President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentpresidentialUS PresidentUnited States PresidentPresidencyPresidentsU.S. presidentsAmerican PresidentPresidents of the United States
The President of the United States (POTUS) is the head of state and head of government of the United States of America.wikipedia
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Powers of the President of the United States

at the pleasure of the PresidentCommander-in-Chiefexecutive power
The president directs the executive branch of the federal government and is the commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces.
The powers of the President of the United States include those powers explicitly granted by Article II of the United States Constitution to the President of the United States, powers granted by Acts of Congress, implied powers, and also a great deal of soft power that is attached to the presidency.

United States Armed Forces

U.S. militaryUnited States militaryarmed forces
The president directs the executive branch of the federal government and is the commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces.
The President of the United States is the Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces and forms military policy with the Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS), both federal executive departments, acting as the principal organs by which military policy is carried out.

United States Electoral College

Electoral Collegepresidential electorelectoral votes
Through the Electoral College, registered voters indirectly elect the president and vice president to a four-year term.
The United States Electoral College is a body of electors established by the United States Constitution, constituted every four years for the sole purpose of electing the president and vice president of the United States.

Vice President of the United States

Vice Presidentvice presidentialU.S. Vice President
Through the Electoral College, registered voters indirectly elect the president and vice president to a four-year term.
The Vice President of the United States (informally referred to as VPOTUS, VP, or Veep) is the second-highest officer in the executive branch of the U.S. federal government, after the President of the United States, and ranks first in the presidential line of succession.

Natural-born-citizen clause

natural-born citizennatural born citizennatural-born citizen of the United States
[[Article Two of the United States Constitution#Clause 5: Qualifications for office|Article II, Section 1, Clause 5]] sets three qualifications for holding the presidency: natural-born U.S. citizenship; at least thirty-five years of age; and residency in the United States for at least fourteen years.
Status as a natural-born citizen of the United States is one of the eligibility requirements established in the United States Constitution for holding the office of President or Vice President.

List of Presidents of the United States

President of the United StatesPresident44th
In all, 44 individuals have served 45 presidencies spanning 57 full four-year terms.
The President of the United States is the head of state and head of government of the United States, indirectly elected to a four-year term by the people through the Electoral College.

Donald Trump

TrumpPresident TrumpPresident Donald Trump
Donald Trump of New York is the 45th and current president.
Donald John Trump (born June 14, 1946) is the 45th and current president of the United States.

Twenty-second Amendment to the United States Constitution

22nd AmendmentTwenty-second Amendment22nd Amendment to the U.S. Constitution
The Twenty-second Amendment precludes any person from being elected president to a third term.
The Twenty-second Amendment (Amendment XXII) to the United States Constitution sets a limit on the number of times an individual is eligible for election to the office of President of the United States, and also sets additional eligibility conditions for presidents who succeed to the unexpired terms of their predecessors.

Article One of the United States Constitution

Article IArticle OneU.S. Const. art. I
In addition, as part of the system of checks and balances, Article I, Section 7 of the Constitution gives the president the power to sign or veto federal legislation.
Section 7 lays out the procedures for passing a bill, requiring both houses of Congress to pass a bill for it to become law, subject to the veto power of the President of the United States.

Inauguration of Donald Trump

inaugurationTrump's inaugurationinaugurated
He assumed office on January 20, 2017.
The inauguration of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States marked commencement of the four-year term of Donald Trump as President and Mike Pence as Vice President.

United States

American🇺🇸U.S.
The President of the United States (POTUS) is the head of state and head of government of the United States of America.
George Washington, who had led the revolutionary army to victory, was the first president elected under the new constitution.

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
The president is further empowered to grant federal pardons and reprieves, and to convene and adjourn either or both houses of Congress under extraordinary circumstances.
The Senate ratifies treaties and approves presidential appointments while the House initiates revenue-raising bills.

Articles of Confederation

Articles of Confederation and Perpetual UnionArticles of Confederation and Perpetual Union.Confederation
Congress finished work on the Articles of Confederation to establish a perpetual union between the states in November 1777 and sent it to the states for ratification.
The new Constitution provided for a much stronger federal government by establishing a chief executive (the President), courts, and taxing powers.

James Madison

MadisonPresident MadisonPresident James Madison
Prospects for the next convention appeared bleak until James Madison and Edmund Randolph succeeded in securing George Washington's attendance to Philadelphia as a delegate for Virginia.
James Madison Jr. (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was an American statesman and Founding Father who served as the fourth president of the United States from 1809 to 1817.

U.S. state

Statestatesstatehood
Recognizing the necessity of closely coordinating their efforts against the British, the Continental Congress simultaneously began the process of drafting a constitution that would bind the states together.
Each state is also entitled to select a number of electors (equal to the total number of representatives and senators from that state) to vote in the Electoral College, the body that directly elects the President of the United States.

United States Constitution

ConstitutionU.S. Constitutionconstitutional
It was through the closed-door negotiations at Philadelphia that the presidency framed in the U.S. Constitution emerged.
Its first three articles embody the doctrine of the separation of powers, whereby the federal government is divided into three branches: the legislative, consisting of the bicameral Congress (Article One); the executive, consisting of the President (Article Two); and the judicial, consisting of the Supreme Court and other federal courts (Article Three).

Line Item Veto Act of 1996

Line Item Veto ActLine Item VetoLine-Item Veto bill
In 1996, Congress attempted to enhance the president's veto power with the Line Item Veto Act.
The Line Item Veto Act of 1996 was a federal law of the United States that granted the President the power to line-item veto budget bills passed by Congress, but its effect was brief as the act was soon ruled unconstitutional by the Supreme Court in Clinton v. City of New York.

President of the Continental Congress

PresidentPresident of CongressPresidents of the United States in Congress Assembled
The members of Congress elected a President of the United States in Congress Assembled to preside over its deliberation as a neutral discussion moderator.
Designed to be a largely ceremonial position without much influence, the office was unrelated to the later office of President of the United States.

Supreme Court of the United States

Supreme CourtUnited States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme Court
In Clinton v. City of New York, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled such a legislative alteration of the veto power to be unconstitutional.
According to federal statute, the Court normally consists of the Chief Justice of the United States and eight associate justices who are nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate.

Ulysses S. Grant

GrantPresident GrantGeneral Grant
Abraham Lincoln was deeply involved in overall strategy and in day-to-day operations during the American Civil War, 1861–1865; historians have given Lincoln high praise for his strategic sense and his ability to select and encourage commanders such as Ulysses S. Grant.
Ulysses S. Grant (born Hiram Ulysses Grant; April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was the 18th president of the United States from 1869 to 1877, commanding general of the Army, soldier, international statesman, and author.

American Civil War

Civil WarU.S. Civil Warthe Civil War
Abraham Lincoln was deeply involved in overall strategy and in day-to-day operations during the American Civil War, 1861–1865; historians have given Lincoln high praise for his strategic sense and his ability to select and encourage commanders such as Ulysses S. Grant.
Primarily as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people, war broke out in April 1861 when secessionist forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina shortly after Abraham Lincoln had been inaugurated as the President of the United States.

Theodore Roosevelt

Teddy RooseveltRooseveltPresident Theodore Roosevelt
Presidents have historically initiated the process for going to war, but critics have charged that there have been several conflicts in which presidents did not get official declarations, including Theodore Roosevelt's military move into Panama in 1903, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the invasions of Grenada in 1983 and Panama in 1989.
Theodore Roosevelt Jr. (October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919) was an American statesman and writer who served as the 26th president of the United States from 1901 to 1909.

United States Secretary of Defense

Secretary of DefenseDefense SecretaryU.S. Secretary of Defense
The present-day operational command of the Armed Forces is delegated to the Department of Defense and is normally exercised through the Secretary of Defense.
The Secretary of Defense (SecDef) is the leader and chief executive officer of the United States Department of Defense, the executive department of the Armed Forces of the U.S. The Secretary of Defense's position of command and authority over the U.S. military is second only to that of the President and Congress, respectively.

Clinton v. City of New York

in 1998line-item veto was unconstitutional
In Clinton v. City of New York, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled such a legislative alteration of the veto power to be unconstitutional.
Clinton v. City of New York, 524 U.S. 417 (1998), is a legal case in which the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that the line-item veto as granted in the Line Item Veto Act of 1996 violated the Presentment Clause of the United States Constitution because it impermissibly gave the President of the United States the power to unilaterally amend or repeal parts of statutes that had been duly passed by the United States Congress.

War Powers Resolution

War Powers Act1973 War Powers Resolutionadvocating
Pursuant to the War Powers Resolution, Congress must authorize any troop deployments longer than 60 days, although that process relies on triggering mechanisms that have never been employed, rendering it ineffectual.
The War Powers Resolution (also known as the War Powers Resolution of 1973 or the War Powers Act) (50 U.S.C. 1541–1548) is a federal law intended to check the president's power to commit the United States to an armed conflict without the consent of the U.S. Congress.