Prague Slavic Congress, 1848

Prague Slavic CongressPan-Slavic CongressSlavic CongressFirst Pan-Slav congressFirst Congress of the Pan-Slavic MovementPan-Slav CongressPrague Slavic CongreeSlavic Congress at PragueSlavic Congress in Prague in June 1848
The Prague Slavic Congress of 1848 (Slovanský sjezd, Slovanský zjazd/kongres) took place in Prague between 2 June and 12 June 1848.wikipedia
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František Palacký

PalackýFrantiška Palackého
The initiative came from Pavel Jozef Šafárik and Josip Jelačić, but was organized by Czech activists František Palacký, Karl Zapp, Karel Havlíček Borovský, and František Ladislav Rieger.
In early June oversaw the Slavic Congress at Prague as its president.

Pavel Jozef Šafárik

ŠafárikP. J. ŠafárikP. Šafárik
The initiative came from Pavel Jozef Šafárik and Josip Jelačić, but was organized by Czech activists František Palacký, Karl Zapp, Karel Havlíček Borovský, and František Ladislav Rieger.
The reason for this resignation was that during the Revolution of 1848-49 he participated at the Slavic Congress in Prague in June 1848 and thus became suspicious for Austrian authorities.

Ľudovít Štúr

ŠtúrLjudevit ŠturLudovit Stur
Dr. Josef Frič argued that the “primary goal is the preservation of Austria”, adding that the Congress “only differs on the means.” This point was disputed by Ľudovít Štúr who told the Congress, “our goal is self-preservation”.
On 1 April 1848 in Vienna, Štúr and his colleagues prepared the Slavic Congress of Prague.

Pavle Stamatović

Pavo Stamatović
Pavo Stamatović, Serbian, chairman of the South Slavs.
He chaired the delegation of South Slavs at the Prague Slavic Congress, 1848.

Supreme Ruthenian Council

Galician Ruthenians (native pronunciation Rusyns, modern Ukrainians) were represented by the political organizations Supreme Ruthenian Council and Ruthenian sobor.
Three members of the organization attended the Prague Slavic Congree in June 1848.

Jovan Subotić

Jovan Subotić, Serbian poet, lawyer and politician.
In 1848 he was sent as a delegate to attend the Prague Slavic Congress, 1848, a culmination of the initial phase of Pan-Slav cultural collaboration in the Habsburg Empire.

Prague

PrahaPrague, Czech RepublicPrag
The Prague Slavic Congress of 1848 (Slovanský sjezd, Slovanský zjazd/kongres) took place in Prague between 2 June and 12 June 1848.

Slavs

SlavicSlavSlavonic
It was the first occasion on which voices from all Slav populations of Europe were heard in one place.

Josip Jelačić

JelačićBan Josip JelačićBan Jelačić
The initiative came from Pavel Jozef Šafárik and Josip Jelačić, but was organized by Czech activists František Palacký, Karl Zapp, Karel Havlíček Borovský, and František Ladislav Rieger.

Karel Havlíček Borovský

HavličekHavlíčekK. H. Borovský
The initiative came from Pavel Jozef Šafárik and Josip Jelačić, but was organized by Czech activists František Palacký, Karl Zapp, Karel Havlíček Borovský, and František Ladislav Rieger.

František Ladislav Rieger

František RiegerRiegrův
The initiative came from Pavel Jozef Šafárik and Josip Jelačić, but was organized by Czech activists František Palacký, Karl Zapp, Karel Havlíček Borovský, and František Ladislav Rieger.

Poles

PolishPoleethnic Poles
Once underway, the conference met in three sections: Poles and Ukrainians (at that time Ruthenians); South Slavs; and Czecho-Slovaks.

Ukrainians

UkrainianUkraineethnic Ukrainians
Galician Ruthenians (native pronunciation Rusyns, modern Ukrainians) were represented by the political organizations Supreme Ruthenian Council and Ruthenian sobor. Once underway, the conference met in three sections: Poles and Ukrainians (at that time Ruthenians); South Slavs; and Czecho-Slovaks.

South Slavs

South SlavicSlavicSouth Slav
Once underway, the conference met in three sections: Poles and Ukrainians (at that time Ruthenians); South Slavs; and Czecho-Slovaks.

Czechs

CzechBohemianCzech people
Once underway, the conference met in three sections: Poles and Ukrainians (at that time Ruthenians); South Slavs; and Czecho-Slovaks.

Slovaks

SlovakSlovakianSlovakians
Once underway, the conference met in three sections: Poles and Ukrainians (at that time Ruthenians); South Slavs; and Czecho-Slovaks.

Ruthenians

RuthenianRusynsRuthenes
Once underway, the conference met in three sections: Poles and Ukrainians (at that time Ruthenians); South Slavs; and Czecho-Slovaks. The Pole-Ukrainian section contained a combination of Ruthenes, Mazurians, Greater Poles, and Lithuanians.

Masurians

MazurMasurianMazurs
The Pole-Ukrainian section contained a combination of Ruthenes, Mazurians, Greater Poles, and Lithuanians.

Greater Poland

PolandWielkopolskaGreater Polish
The Pole-Ukrainian section contained a combination of Ruthenes, Mazurians, Greater Poles, and Lithuanians.

Lithuanians

Lithuanianethnic LithuaniansLithuania
The Pole-Ukrainian section contained a combination of Ruthenes, Mazurians, Greater Poles, and Lithuanians.

Whitsun

WhitWhit MondayWhit Sunday
This later became known as the Whitsuntide events because of the timing during the Christian holiday of Pentecost.

Pentecost

WhitsundayDay of PentecostWhit Sunday
This later became known as the Whitsuntide events because of the timing during the Christian holiday of Pentecost.

History of Austria

Second RepublicAustriaAustrian history
The delegates left in disgust and some were even arrested because of the revolutionary nature of the Congress which marked a period in the history of Austria as the Bach's absolutism (after the Interior Minister Baron Alexander von Bach).

Austrian Empire

AustrianAustriaAustrians
The delegates left in disgust and some were even arrested because of the revolutionary nature of the Congress which marked a period in the history of Austria as the Bach's absolutism (after the Interior Minister Baron Alexander von Bach). During the Congress, there was debate about the role of Austria in the lives of the Slavs.

Baron Alexander von Bach

Alexander von BachBachBachovský Government
The delegates left in disgust and some were even arrested because of the revolutionary nature of the Congress which marked a period in the history of Austria as the Bach's absolutism (after the Interior Minister Baron Alexander von Bach).