2. Snood, 3. Wattle (Dewlap), 4. Major Caruncle, 5. Beard
Male domestic turkey sexually displaying by showing the snood hanging over the beak, the caruncles hanging from the throat, and the 'beard' of small, black, stiff feathers on the chest
A domestic turkey taken as a pet
Turkey in Pakistan
Modern domestic turkeys under commercial conditions
A roast turkey prepared for a traditional U.S. Thanksgiving meal
Roast turkey

The domestic turkey is a popular form of poultry, and it is raised throughout temperate parts of the world, partially because industrialized farming has made it very cheap for the amount of meat it produces.

Whole chickens for sale in a public market, Mazatlan, Sinaloa, Mexico

Chicken as food

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Whole chickens for sale in a public market, Mazatlan, Sinaloa, Mexico
The United States Department of Agriculture classifies cuts of poultry in a manner similar to beef.
Oven-roasted rosemary and lemon chicken.
Buffalo wings, invented in Buffalo, New York, are chicken wings that are generally deep-fried then coated or dipped in a sauce. They are now a staple in the cuisine of the United States.
A poussin, or juvenile chicken
A box of five chicken wings, served at a Hesburger fast food restaurant in Helsinki, Finland.
Chicken wings being barbecued
Fried chicken
Marination of chicken
Roasted chicken with vegetable chowder sauce
Chicken with mushrooms, tomatoes and spices
Oven roasted chicken with potatoes
Chicken tikka masala, adapted from Indian chicken tikka and called "a true British national dish." The dish is now popular staple in Indian restaurants worldwide.<ref name=GuardianMasala>{{cite news |url=http://www.theguardian.com/world/2001/apr/19/race.britishidentity |title=Robin Cook's chicken tikka masala speech |newspaper=The Guardian |access-date=19 April 2001 | date=25 February 2002 | location=London}}</ref>
A chicken curry from Maharashtra, India with rice flour chapatis. The dish is popular worldwide.<ref name="Sen2009">{{cite book|author=Colleen Taylor Sen|title=Curry: A Global History|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=94tRvbuCqWcC|date=15 November 2009|publisher=Reaktion Books|isbn=978-1-86189-704-6}}</ref>
Peking chicken from the Philippines
Butter chicken from India
A meal consisting of chicken served with carrots and rice.
thumb|Chicken sizzler is served on high temperature in heavy wood utensils.

Chicken is the most common type of poultry in the world.

Archaeopteryx lithographica is often considered the oldest known true bird.

Bird

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Birds are a group of warm-blooded vertebrates constituting the class Aves, characterised by feathers, toothless beaked jaws, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, a high metabolic rate, a four-chambered heart, and a strong yet lightweight skeleton.

Birds are a group of warm-blooded vertebrates constituting the class Aves, characterised by feathers, toothless beaked jaws, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, a high metabolic rate, a four-chambered heart, and a strong yet lightweight skeleton.

Archaeopteryx lithographica is often considered the oldest known true bird.
Anchiornis huxleyi is an important source of information on the early evolution of birds in the Late Jurassic period.
Simplified phylogenetic tree showing the relationship between modern birds and dinosaurs
Confuciusornis sanctus, a Cretaceous bird from China that lived 125 million years ago, is the oldest known bird to have a beak.
Ichthyornis, which lived 93 million years ago, was the first known prehistoric bird relative preserved with teeth.
The range of the house sparrow has expanded dramatically due to human activities.
External anatomy of a bird (example: yellow-wattled lapwing): 1 Beak, 2 Head, 3 Iris, 4 Pupil, 5 Mantle, 6 Lesser coverts, 7 Scapulars, 8 Median coverts, 9 Tertials, 10 Rump, 11 Primaries, 12 Vent, 13 Thigh, 14 Tibio-tarsal articulation, 15 Tarsus, 16 Foot, 17 Tibia, 18 Belly, 19 Flanks, 20 Breast, 21 Throat, 22 Wattle, 23 Eyestripe
Didactic model of an avian heart
The nictitating membrane as it covers the eye of a masked lapwing
The disruptively patterned plumage of the African scops owl allows it to blend in with its surroundings.
Red lory preening
Restless flycatcher in the downstroke of flapping flight
Feeding adaptations in beaks
A flock of Canada geese in V formation
The routes of satellite-tagged bar-tailed godwits migrating north from New Zealand. This species has the longest known non-stop migration of any species, up to 10200 km.
The startling display of the sunbittern mimics a large predator.
Red-billed queleas, the most numerous species of wild bird, form enormous flocks – sometimes tens of thousands strong.
Many birds, like this American flamingo, tuck their head into their back when sleeping.
Like others of its family, the male Raggiana bird-of-paradise has elaborate breeding plumage used to impress females.
Male golden-backed weavers construct elaborate suspended nests out of grass.
Nest of an eastern phoebe that has been parasitised by a brown-headed cowbird
A female calliope hummingbird feeding fully grown chicks
Altricial chicks of a white-breasted woodswallow
Reed warbler raising a common cuckoo, a brood parasite
The peacock tail in flight, the classic example of a Fisherian runaway
Gran Canaria blue chaffinch, an example of a bird highly specialised in its habitat, in this case in the Canarian pine forests
Industrial farming of chickens
The use of cormorants by Asian fishermen is in steep decline but survives in some areas as a tourist attraction.
The 3 of Birds by the Master of the Playing Cards, 15th-century Germany
Painted tiles with design of birds from Qajar dynasty
The California condor once numbered only 22 birds, but conservation measures have raised that to over 500 today.

Many species of birds are economically important as food for human consumption and raw material in manufacturing, with domesticated and undomesticated birds being important sources of eggs, meat, and feathers.

A selection of uncooked red meat and poultry

Meat

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Animal flesh that is eaten as food.

Animal flesh that is eaten as food.

A selection of uncooked red meat and poultry
A typical shoulder cut of lamb
A Hereford bull, a breed of cattle frequently used in beef production.
Dog meat sold at Gyeongdong Market, Seoul, South Korea
Fresh meat in a supermarket in North America
Blade steaks are an example of "red" meat
A slaughterhouse of the meat company Atria in Seinäjoki, South Ostrobothnia, Finland
In the meat products sector of the Rungis International Market, France.
The word "sausage" is derived from Old French saussiche, from the Latin word salsus meaning "salted".
Cereal-use statistic showing an estimated large fraction of crops used as fodder
Meat production is a main driver of tropical deforestation, in the Amazon largely due to beef production/exports
Life-cycle assessment of GHG emissions for foods – beef is the food with the largest carbon footprint, mainly due to methane production from cows
A spit barbecue at a street fair in New York City's East Village.
Pork ribs being smoked
Sautéed reindeer with mashed potatoes, lingonberry and gherkin.
Risk of 25 common conditions per >70g/day daily intake of unprocessed red and processed meat according to a study using UK Biobank data.
Risk of ischemic heart disease for each 50 g per day increase in processed meat consumption

Meat is sometimes also used in a more restrictive sense to mean the flesh of mammalian species (pigs, cattle, sheep, goats, etc.) raised and prepared for human consumption, to the exclusion of fish, other seafood, insects, poultry, or other animals.

Feather pecking amongst laying hens. In the lower right of the picture, the white hen has lost her tail feathers and the brown hen has been feather pecked on the thigh and wing.

Feather pecking

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Feather pecking amongst laying hens. In the lower right of the picture, the white hen has lost her tail feathers and the brown hen has been feather pecked on the thigh and wing.
Blinders for poultry - From the U.S. Patent "Device to prevent picking in poultry" filed in 1935

Feather pecking is a behavioural problem that occurs most frequently amongst domestic hens reared for egg production, although it does occur in other poultry such as pheasants, turkeys, ducks, broiler chickens and is sometimes seen in farmed ostriches.

An adult bird which has been beak-trimmed as a chick.

Debeaking

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An adult bird which has been beak-trimmed as a chick.
Laws regarding beak trimming around the world.
Nationwide ban on beak trimming
Some subnational bans on beak trimming
Beak trimming legal
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Debeaking, beak trimming (also spelt beak-trimming ), or beak conditioning is the partial removal of the beak of poultry, especially layer hens and turkeys although it may also be performed on quail and ducks.

Bank of cages for layer hens

Poultry farming

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Bank of cages for layer hens
Poultry farm in South Africa, showing black terrain in foreground after controlled burn to stimulate new growth of nutritious grass
Baby free range chicken in Ishwarganj Upazila, Mymensingh, Bangladesh
Commercial free range hens in the Scottish Borders
Free range chickens being fed outdoors
Poultry farm using battery cages in India
Broilers in a production house
Turkeys on pasture at an organic farm
Battery cages
Chickens transported in a truck
Roxarsone, a controversial arsenic compound used as a nutritional supplement for chickens.
Chicken coop in Ghana

Poultry farming is the form of animal husbandry which raises domesticated birds such as chickens, ducks, turkeys and geese to produce meat or eggs for food.

Fowl

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Fowl are birds belonging to one of two biological orders, namely the gamefowl or landfowl (Galliformes) and the waterfowl (Anseriformes).

Fowl are birds belonging to one of two biological orders, namely the gamefowl or landfowl (Galliformes) and the waterfowl (Anseriformes).

As opposed to "fowl", "poultry" is a term for any kind of domesticated bird or bird captive-raised for meat, eggs, or feathers; ostriches, for example, are sometimes kept as poultry, but are neither gamefowl nor waterfowl.

Pollotarianism

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Pollotarianism is the practice of adhering to a diet that incorporates poultry as the only source of meat in an otherwise vegetarian diet.

A female Mallard duck incubates her eggs

Egg incubation

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Process by which an egg, of oviparous animals, develops an embryo within the egg, after the egg's formation and ovipositional release.

Process by which an egg, of oviparous animals, develops an embryo within the egg, after the egg's formation and ovipositional release.

A female Mallard duck incubates her eggs

Especially in poultry, the act of sitting on eggs to incubate them is called brooding.