A report on President of the United States

George Washington, the first president of the United States
President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivers a radio address, 1933
President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1964 Civil Rights Act as Martin Luther King Jr. and others look on
President Donald Trump delivers his 2018 State of the Union Address, with Vice President Mike Pence and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan
President George H. W. Bush and Russian President Gorbachev sign the 1990 Chemical Weapons Accord in the White House.
Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, successfully preserved the Union during the American Civil War.
President Barack Obama with his Supreme Court appointee Justice Sotomayor, 2009
President Ronald Reagan reviews honor guards during a state visit to China, 1984
President Woodrow Wilson throws out the ceremonial first ball on Opening Day, 1916
President Jimmy Carter (left) debates Republican nominee Ronald Reagan on October 28, 1980.
Map of the United States showing the number of electoral votes allocated following the 2010 census to each state and the District of Columbia for the 2012, 2016 and 2020 presidential elections; it also notes that Maine and Nebraska distribute electors by way of the congressional district method. 270 electoral votes are required for a majority out of 538 votes possible.
Franklin D. Roosevelt won a record four presidential elections (1932, 1936, 1940 and 1944), leading to the adoption of a two-term limit.
President William McKinley and his successor, Theodore Roosevelt
President Reagan surrounded by Secret Service
From left: George H. W. Bush, Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and Jimmy Carter. Photo taken in the Oval Office on January 7, 2009; Obama formally took office thirteen days later.
Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George H.W. Bush, and Jimmy Carter at the dedication of the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas, 2013
White House, the official residence
Camp David, the official retreat
Blair House, the official guest house
The presidential limousine, dubbed "The Beast"
The presidential plane, called Air Force One when the president is on board
Marine One helicopter, when the president is aboard

Head of state and head of government of the United States of America.

- President of the United States

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Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

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Presiding officer of the United States Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS).

Presiding officer of the United States Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS).

Outgoing Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Richard Myers swears in the incoming chairman, General Peter Pace as President George W. Bush and Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld look on at the change of command ceremony at Fort Myer, Virginia on September 30, 2005.
General George S. Brown is sworn in as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff by Department of Defense General Counsel Martin Hoffman in the Pentagon on July 1, 1974.
General Nathan F. Twining is sworn in as the third chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, 1957.
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Nathan F. Twining at a NATO conference in Paris, France.
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General George S. Brown during a press conference at the White House in 1975.
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General George S. Brown with Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld.
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General David C. Jones with National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski and Deputy National Security Advisor David Aaron during a National Security Council meeting at the White House on December 20, 1978.
General David C. Jones, the ninth chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, presides over a JCS meeting with the commanders of unified and specified commands in the Gold Room, also known as "The Tank", on January 15, 1981.
The Joint Chiefs of Staff in 1981.
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General David C. Jones with former chairman Omar Bradley on January 20, 1981.
General Hugh Shelton hosting a conference in the Pentagon for former chairmen of the Joint Chiefs of Staff on December 1, 2000.<ref>Standing from left to right are: Gen. Colin L. Powell, USA (Ret); Gen. John W. Vessey, USA (Ret); Adm. Thomas H. Moorer, USN (Ret); Gen. Shelton, USA; Gen. David C. Jones, USAF (Ret); Adm. William J. Crowe, Jr., USN (Ret); and Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, USA (Ret).</ref>
The Joint Chiefs of Staff photographed in "The Tank," in the Pentagon in 2001.
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Richard B. Myers delivers opening remarks during a town hall meeting at the Pentagon.
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Richard B. Myers with Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld during a press conference at the Pentagon on September 20, 2003.
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Peter Pace testifies before the Senate Armed Services Committee on June 29, 2005.
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Peter Pace and his wife, Lynne, applaud the military demonstrations at Lowe's Motor Speedway in Charlotte, North Carolina on May 27, 2007.
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Michael Mullen with former chairmen Richard B. Myers and Peter Pace in 2009.
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Michael Mullen speaking at Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota on February 18, 2009.
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Michael Mullen with Secretary of Defense Robert Gates.
General Mark A. Milley is sworn in as the 20th chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff by General Joseph Dunford, the outgoing chairman, in a ceremony at Joint Base Myer–Henderson Hall, September 30, 2019.

The chairman is the highest-ranking and most senior military officer in the United States Armed Forces and the principal military advisor to the president, the National Security Council, the Homeland Security Council, and the secretary of defense.

First day of the House Judiciary Committee's formal impeachment hearings against President Nixon, May 9, 1974

Impeachment process against Richard Nixon

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The impeachment process against Richard Nixon began in the United States House of Representatives on October 30, 1973, following the series of high-level resignations and firings widely called the "Saturday Night Massacre" during the course of the Watergate scandal.

The impeachment process against Richard Nixon began in the United States House of Representatives on October 30, 1973, following the series of high-level resignations and firings widely called the "Saturday Night Massacre" during the course of the Watergate scandal.

First day of the House Judiciary Committee's formal impeachment hearings against President Nixon, May 9, 1974
Demonstrators in Washington, D.C., demanding that Congress impeach President Nixon, following the "Saturday Night Massacre"
Secretary of State Kissinger, President Nixon, vice-presidential nominee Ford, and White House Chief of Staff Haig in the Oval Office, October 1973
Judiciary Committee Chairman Rodino (center-left) and Special Counsel Doar speaking with reporters, January 24, 1974
President Nixon just prior to announcing his intention to release edited transcripts of the subpoenaed White House tapes, April 29, 1974
Peter Rodino, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee
Members and staff of the House Judiciary Committee in 1974
The Judiciary Committee's impeachment hearings received intense press attention. Portions were broadcast live on television.
Representative Barbara Jordan (left) became nationally known for her eloquence during the Judiciary Committee's impeachment hearings.
Senators Scott and Goldwater and Representative Rhodes hold an informal press conference following their August7 meeting with the president
President Nixon and the first lady (in pink) leave the White House, accompanied by Vice President Ford and the second lady, August 9, 1974, shortly before Nixon's resignation became effective

The House Committee on the Judiciary set up an impeachment inquiry staff and began investigations into possible impeachable offenses by Richard Nixon, the 37th president of the United States.

Peas, the turkey pardoned by President Donald Trump in 2018

National Thanksgiving Turkey Presentation

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Ceremony that takes place at the White House every year shortly before Thanksgiving.

Ceremony that takes place at the White House every year shortly before Thanksgiving.

Peas, the turkey pardoned by President Donald Trump in 2018
"If they'd given me a different answer on Charlie and his future, I would have pardoned him." ―Ronald Reagan, 1987.
President Harry Truman receiving a turkey (this one a Bronze) from the turkey industry, 1949
President John F. Kennedy spares the turkey presented to him, 1963, only three days before his assassination
President Lyndon Johnson accepting a non-pardoned turkey, 1967
President Richard Nixon sparing the turkey presented to him, 1971
First Lady Pat Nixon accepting a turkey on behalf of her husband, 1973
President Gerald Ford accepting a non-pardoned turkey, 1975
President Ronald Reagan accepting a turkey, 1983
President George H.W. Bush at the 3rd annual pardoning of the Thanksgiving turkey, 1991
President Bill Clinton at the 11th annual pardoning of the Thanksgiving turkey, 1999
President George W. Bush at the 20th annual pardoning of the Thanksgiving turkey, 2008
President Barack Obama pardoning a turkey called "Courage" on November 25, 2009
President Donald Trump pardoning a turkey called "Butter" on November 26, 2019
President Joe Biden pardoning a turkey called "Peanut Butter" on November 19, 2021

The president of the United States is presented with a live domestic turkey by the National Turkey Federation (NTF), usually males of the Broad Breasted White variety.

The Appointments Clause of the U.S. Constitution gives the U.S. Senate the right to confirm or reject the nomination of any officer of the United States.

Officer of the United States

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Functionary of the executive or judicial branches of the federal government of the United States to whom is delegated some part of the country's sovereign power.

Functionary of the executive or judicial branches of the federal government of the United States to whom is delegated some part of the country's sovereign power.

The Appointments Clause of the U.S. Constitution gives the U.S. Senate the right to confirm or reject the nomination of any officer of the United States.
Barack Obama signs the commission document investing Elena Kagan as an officer of the United States in 2010, specifically as a justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.
Military officers, like Vice Admiral James Stockdale, are considered officers of the United States.
The Federal Communications Commission pictured in 1937. Each of the commissioners is an officer of the United States by virtue of their authority to discharge part of the sovereign power of the U.S., specifically, regulation of radio waves.
Commission for Philip Habib for his trip as Special Representative of the President of the United States for the Middle East in 1982, signed by President Ronald Reagan and Secretary of State George P. Shultz.
The commission issued to a U.S. Vice Consul in 2012.

Under the Appointments Clause of the Constitution, the principal officers of the United States, such as federal judges, ambassadors, and "public Ministers" (Cabinet members) are appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate, but Congress may "vest the Appointment of such inferior Officers as they think proper, in the President alone, in the Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments."

Clinton v. City of New York

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Clinton v. City of New York, 524 U.S. 417 (1998), is a legal case in which the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that the line-item veto as granted in the Line Item Veto Act of 1996 violated the Presentment Clause of the United States Constitution because it impermissibly gave the President of the United States the power to unilaterally amend or repeal parts of statutes that had been duly passed by the United States Congress.

Imperial presidency

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Imperial presidency is a term applied to the modern presidency of the United States.

Unitary executive theory

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The unitary executive theory is a theory of United States constitutional law which holds that the President of the United States possesses the power to control the entire federal executive branch.

The United States Capitol dome as seen from the Supreme Court Building

Separation of powers under the United States Constitution

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Political doctrine originating in the writings of Charles de Secondat, Baron de Montesquieu in The Spirit of the Laws, in which he argued for a constitutional government with three separate branches, each of which would have defined abilities to check the powers of the others.

Political doctrine originating in the writings of Charles de Secondat, Baron de Montesquieu in The Spirit of the Laws, in which he argued for a constitutional government with three separate branches, each of which would have defined abilities to check the powers of the others.

The United States Capitol dome as seen from the Supreme Court Building
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Grover Cleveland worked to restore power to the Presidency after Andrew Johnson's impeachment.

Executive power is vested, with exceptions and qualifications, in the President.

President Donald Trump displaying Executive Order 13799

Presidential directive

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President Donald Trump displaying Executive Order 13799
NSDD 14, when it was partially declassified. The directive is now declassified in full.

A presidential directive, or executive action, is a written or oral instruction or declaration issued by the president of the United States, which may draw upon the powers vested in the president by the U.S. Constitution, statutory law, or, in certain cases, congressional and judicial acquiescence.

Line Item Veto Act of 1996

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The Line Item Veto Act was a federal law of the United States that granted the President the power to line-item veto budget bills passed by Congress, but its effect was brief as the act was soon ruled unconstitutional by the Supreme Court in Clinton v. City of New York.