Ulysses S. Grant is shown surrendering to James A. Garfield after losing the 1880 Republican presidential nomination to him, in this satirical Puck cartoon.
George Washington, the first president of the United States
Franklin D. Roosevelt, elected to four terms, was president from 1933 until his death in 1945.
President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivers a radio address, 1933
A map of how the states voted on the Twenty-second Amendment
President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1964 Civil Rights Act as Martin Luther King Jr. and others look on
The Twenty-Second Amendment in the National Archives
President Donald Trump delivers his 2018 State of the Union Address, with Vice President Mike Pence and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan
President George H. W. Bush and Russian President Gorbachev sign the 1990 Chemical Weapons Accord in the White House.
Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, successfully preserved the Union during the American Civil War.
President Barack Obama with his Supreme Court appointee Justice Sotomayor, 2009
President Ronald Reagan reviews honor guards during a state visit to China, 1984
President Woodrow Wilson throws out the ceremonial first ball on Opening Day, 1916
President Jimmy Carter (left) debates Republican nominee Ronald Reagan on October 28, 1980.
Map of the United States showing the number of electoral votes allocated following the 2010 census to each state and the District of Columbia for the 2012, 2016 and 2020 presidential elections; it also notes that Maine and Nebraska distribute electors by way of the congressional district method. 270 electoral votes are required for a majority out of 538 votes possible.
Franklin D. Roosevelt won a record four presidential elections (1932, 1936, 1940 and 1944), leading to the adoption of a two-term limit.
President William McKinley and his successor, Theodore Roosevelt
President Reagan surrounded by Secret Service
From left: George H. W. Bush, Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and Jimmy Carter. Photo taken in the Oval Office on January 7, 2009; Obama formally took office thirteen days later.
Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George H.W. Bush, and Jimmy Carter at the dedication of the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas, 2013
White House, the official residence
Camp David, the official retreat
Blair House, the official guest house
The presidential limousine, dubbed "The Beast"
The presidential plane, called Air Force One when the president is on board
Marine One helicopter, when the president is aboard

The Twenty-second Amendment (Amendment XXII) to the United States Constitution limits the number of times a person is eligible for election to the office of President of the United States to two, and sets additional eligibility conditions for presidents who succeed to the unexpired terms of their predecessors.

- Twenty-second Amendment to the United States Constitution

Under the Twenty-second Amendment, ratified in 1951, no person who has been elected to two presidential terms may be elected to a third.

- President of the United States

4 related topics

Alpha

Official portrait, 1959

Dwight D. Eisenhower

Official portrait, 1959
The Eisenhower family home in Abilene, Kansas
Eisenhower (third from left) and Omar Bradley (second from right) were members of the 1912 West Point football team.
Mamie Eisenhower, painted in 1953 by Thomas E. Stephens
Eisenhower (far right) with three friends (William Stuhler, Major Brett, and Paul V. Robinson) in 1919, four years after graduating from West Point
Eisenhower as a major general, 1942
General Eisenhower, General Patton (standing to the left) and President Roosevelt in Sicily, 1943
Eisenhower speaks with men of the 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment (PIR), part of the 101st "Screaming Eagles" Airborne Division, on June 5, 1944, the day before the D-Day invasion. The officer Eisenhower is speaking to is First Lieutenant Wallace Strobel.
From left, front row includes army officers Simpson, Patton, Spaatz, Eisenhower, Bradley, Hodges and Gerow in 1945
Eisenhower with Allied commanders following the signing of the German Instrument of Surrender at Reims
Eisenhower as General of the Army, 1945
General Eisenhower served as military governor of the American zone (highlighted) in Allied-occupied Germany from May through November 1945.
General Eisenhower (left) in Warsaw, Poland, 1945
Eisenhower lighting the Columbia University Yule Log, 1949
Eisenhower posing in front of Alma Mater at Columbia in 1953
As president of Columbia, Eisenhower presents an honorary degree to Jawaharlal Nehru.
Eisenhower button from the 1952 campaign
1952 electoral vote results
1956 electoral vote results
February 1959 White House portrait
Eisenhower meeting with Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser during Nasser's visit to United Nations in New York, September 1960
Eisenhower visits the Kingdom of Afghanistan and its king Mohammed Zahir Shah in Kabul.
Eisenhower with Indian Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru.
U.S. President Eisenhower visits the Republic of China and its President Chiang Kai-shek in Taipei.
Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev during his 11-day U.S. visit as guest of President Eisenhower, September 1959.
President Eisenhower with Wernher von Braun, 1960
Eisenhower in Korea with General Chung Il-kwon, and Baik Seon-yup, 1952
Spanish dictator Francisco Franco and Eisenhower in Madrid in 1959.
Eisenhower with the Shah of Iran, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi (1959)
Eisenhower and Vice President Richard Nixon with their host, King Saud of Saudi Arabia, at the Mayflower Hotel (1957)
A U-2 reconnaissance aircraft in flight
Official White House Portrait of President Eisenhower, c. 1960
Eisenhower speaks to the press at the 1964 Republican National Convention
President Lyndon Johnson with Eisenhower aboard Air Force One in October 1965
Eisenhower with President Richard Nixon in February 1969
Eisenhower's funeral service
Graves of Dwight D. Eisenhower, Doud Dwight "Icky" Eisenhower and Mamie Eisenhower in Abilene, Kansas
Eisenhower signs the legislation that changes Armistice Day to Veterans Day, June 1, 1954
President John F. Kennedy meets with General Eisenhower at Camp David, April 22, 1961, three days after the failed Bay of Pigs Invasion
Eisenhower Interstate System sign south of San Antonio, Texas
Bronze statue of Eisenhower in the Capitol rotunda
The star of the Soviet Order of Victory awarded to Eisenhower
The coat of arms granted to Eisenhower upon his incorporation as a knight of the Danish Order of the Elephant in 1950. The anvil represents the fact that his name is derived from the German for "iron hewer", making these an example of canting arms.

Dwight David "Ike" Eisenhower (born David Dwight Eisenhower; ; October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American military officer and statesman who served as the 34th president of the United States from 1953 to 1961.

The 22nd Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified in 1951, and it set a two-term limit on the presidency.

Official portrait, 1981

Ronald Reagan

Official portrait, 1981
Ronald Reagan's boyhood home in Dixon, Illinois
The Bad Man (1941)
Capt. Ronald Reagan at Fort Roach, 1943 or 1944.
Guest stars for the premiere of The Dick Powell Show, 1961. Reagan can be seen wearing a ten-gallon hat on the far left.
Reagan testifying before the House Un-American Activities Committee, October 1947
Reagan and his first wife Jane Wyman, 1942
Wedding of Ronald and Nancy Reagan, 1952. Matron of honor Brenda Marshall (left) and best man William Holden (right) were the sole guests.
Nancy and Ronald Reagan aboard a boat in California, 1964
The Reagans meet with President Richard Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon, July 1970
Reagan and President Ford shake hands on the podium after Reagan narrowly lost the nomination at the 1976 Republican National Convention
1980 electoral vote results
Ronald Reagan, moderator Jon Breen, and Bush participate in the Nashua, New Hampshire presidential debate, 1980
President and Mrs. Reagan at the 1981 inauguration parade
Supreme Court justice-nominee Sandra Day O'Connor talks with Reagan outside the White House, July 15, 1981.
Reagan outlines his plan for Tax Reduction Legislation in a televised address from the Oval Office, July 1981
Reagan addresses Congress on the Program for Economic Recovery, April 28, 1981 (a few weeks after surviving the assassination attempt)
As the first U.S. president invited to speak before the British Parliament (June 8, 1982), Reagan predicted Marxism–Leninism would end up on the "ash heap of history".
Meeting with leaders of the Afghan Mujahideen in the Oval Office, 1983
Reagan with actress Sigourney Weaver and King Fahd of Saudi Arabia in 1985. The U.S. and Saudi Arabia supplied money and arms to the anti-Soviet fighters in Afghanistan.
Reagan (far left) and First Lady Nancy Reagan pay their respects to the 17 American victims of the April 18 attack on the U.S. embassy by Hezbollah in Beirut, 1983
1984 presidential electoral votes by state. Reagan (red) won every state except Mondale's home state of Minnesota; Mondale also carried the District of Columbia.
Reagan is sworn in for a second term as president by Chief Justice Burger in the Capitol rotunda
British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher (here with Reagan in 1986) granted the U.S. use of British airbases to launch the Libya attack.
Reagan (center) receives the Tower Commission Report regarding the Iran-Contra affair in the Cabinet Room with John Tower (left) and Edmund Muskie (right)
Challenging Gorbachev to "tear down this wall" at the Brandenburg Gate, June 12, 1987
Gorbachev and Reagan sign the INF Treaty at the White House, December 1987
The Reagans in Los Angeles, 1992
The Reagans with a model of USS Ronald Reagan, May 1996
Reagan lying in state in the Capitol rotunda
A bronze statue of Reagan standing in the National Statuary Hall Collection
President Reagan and Soviet General Secretary Gorbachev, 1985
Reagan in 1982
Approval ratings for President Reagan (Gallup)
Former President Reagan returns to the White House to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Bush, 1993
{{circa}} 1916–17. Pictured from left: Father Jack, older brother Neil, Reagan (with "Dutchboy" haircut), and mother Nelle
1920s. As a teenager, in Dixon, Illinois
{{circa|lk=no|1960}}. Hosting General Electric Theater
1976. At his home at Rancho del Cielo
1985. His second presidential portrait

Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911June 5, 2004) was an American politician who served as the 40th president of the United States from 1981 to 1989.

Reagan continued to speak publicly in favor of the Brady Bill; a constitutional amendment requiring a balanced budget; and the repeal of the 22nd Amendment, which prohibits anyone from serving more than two terms as president.

Page one of the officially engrossed copy of the Constitution signed by delegates. A print run of 500 copies of the final version preceded this copy.

Constitution of the United States

Supreme law of the United States of America.

Supreme law of the United States of America.

Page one of the officially engrossed copy of the Constitution signed by delegates. A print run of 500 copies of the final version preceded this copy.
Signing of the Constitution, September 17, 1787 (1940 by Howard Chandler Christy)
Dates the 13 states ratified the Constitution
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"We the People" in an original edition
Closing endorsement section of the United States Constitution
United States Bill of Rights
Currently housed in the National Archives.
John Jay, 1789–1795
John Marshall, 1801–1835
Salmon P. Chase {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Chase Court, 1864–1873, in 1865 were Salmon P. Chase (chief Justice); Hon. Nathan Clifford, Maine; Stephen J. Field, Justice Supreme Court, U.S.; Hon. Samuel F. Miller, U.S. Supreme Court; Hon. Noah H. Swayne, Justice Supreme Court, U.S.; Judge Morrison R. Waite}}
William Howard Taft {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Taft Court, 1921–1930, in 1925 were James Clark McReynolds, Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., William Howard Taft (chief justice), Willis Van Devanter, Louis Brandeis. Edward Sanford, George Sutherland, Pierce Butler, Harlan Fiske Stone}}
Earl Warren {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Warren Court, 1953–1969, in 1963 were Felix Frankfurter; Hugo Black; Earl Warren (chief justice); Stanley Reed; William O. Douglas. Tom Clark; Robert H. Jackson; Harold Burton; Sherman Minton}}
William Rehnquist {{refn|group= lower-alpha|The Rehnquist Court, 1986–2005.}}
José Rizal
Sun Yat-sen

Its first three articles embody the doctrine of the separation of powers, whereby the federal government is divided into three branches: the legislative, consisting of the bicameral Congress (Article I); the executive, consisting of the president and subordinate officers (Article II); and the judicial, consisting of the Supreme Court and other federal courts (Article III).

Excluding the Twenty-seventh Amendment, which was pending before the states for 202 years, 273 days, the longest pending amendment that was successfully ratified was the Twenty-second Amendment, which took 3 years, 344 days.

Ambtenaar ("Government official"), by Louis Dusée, Utrecht, 1961

Term limit

Legal restriction that limits the number of terms an officeholder may serve in a particular elected office.

Legal restriction that limits the number of terms an officeholder may serve in a particular elected office.

Ambtenaar ("Government official"), by Louis Dusée, Utrecht, 1961

Presidents of the United States typically honored an informal tradition of only serving two terms in office, but this limit was not enshrined into law until the 22nd Amendment to the Constitution was ratified in 1951 after Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected to an unprecedented third and fourth terms.