President's House (Philadelphia)

President's HousePresident's House in Philadelphiaexecutive mansioncity houseFriday evening "drawingrooms,in the house across the streetMasters–Penn–Morris House at 190 High StreetPhiladelphia President's HousePhiladelphia presidential housePresident's House (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
The President's House, at 524–30 Market Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was the third Presidential Mansion.wikipedia
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Market Street (Philadelphia)

Market StreetMarket EastMarket Streets
The President's House, at 524–30 Market Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was the third Presidential Mansion.
This house, known as the President's House, was used by George Washington and John Adams as their residence during their terms as President.

Robert Morris (financier)

Robert MorrisMorrisMr. Morris
During his residency the house suffered a fire, and was sold to a man whom Holker knew well, financier Robert Morris.
The President's House, as it became known, would serve as the residence of the president until 1800, when President John Adams moved to the White House in Washington, D.C.

White House

The White HouseExecutive MansionPresident's House
Adams oversaw the transfer of the federal government from the temporary capital of Philadelphia to the District of Columbia, and first occupied the White House there on November 1, 1800.
The City of Philadelphia rented Robert Morris's city house at 190 High Street (now 524–30 Market Street) for Washington's presidential residence.

Oney Judge

Ona JudgeOna Maria Judge
Although initially reluctant, Independence National Historical Park finally expanded its interpretation at the center to include more about slavery, including material about the nine enslaved African Americans: Moll, Christopher Sheels, Hercules, his son Richmond, Oney Judge, her brother Austin, and Giles, Paris, and Joe, who had worked at the President's House.
undefined 1773 – February 25, 1848) was an African American slave who served the Washington family, first at the family's plantation at Mount Vernon and later, after George Washington became president, at the President's House in Philadelphia, then the nation's capital city.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
It housed George Washington from November 27, 1790, to March 10, 1797, and John Adams from March 21, 1797, to May 30, 1800.
The administration regarded powerful tribes as foreign nations, and Washington even smoked a peace pipe and drank wine with them at the Philadelphia presidential house.

Independence National Historical Park

Independence MallIndependence Mall EastIndependence Hall area
Although initially reluctant, Independence National Historical Park finally expanded its interpretation at the center to include more about slavery, including material about the nine enslaved African Americans: Moll, Christopher Sheels, Hercules, his son Richmond, Oney Judge, her brother Austin, and Giles, Paris, and Joe, who had worked at the President's House. These, along with surviving sections of the backbuildings, were demolished in the 1950s during the development of Independence Mall.
An additional three blocks directly north of Independence Hall, collectively known as Independence Mall, contain the Liberty Bell Center, National Constitution Center, Independence Visitor Center, and the former site of the President's House.

Hercules Posey

HerculesHercules (chef)
Although initially reluctant, Independence National Historical Park finally expanded its interpretation at the center to include more about slavery, including material about the nine enslaved African Americans: Moll, Christopher Sheels, Hercules, his son Richmond, Oney Judge, her brother Austin, and Giles, Paris, and Joe, who had worked at the President's House.
Hercules "Uncle Harkless" Posey (1748 – May 15, 1812) was an African American slave owned by the Washington family, serving as the family's head chef for many years, first at the family's plantation at Mount Vernon in Virginia and later, after George Washington was elected president of the newly formed United States of America, in the country's then-capital city of Philadelphia in Pennsylvania at the President's House, working alongside Oney Judge.

Oval Office

Bow WindowEric Gugleroffice
The Park undertook a public archaeology project in 2007 that uncovered foundations of the backbuildings, the President's office, and the massive Bow Window designed by Washington as a ceremonial space.
In 1790, Washington built a large, two-story, semi-circular addition to the rear of the President's House in Philadelphia, creating a ceremonial space in which the public would meet the president.

Richard Penn (governor)

Richard PennRichard Penn, Jr.R.M. Penn
In 1772, she gave it as a wedding gift to her elder daughter, who married Richard Penn, a grandson of William Penn and the lieutenant-governor of the Colony.
From 1790 to 1800, while Philadelphia was the temporary capital of the United States, it served as the executive mansion for Presidents George Washington and John Adams until the national capital moved to Washington, DC in November 1800.

George Washington Parke Custis

G.W. P. CustisGeorge Washington CustisWash" Custis
His wife Martha and two of her grandchildren, "Wash" Custis and Nelly Custis, were part of the First Family.
Following the transfer of the national capital to Philadelphia, the original "First Family" occupied the President's House from 1790 to 1797.

Martha Washington

MarthaMartha Dandridge CustisMartha Custis Washington
His wife Martha and two of her grandchildren, "Wash" Custis and Nelly Custis, were part of the First Family.
Seven of the nine slaves whom President Washington brought to Philadelphia (the national capital, 1790–1800) to work in the President's House were "dowers".

Liberty Bell

Liberty Bell CenterBellCentennial Bell
In late 2000, during excavation for the new Liberty Bell Center, foundations of the President's House were uncovered.
Significantly larger than the existing pavilion, allowing for exhibit space and an interpretive center, the proposed LBC building also would cover about 15% of the footprint of the long-demolished President's House, the "White House" of George Washington and John Adams.

Christopher Sheels

Christopher Shields
Although initially reluctant, Independence National Historical Park finally expanded its interpretation at the center to include more about slavery, including material about the nine enslaved African Americans: Moll, Christopher Sheels, Hercules, his son Richmond, Oney Judge, her brother Austin, and Giles, Paris, and Joe, who had worked at the President's House.
The Philadelphia President's House had a larger household, about twenty-four servants initially, including eight slaves from Mount Vernon — Oney Judge, Austin, Giles, Paris, Moll, Hercules, Richmond, Christopher Sheels.

An Act for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery

Gradual Abolition ActGradual Abolition lawAct for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery
Members of Congress were exempt from Pennsylvania's Gradual Abolition Act, but not officers of the executive and judicial branches.
Litigating the issue might have clarified his legal status and that of other slaveholding federal officials, but it also would have called attention to his slaveholding in the President's House and put him at risk of losing those slaves to manumission.

Eleanor Parke Custis Lewis

Eleanor Parke CustisNelly CustisEleanor (Nelly) Parke Custis
His wife Martha and two of her grandchildren, "Wash" Custis and Nelly Custis, were part of the First Family.
During George Washington's presidency, Nelly helped entertain guests at the first presidential mansion on Cherry Street in New York City, the second presidential mansion on Broadway in New York City, and the third presidential mansion in Philadelphia.

Alexander Macomb House

second presidential mansionsecond presidential mansions
Washington vacated the Macomb House on August 30, 1790, and returned to Mount Vernon, stopping in Philadelphia to examine what was to become the third Presidential Mansion, the Masters–Penn–Morris House at 190 High Street.

Samuel Osgood House

firstfirst presidential mansionpresidential household in New York City (1789-1790)

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia, PACity of Philadelphia
The President's House, at 524–30 Market Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was the third Presidential Mansion.

John Adams

AdamsJohnPresident John Adams
It housed George Washington from November 27, 1790, to March 10, 1797, and John Adams from March 21, 1797, to May 30, 1800.

William Penn

PennPenn familyPenns
In 1772, she gave it as a wedding gift to her elder daughter, who married Richard Penn, a grandson of William Penn and the lieutenant-governor of the Colony.

Province of Pennsylvania

PennsylvaniaPennsylvania ColonyPennsylvania Provincial Assembly
In 1772, she gave it as a wedding gift to her elder daughter, who married Richard Penn, a grandson of William Penn and the lieutenant-governor of the Colony.

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican War of IndependenceAmerican Revolution
The Penns and the Masterses moved to England during the early days of the American Revolutionary War.

William Howe, 5th Viscount Howe

William HoweSir William HoweGeneral Howe
During the British occupation of Philadelphia, September 1777 to June 1778, the house was headquarters for General Sir William Howe.

Benedict Arnold

ArnoldBenedictGen. Benedict Arnold
Following the British evacuation, it housed the American military governor, Benedict Arnold, and it was here that he began his treason.