Pratt & Whitney F119

F119Pratt & Whitney YF119F-22F119 jet enginePratt & Whitney F119-PW-100
The Pratt & Whitney F119, company designation PW5000, is an afterburning turbofan engine developed by Pratt & Whitney for the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor advanced tactical fighter.wikipedia
41 Related Articles

Turbofan

high-bypass turbofanturbofan engineturbofans
The Pratt & Whitney F119, company designation PW5000, is an afterburning turbofan engine developed by Pratt & Whitney for the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor advanced tactical fighter.
Current low-bypass military turbofans include the Pratt & Whitney F119, the Eurojet EJ200, the General Electric F110, the Klimov RD-33, and the Saturn AL-31, all of which feature a mixed exhaust, afterburner and variable area propelling nozzle.

Pratt & Whitney

P&WPratt & Whitney Aircraft CompanyPratt and Whitney
The Pratt & Whitney F119, company designation PW5000, is an afterburning turbofan engine developed by Pratt & Whitney for the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor advanced tactical fighter.
Pratt & Whitney military engines include the F135 for the F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF), the F119 for the F-22 Raptor, the F100 family that powers the F-15 Eagle and F-16 Falcon, the F117 for the C-17 Globemaster III, the J52 for the EA-6B Prowler, the TF33 powering E-3 AWACS, E-8 Joint STARS, B-52, and KC-135 aircraft, and the TF30 for the F-111 and F-14A.

Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II

F-35 Lightning IIF-35F-35B Lightning II
The F119 derivative, the Pratt & Whitney F135, produces up to 43000 lbf of thrust for the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II.
Like the Pratt & Whitney F119 from which it was derived, the F135 has suffered afterburner pressure pulsations, or 'screech' at low altitude and high speed.

Pratt & Whitney F135

F135F135 engineF-135
The F119 derivative, the Pratt & Whitney F135, produces up to 43000 lbf of thrust for the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II.
Developed from the Pratt & Whitney F119 engine used on the F-22 Raptor, the F135 produces around 40,000 lbf of thrust.

Supercruise

Supersonic cruisecruise efficiently at supersonic speedscruising supersonically
The engine delivers thrust in the 35000 lbf class, and is designed for supercruise.

Thrust vectoring

vectored thrustthrust vector controlthrust vector
The F119's nozzles incorporate 2D thrust vectoring technology.
Widespread use of thrust vectoring for enhanced maneuverability in Western production-model fighter aircraft didn't occur until the deployment of the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor fifth-generation jet fighter in 2005, with its afterburning, 2D thrust-vectoring Pratt & Whitney F119 turbofan.

Pratt & Whitney F100

F100F100-PW-200F100-PW-229
Delivering almost 22% more thrust with 40% fewer parts than its F100 predecessor, the F119 allows sustained supercruise speeds of up to Mach 1.8. Advances in engine technology, such as those from the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) program, allowed the design to do more work with fewer stages, with the PW5000 having only 6 compressor stages compared to the F100's 10 compressor stages.
Using technology developed from the F119 and F135 engine programs for the F-22 Raptor and F-35 Lightning II, the current production F100-PW-229 EEP (Engine Enhancement Package) incorporates modern turbine materials, cooling management techniques, compressor aerodynamics, and electronic controls.

General Electric YF120

YF120
Pratt & Whitney and General Electric were selected to make prototype engines, designated YF119 and YF120 respectively, for demonstration and validation.
Pratt & Whitney's competing F119 was selected over the YF120 to power the ATF, which became the F-22 Raptor.

Advanced Tactical Fighter

Navy Advanced Tactical FighterAdvanced Tactical Fighters
The F119 resulted from the Joint Advanced Fighter Engine (JAFE) program in the early 1980s aimed at supplying the powerplant for the Air Force's Advanced Tactical Fighter (ATF).
Two examples of each prototype were built for the Demonstration-Validation phase: one with General Electric YF120 engines, the other with Pratt & Whitney YF119 engines.

Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor

F-22 RaptorF-22F-22A Raptor
The Pratt & Whitney F119, company designation PW5000, is an afterburning turbofan engine developed by Pratt & Whitney for the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor advanced tactical fighter.
The aircraft's dual Pratt & Whitney F119-PW-100 augmented turbofan engines are closely spaced and incorporate pitch-axis thrust vectoring nozzles with a range of ±20 degrees; each engine has maximum thrust in the 35,000 lbf (156 kN) class.

Lockheed YF-22

YF-22YF-22AYF-22 Raptor
Two examples of each prototype air vehicle (PAV) were built for the Demonstration-Validation phase: one with General Electric YF120 engines, the other with Pratt & Whitney YF119 engines.

Northrop YF-23

YF-23YF-23 Black Widow IIYF-23A
Of the two aircraft built, the first YF-23 (PAV-1) was fitted with Pratt & Whitney YF119 engines, while the second (PAV-2) was powered by General Electric YF120 engines.

Lockheed Martin X-35

X-35X-35BLockheed Martin X-35B
Both the Boeing X-32 and X-35 power plants were derived from Pratt & Whitney's F119, with the STOVL variant of the latter incorporating a Rolls-Royce Lift Fan module.

Afterburner

afterburningreheatafterburners
The Pratt & Whitney F119, company designation PW5000, is an afterburning turbofan engine developed by Pratt & Whitney for the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor advanced tactical fighter.

Lockheed Martin

Lockheed Martin CorporationLockheed-MartinLockheed
The Pratt & Whitney F119, company designation PW5000, is an afterburning turbofan engine developed by Pratt & Whitney for the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor advanced tactical fighter.

Flight dynamics

rollpitchyaw
These nozzles direct the engine thrust ±20° in the pitch axis to give the F-22 enhanced maneuverability.

Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology

Advances in engine technology, such as those from the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) program, allowed the design to do more work with fewer stages, with the PW5000 having only 6 compressor stages compared to the F100's 10 compressor stages.

Work (physics)

workmechanical workwork-energy theorem
Advances in engine technology, such as those from the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) program, allowed the design to do more work with fewer stages, with the PW5000 having only 6 compressor stages compared to the F100's 10 compressor stages.

Turbine

turbinesrotorturbine engines
The high pressure and low pressure turbines were single stage and counter-rotating, thus shortening the engine by removing a row of stators and saving weight.

Blisk

Integrally bladed rotorintegrally bladed rotors
The fan and compressor stages were to use integrally bladed rotors (IBR) to reduce weight and cost and improve performance.

General Electric

GEGeneral Electric CompanyGeneral Electric Co.
Pratt & Whitney and General Electric were selected to make prototype engines, designated YF119 and YF120 respectively, for demonstration and validation.

Friction welding

friction weldedLinear friction weldingFriction
The shroud-less fan has wide-chord hollow titanium fan blades that are linear-friction welded to the disk.

Superalloy

superalloysadvanced metal alloyssuper alloy
The compressor stators and thrust-vectoring nozzle use burn-resistant titanium alloy called Alloy C. The high-pressure turbine blades are made of single-crystal superalloys and impingement cooled using air from the high-pressure compressor.

Radiation-absorbent material

radar-absorbent materialradar absorbent materialiron ball paint
The three-zone afterburner, or augmentor, contributes to the stealth of the aircraft by having fuel injectors integrated into thick curved vanes coated with ceramic radar-absorbent materials (RAM).