A report on President of the United States

George Washington, the first president of the United States
President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivers a radio address, 1933
President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1964 Civil Rights Act as Martin Luther King Jr. and others look on
President Donald Trump delivers his 2018 State of the Union Address, with Vice President Mike Pence and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan
President George H. W. Bush and Russian President Gorbachev sign the 1990 Chemical Weapons Accord in the White House.
Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, successfully preserved the Union during the American Civil War.
President Barack Obama with his Supreme Court appointee Justice Sotomayor, 2009
President Ronald Reagan reviews honor guards during a state visit to China, 1984
President Woodrow Wilson throws out the ceremonial first ball on Opening Day, 1916
President Jimmy Carter (left) debates Republican nominee Ronald Reagan on October 28, 1980.
Map of the United States showing the number of electoral votes allocated following the 2010 census to each state and the District of Columbia for the 2012, 2016 and 2020 presidential elections; it also notes that Maine and Nebraska distribute electors by way of the congressional district method. 270 electoral votes are required for a majority out of 538 votes possible.
Franklin D. Roosevelt won a record four presidential elections (1932, 1936, 1940 and 1944), leading to the adoption of a two-term limit.
President William McKinley and his successor, Theodore Roosevelt
President Reagan surrounded by Secret Service
From left: George H. W. Bush, Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and Jimmy Carter. Photo taken in the Oval Office on January 7, 2009; Obama formally took office thirteen days later.
Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George H.W. Bush, and Jimmy Carter at the dedication of the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas, 2013
White House, the official residence
Camp David, the official retreat
Blair House, the official guest house
The presidential limousine, dubbed "The Beast"
The presidential plane, called Air Force One when the president is on board
Marine One helicopter, when the president is aboard

Head of state and head of government of the United States of America.

- President of the United States

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John Jay, by Gilbert Stuart, 1794

John Jay

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American statesman, patriot, diplomat, Founding Father, abolitionist, negotiator, and signatory of the Treaty of Paris of 1783.

American statesman, patriot, diplomat, Founding Father, abolitionist, negotiator, and signatory of the Treaty of Paris of 1783.

John Jay, by Gilbert Stuart, 1794
John Jay, by Gilbert Stuart, 1794
Drawing of Sarah Jay by Robert Edge Pine.
Jay's childhood home in Rye, New York is a New York State Historic Site and Westchester County Park
Jay's retirement home near Katonah, New York is a New York State Historic Site
The Treaty of Paris, by Benjamin West (1783) (Jay stands farthest to the left). The British delegation refused to pose for the painting, leaving it unfinished.
Jay as he appears at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.
The Jay Treaty.
Gubernatorial portrait of Jay.
Certificate of Election of Jay as Governor of New York (June 6, 1795)
John Jay 15¢ Liberty Issue postage stamp, 1958.
Rye, New York Post Office Dedication Stamp and cancellation, September 5, 1936

After the establishment of the new federal government, Jay was appointed by President George Washington the first Chief Justice of the United States, serving from 1789 to 1795.

Executive Office of the President of the United States

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The Eisenhower Executive Office Building at night

The Executive Office of the President (EOP) comprises the offices and agencies that support the work of the president at the center of the executive branch of the United States federal government.

United States Department of Defense

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Executive branch department of the federal government charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government directly related to national security and the United States Armed Forces.

Executive branch department of the federal government charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government directly related to national security and the United States Armed Forces.

President Truman signs the National Security Act Amendment of 1949
Department of Defense organizational chart (December 2013)
2008 OSD organizational chart
Joint Chiefs of Staff/Joint Staff organizational chart
Combatant command areas of responsibility
Defense Spending as a Percent of GDP (1792–2017)
Total United States Defense Outlays 1962–2024, $millions (2019-2024 estimated)
Defense Intelligence Agency
National Security Agency
National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency
National Reconnaissance Office
Department of the Army
Department of the Navy
Department of the Air Force
U.S. Army
U.S. Marine Corps
U.S. Navy
U.S. Air Force
U.S. Space Force

The Department of Defense is headed by the secretary of defense, a cabinet-level head who reports directly to the president of the United States.

United States Secretary of Defense

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Head of the United States Department of Defense, the executive department of the U.S. Armed Forces, and is a high ranking member of the federal cabinet.

Head of the United States Department of Defense, the executive department of the U.S. Armed Forces, and is a high ranking member of the federal cabinet.

Seal of the National Military Establishment (1947–1949)
Donald Rumsfeld is sworn-in as Secretary of Defense by Associate Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart as U.S. President Gerald R. Ford and Chairman of The Joint Chiefs of Staff General George S. Brown watch at The Pentagon on November 20, 1975.
Department of Defense organizational chart (December 2013)

The secretary of defense's position of command and authority over the military is second only to that of the president of the United States, who is the commander-in-chief.

Indirect election

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Election in which voters do not choose directly between candidates or parties for an office , but elect people who in turn choose candidates or parties.

Election in which voters do not choose directly between candidates or parties for an office , but elect people who in turn choose candidates or parties.

The President of the United States is elected indirectly. Technically, in a US presidential election, eligible members of the public elect the members of an Electoral College, who have previously pledged publicly to support a particular presidential candidate. When the electoral college sits, soon after the election, it formally elects the candidate that has won a majority of the members of the electoral college. Because the electoral college seldom acts in an unexpected or unpredictable fashion, it is sometimes regarded as a ceremonial body, and US presidential elections are regarded as semi-direct. Conversely, because the members of the federal cabinet, including the vice president are, in practice, nominated by the president, they are unquestionably elected indirectly. The electoral college is a controversial issue in US politics, especially following presidential elections when voting is polarized geographically in such a way that the electoral college [[List of United States presidential elections in which the winner lost the popular vote|elects a candidate who did not win an absolute majority of the popular vote]]. The National Popular Vote Interstate Compact, if enacted, would replace the Electoral College with a de facto plurality based direct election.

Clinton in 2016

Hillary Clinton

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American politician, diplomat, and former lawyer who served as the 67th United States secretary of state from 2009 to 2013, as a United States senator representing New York from 2001 to 2009, and as First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001 as the wife of President Bill Clinton.

American politician, diplomat, and former lawyer who served as the 67th United States secretary of state from 2009 to 2013, as a United States senator representing New York from 2001 to 2009, and as First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001 as the wife of President Bill Clinton.

Clinton in 2016
Mementos of Hillary Rodham's early life, shown at the William J. Clinton Presidential Center
Rodham in Maine South High School's 1965 yearbook
Rodham (center) campaigning for Wellesley College Government President in 1968, an election which she later won
Hillary and Bill lived in this house in Little Rock's Hillcrest neighborhood while he was Arkansas Attorney General (1977–1979).
Bill and Hillary Clinton with President Ronald and First Lady Nancy Reagan
Clinton in 1992
Clinton presenting her health care plan, September 1993
Hillary Clinton speaks about the 1993 health care plan at GWU Hospital.
Read Across America Day in Maryland, 1998
Inauguration Day walk down Pennsylvania Avenue to start Bill's second term as president, January 20, 1997
Results of the 2000 United States Senate election in New York. Clinton won the counties in blue.
Reenactment of Hillary Rodham Clinton's swearing-in as a U.S. senator by Vice President Al Gore in the Old Senate Chamber, as Bill and Chelsea look on
Official photo as U.S. senator
Clinton listens as the chief of naval operations, Admiral Michael Mullen, responds to a question during his 2007 confirmation hearing with the Senate Armed Services Committee
Clinton at the 2007 CDA National Convention
Clinton campaigning at Augsburg College in Minneapolis, Minnesota, two days before Super Tuesday, 2008
State-by-state popular votes in the Democratic primaries and caucuses, shaded by percentage won: Obama in purple, Clinton in green. (Popular vote winners and delegate winners differed in New Hampshire, Nevada, Missouri, Texas and Guam.)
Clinton speaks on behalf of her former rival, Barack Obama, during the second night of the 2008 Democratic National Convention
Official secretary of state portrait, 2009
Associate Judge Kathryn Oberly of the D.C. Court of Appeals administers the oath of office of secretary of state to Hillary Rodham Clinton as her husband Bill Clinton holds the Bible
Clinton and Obama at the 21st NATO summit, April 2009
Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Clinton hold a "reset button", March 2009
Greeting service members at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, October 2010
The London meeting to discuss NATO military intervention in Libya, March 29, 2011
Clinton with Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi during her December 2011 visit to Myanmar
Clinton, along with members of the national security team, receive an update on Operation Neptune Spear in the White House Situation Room on May 1, 2011. Everyone in the room is watching a live feed from drones operating over the Osama bin Laden complex.
Obama and Clinton honor the Benghazi attack victims at the Transfer of Remains Ceremony, held at Andrews Air Force Base on September 14, 2012
Clinton addressing email controversy with the media at the UN Headquarters on March 10, 2015
Clinton in September 2014
Clinton campaigning for president in Manchester, New Hampshire, in October 2016, with Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren (seated)
Clinton, accepting Senator Bernie Sanders' endorsement in New Hampshire, July 2016
Clinton delivering her concession speech
The Clintons at Donald Trump's inauguration
Clinton and her husband attend a wreath laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery after the inauguration of Joe Biden
Copies of What Happened at an event on Clinton's book tour promoting the memoir
2016 presidential campaign logo
Clinton worked at Rose Law Firm for fifteen years. Her professional career and political involvement set the stage for public reaction to her as the first lady.
Clinton in April 2015
Secretary Clinton meets with Algeria's President Bouteflika, 2012

A member of the Democratic Party, she was the party's nominee for president in the 2016 presidential election, becoming the first woman to win a presidential nomination by a major U.S. political party; Clinton won the popular vote, but lost the Electoral College vote, thereby losing the election to Donald Trump.

President of the Continental Congress

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The presiding officer of the Continental Congress, the convention of delegates that emerged as the first national government of the United States during the American Revolution.

The presiding officer of the Continental Congress, the convention of delegates that emerged as the first national government of the United States during the American Revolution.

Designed to be a largely ceremonial position without much influence, the office was unrelated to the later office of President of the United States.

Recess appointment

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In the United States, a recess appointment is an appointment by the president of a federal official when the U.S. Senate is in recess.

War Powers Resolution

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The War Powers Resolution (also known as the War Powers Resolution of 1973 or the War Powers Act) is a federal law intended to check the U.S. president's power to commit the United States to an armed conflict without the consent of the U.S. Congress.

New York (state)

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State in the Northeastern United States.

State in the Northeastern United States.

New York was dominated by Iroquoian (purple) and Algonquian (pink) tribes.
New Amsterdam, present-day Lower Manhattan, 1660
New York and neighboring provinces, by Claude Joseph Sauthier, 1777
British general John Burgoyne surrenders at Saratoga in 1777
1800 map of New York from Low's Encyclopaedia
The Erie Canal at Lockport, New York, in 1839
Flight 175 hitting the South Tower on September11, 2001
Flooding on AvenueC in Lower Manhattan caused by Hurricane Sandy
New York is bordered by six U.S. states, two Great Lakes, and the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec.
Enveloped by the Atlantic Ocean and Long Island Sound, New York City and Long Island alone are home to about eleven million residents conjointly.
Lake-effect snow is a major contributor to heavy snowfall totals in western New York, including the Tug Hill region.
Two major state parks (in green) are the Adirondack Park (north) and the Catskill Park (south).
The Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor is a symbol of the United States and its ideals.
The African Burial Ground National Monument in Lower Manhattan
Map of the counties in New York
New York population distribution map. New York's population is primarily concentrated in the Greater New York area, including New York City and Long Island.
The Stonewall Inn in the gay village of Greenwich Village, Lower Manhattan, site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots, the cradle of the modern LGBT rights movement
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The main laboratory building of the IBM Watson Research Center is located in Yorktown Heights, New York.
Times Square in Midtown Manhattan, hub of the Broadway theater district, a media center, and one of the world's busiest pedestrian intersections
"I Love New York"
CMA CGM Theodore Roosevelt, the largest container ship to enter the Port of New York and New Jersey as of September7, 2017
Harris Hall of the City College of New York, a public college of the City University of New York
Butler Library at Columbia University
University of Rochester
South campus of the University at Buffalo, the flagship of the State University of New York
The New York City Subway is one of the world's busiest, serving more than five million passengers per average weekday.
Grand Central Terminal in New York City
John F. Kennedy Airport in Queens, the busiest international air passenger gateway to the United States
The New York State Capitol in Albany
New York State Court of Appeals
Kirsten Gillibrand and Chuck Schumer, New York's U.S. Senators
Kathy Hochul (D), the 57th Governor of New York
Yankee Stadium in The Bronx
Koppen climate of New York

The 1797 Montauk Lighthouse, commissioned under President George Washington, is a major tourist attraction in Montauk Point State Park at the easternmost tip of Long Island.