Predatory publishing

Predatory open access publishingpredatory journalspredatory open-access publisherspredatory publisherpredatory publisherspredatory journalpredatorypredatory open access publisherpredatory open access publisherspredatory scholarly open-access publishers
Predatory publishing, or more rarely write-only publishing, or deceptive publishing is an exploitative academic publishing business model that involves charging publications fees (also known as article processing charges, or APCs) to authors without checking articles for quality and legitimacy and without providing the other editorial and publishing services associated with legitimate journals (open access or not).wikipedia
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Jeffrey Beall

Beall's List, a report that was regularly updated by Jeffrey Beall of the University of Colorado until January 2017, set forth criteria for categorizing publications as predatory.
Jeffrey Beall is an American librarian, best known for drawing attention to "predatory open access publishing", a term he coined, and for creating what is now widely known as Beall's list, a list of potentially predatory open-access publishers.

Beall's List

a list of "predatory" open access publishersJeffrey Beall's list
Beall's List, a report that was regularly updated by Jeffrey Beall of the University of Colorado until January 2017, set forth criteria for categorizing publications as predatory.
Beall's List was a prominent list of predatory open-access publishers that was maintained by University of Colorado librarian Jeffrey Beall on his blog Scholarly Open Access.

Cabell's blacklist

a blacklistblack list
After the closure, other efforts to identify predatory publishing have sprouted, such as the paywalled Cabell's blacklist, as well as other lists (some based on the original listing by Beall).
Cabell's International, a U.S. company, has published a blacklist of what it claims are predatory journals since June 15, 2017.

Frontiers Media

FrontiersFrontiers in NeurologyFrontiers for Young Minds
A demand by Frontiers Media to open a misconduct case against Beall was reported as the reason Beall closed the list, but an investigation by the university was closed with no findings.
Frontiers Media was, controversially, included in Jeffrey Beall's list of potential predatory open access publishers and has been accused of using email spam.

Scientific Research Publishing

Creative EducationAdvances in Sexual MedicineAmerican Journal of Computational Mathematics
In another early precedent, in 2009 the Improbable Research blog had found that Scientific Research Publishing's journals duplicated papers already published elsewhere; the case was subsequently reported in Nature.
The company has been accused of being a predatory open access publisher and of using email spam to solicit papers for submission.

Who's Afraid of Peer Review?

sting operation2013 ''Science'' stingno sign of actual review
In 2013, John Bohannon, a staff writer for the journal Science and for popular science publications, targeted the open access system by submitting to a number of such journals a deeply flawed paper on the purported effect of a lichen constituent, and published the results in a paper called, "Who's Afraid of Peer Review?".
In part because of the low barrier to entry into this market, as well as the fast and potentially large return on investment, many so-called "predatory publishers" have created low-quality journals that provide little to no peer review or editorial control, essentially publishing every submitted article as long as the publication fee is paid.

Predatory conference

predatory meetingspredatory conferences
SCIgen, a computer program that randomly generates academic computer science papers using context-free grammar, has generated papers that have been accepted by a number of predatory journals as well as predatory conferences.
They are an expansion of the predatory publishing business model, which involves the creation of academic publications built around an exploitative business model that generally involves charging publication fees to authors without providing the editorial and publishing services associated with legitimate journals.

List of scholarly publishing stings

List of scholarly publishing hoaxesscholarly publishing stingAcademic hoaxes
The intent of such publications is typically to expose shortcomings in a journal's peer review process or to criticize the standards of pay-to-publish journals.

Academic journal

journaljournalsacademic journals
Predatory publishing, or more rarely write-only publishing, or deceptive publishing is an exploitative academic publishing business model that involves charging publications fees (also known as article processing charges, or APCs) to authors without checking articles for quality and legitimacy and without providing the other editorial and publishing services associated with legitimate journals (open access or not).
The much lower entry cost of on-line publishing has also raised concerns of an increase in publication of "junk" journals with lower publishing standards.

Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association

OASPAOpen Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA)
Concerns for spamming practices from these journals ushered the leading open access publishers to create the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association in 2008.
One member organization, Frontiers Media, is included on Jeffrey Beall's list of predatory open access publishing companies; at least two members, Hindawi and MDPI, were once called predatory by Beall, but have since been removed from his list.

John Bohannon

In 2013, John Bohannon, a staff writer for the journal Science and for popular science publications, targeted the open access system by submitting to a number of such journals a deeply flawed paper on the purported effect of a lichen constituent, and published the results in a paper called, "Who's Afraid of Peer Review?".
Bohannon submitted the manuscript to 20 open-access publishers well known for their predatory journals and ended up being published in the International Archives of Medicine.

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

HindawiHindawi journals
PLOS ONE and Hindawi rejected it.
In 2010, a subset of Hindawi journals were included in a list of suspected predatory open access publishers by Jeffrey Beall; however Beall later removed Hindawi from his list after re-evaluating the company, calling it a "borderline case".

OMICS Publishing Group

Journal of NeuropsychiatryMedicinal and Aromatic PlantsOMICS
On 25 August 2016, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) filed a lawsuit against the OMICS Group, iMedPub, Conference Series, and the individual Srinubabu Gedela, an Indian national who is president of the companies.
OMICS Publishing Group is a predatory publisher of open access academic journals.

Federal Trade Commission

FTCU.S. Federal Trade CommissionUnited States Federal Trade Commission
On 25 August 2016, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) filed a lawsuit against the OMICS Group, iMedPub, Conference Series, and the individual Srinubabu Gedela, an Indian national who is president of the companies.
In 2016, the FTC launched action against the OMICS Publishing Group — "OMICS Group Inc., a Nevada corporation, also doing business as OMICS Publishing Group, iMEDPub LLC, a Delaware corporation, Conference Series LLC, a Delaware corporation, and Srinubabu Gedela" — for producing predatory journals and organising predatory conferences.

ResearchGate

Research Gate
ResearchGate has also been criticized for failing to provide safeguards against "the dark side of academic writing", including such phenomena as fake publishers, "ghost journals", publishers with "predatory" publication fees, and fake impact ratings.

Author mill

Predatory open access publishing is a closely related practice.

Impact factor

impactjournal impact factorimpact factors
False impact factors are often used by predatory publishers.

Scholarly peer review

peer reviewpeer-reviewedrefereed
More transparent peer review, such as open peer review and post-publication peer review, has been advocated to combat predatory journals.
There have been instances where peer review was claimed to be performed but in fact was not; this has been documented in some predatory open access journals (e.g., the Who's Afraid of Peer Review? affair) or in the case of sponsored Elsevier journals.

Open access

open-accessopen access journalopen-access journal
As Beall has ascribed predatory publishing to a consequence of gold open access (particularly its author-pays variant), one researcher has argued for platinum open access, where the absence of article processing charges removes the publisher's conflict of interest in accepting article submissions.
Predatory publishing does not refer to a homogenous category of practices.

Vanity press

Vanity publishingvanity publishervanity publishers

Pseudo-scholarship

pseudoscholarshippseudo-scholarlypseudoacademic

Academic publishing

research papersacademic paperacademic publisher
Predatory publishing, or more rarely write-only publishing, or deceptive publishing is an exploitative academic publishing business model that involves charging publications fees (also known as article processing charges, or APCs) to authors without checking articles for quality and legitimacy and without providing the other editorial and publishing services associated with legitimate journals (open access or not).