Powers of the president of the United States

at the pleasure of the PresidentCommander-in-Chiefexecutive powerat his pleasurecommander in chiefDuringexecutive powersnational emergencypowers and dutiespresident's constitutional power
The powers of the president of the United States include those powers explicitly granted by Article II of the United States Constitution to the president of the United States, powers granted by Acts of Congress, implied powers, and also a great deal of soft power that is attached to the presidency.wikipedia
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President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
The powers of the president of the United States include those powers explicitly granted by Article II of the United States Constitution to the president of the United States, powers granted by Acts of Congress, implied powers, and also a great deal of soft power that is attached to the presidency.
The president directs the executive branch of the federal government and is the commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces.

United States Armed Forces

United States militaryU.S. militaryUS military
The Constitution explicitly assigns the president the power to sign or veto legislation, command the armed forces, ask for the written opinion of their Cabinet, convene or adjourn Congress, grant reprieves and pardons, and receive ambassadors. Article II of the Constitution expressly designates the president as "Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States" – since 1947, this has been understood to mean all U.S. Armed Forces.
The president of the United States is the commander-in-chief of the Armed Forces and forms military policy with the Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS), both federal executive departments, acting as the principal organs by which military policy is carried out.

Cabinet of the United States

Cabinetcabinet secretaryUnited States Cabinet
The Constitution explicitly assigns the president the power to sign or veto legislation, command the armed forces, ask for the written opinion of their Cabinet, convene or adjourn Congress, grant reprieves and pardons, and receive ambassadors.
Members of the Cabinet (except for the vice president) are appointed by the President, subject to confirmation by the Senate; once confirmed, they serve at the pleasure of the president, who can dismiss them at any time without the approval of the Senate, as affirmed by the Supreme Court in Myers v. United States (1926).

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

ChairmanChairman of the Joint ChiefsChairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff
The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the combatant commands assist with the operation as outlined in the presidentially approved Unified Command Plan (UCP).
The Chairman serves a single four-year term of office at the pleasure of the President, with reappointment to additional terms only possible during times of war or national emergency.

Power (social and political)

powerpolitical powerpowers
The powers of the president of the United States include those powers explicitly granted by Article II of the United States Constitution to the president of the United States, powers granted by Acts of Congress, implied powers, and also a great deal of soft power that is attached to the presidency.

Article Two of the United States Constitution

Article IIArticle TwoArticle II, Section 1, Clause 6
The powers of the president of the United States include those powers explicitly granted by Article II of the United States Constitution to the president of the United States, powers granted by Acts of Congress, implied powers, and also a great deal of soft power that is attached to the presidency. Article II of the Constitution expressly designates the president as "Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States" – since 1947, this has been understood to mean all U.S. Armed Forces.

Constitution of the United States

United States ConstitutionU.S. ConstitutionConstitution
The powers of the president of the United States include those powers explicitly granted by Article II of the United States Constitution to the president of the United States, powers granted by Acts of Congress, implied powers, and also a great deal of soft power that is attached to the presidency.

Act of Congress

Public LawactActs of Congress
The powers of the president of the United States include those powers explicitly granted by Article II of the United States Constitution to the president of the United States, powers granted by Acts of Congress, implied powers, and also a great deal of soft power that is attached to the presidency.

Implied powers

implied powerimplied authoritypowers that were not expressly defined
The powers of the president of the United States include those powers explicitly granted by Article II of the United States Constitution to the president of the United States, powers granted by Acts of Congress, implied powers, and also a great deal of soft power that is attached to the presidency.

Soft power

soft diplomacypoliticallysoft
The powers of the president of the United States include those powers explicitly granted by Article II of the United States Constitution to the president of the United States, powers granted by Acts of Congress, implied powers, and also a great deal of soft power that is attached to the presidency.

Legislative veto in the United States

legislative vetoINS v. Chadha (1983)veto legislation
The Constitution explicitly assigns the president the power to sign or veto legislation, command the armed forces, ask for the written opinion of their Cabinet, convene or adjourn Congress, grant reprieves and pardons, and receive ambassadors.

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
The Constitution explicitly assigns the president the power to sign or veto legislation, command the armed forces, ask for the written opinion of their Cabinet, convene or adjourn Congress, grant reprieves and pardons, and receive ambassadors.

Treaty Clause

treatiestreatycan be overturned by a future elected President
The president may make treaties, which need to be ratified by two-thirds of the Senate, and is accorded those foreign-affairs functions not otherwise granted to Congress or shared with the Senate.

United States Senate

U.S. SenatorUnited States SenatorU.S. Senate
The president may make treaties, which need to be ratified by two-thirds of the Senate, and is accorded those foreign-affairs functions not otherwise granted to Congress or shared with the Senate.

Federal tribunals in the United States

Article III judgesArticle I and Article III tribunalsArticle III judge
The president may also appoint Article III judges and some officers with the advice and consent of the U.S. Senate.

Advice and consent

confirmedSenate confirmationconfirmation
The president may also appoint Article III judges and some officers with the advice and consent of the U.S. Senate.

Recess appointment

recess appointedrecess-appointedrecess appointments
In the condition of a Senate recess, the president may make a temporary appointment.

Commander-in-chief

Commander in ChiefSupreme CommanderC-in-C
Article II of the Constitution expressly designates the president as "Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States" – since 1947, this has been understood to mean all U.S. Armed Forces.

Militia (United States)

militiastate militiaIllinois Militia
Article II of the Constitution expressly designates the president as "Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States" – since 1947, this has been understood to mean all U.S. Armed Forces.

Military operation

operationsmilitary operationsoperation
As commander-in-chief, the president exercises supreme operational command over the military; which includes the power to launch, direct and supervise military operations, order or authorize the deployment of troops (in foreign countries), and form military policy with the Department of Defense and Homeland Security.

United States Department of Defense

Department of DefenseU.S. Department of DefenseUS Department of Defense
As commander-in-chief, the president exercises supreme operational command over the military; which includes the power to launch, direct and supervise military operations, order or authorize the deployment of troops (in foreign countries), and form military policy with the Department of Defense and Homeland Security.

United States Department of Homeland Security

Department of Homeland SecurityU.S. Department of Homeland SecurityHomeland Security
As commander-in-chief, the president exercises supreme operational command over the military; which includes the power to launch, direct and supervise military operations, order or authorize the deployment of troops (in foreign countries), and form military policy with the Department of Defense and Homeland Security.

Declaration of war by the United States

declaration of wardeclared wardeclare war
However, the constitutional ability to declare war is vested only in Congress.

United States Secretary of War

Secretary of WarU.S. Secretary of WarUS Secretary of War
Before 1947, the president was the only common superior of the Army (under the secretary of war) and the Navy and Marine Corps (under the secretary of the navy).

United States Department of the Navy

Department of the NavyNavy DepartmentUnited States Naval Service
Before 1947, the president was the only common superior of the Army (under the secretary of war) and the Navy and Marine Corps (under the secretary of the navy).