Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a MovieOutstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or MovieOutstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or MovieOutstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a MovieOutstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a SpecialPrimetime Emmy AwardOutstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or a SpecialOutstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Television MovieEmmy AwardPrimetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress – Miniseries or a Movie
The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie is an award presented annually by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (ATAS).wikipedia
584 Related Articles

Mare Winningham

Regina King, Jane Alexander, Judy Davis, Colleen Dewhurst, and Mare Winningham have each won two awards.
An eight-time Emmy Award nominee, she won [[Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie|Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie]] for Amber Waves in 1980 and George Wallace in 1998.

Juliet Mills

JulietJuliette Mills
The award was first presented at the 27th Primetime Emmy Awards on May 19, 1975, to Juliet Mills for her role as Samantha Cody in QB VII.
She won an Emmy Award for her performance in the television miniseries QB VII (1974).

58th Primetime Emmy Awards

2006(58th)2006 Primetime Emmy Awards
The award ceremony garnered criticism during the 58th Primetime Emmy Awards when Ellen Burstyn received a nomination for her work in Mrs. Harris (2005), despite having 14 seconds of screen time and 38 words of dialogue.
Ellen Burstyn was nominated for [[Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie|Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie]] for her role in Mrs. Harris, even though she was onscreen for only fourteen seconds, which caused controversy.

Jane Alexander

Jane Quigley
Regina King, Jane Alexander, Judy Davis, Colleen Dewhurst, and Mare Winningham have each won two awards.
She has won two Emmys for [[Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie|Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie]] for Playing for Time (1980) and Warm Springs (2005).

Regina King

Regina
Regina King, Jane Alexander, Judy Davis, Colleen Dewhurst, and Mare Winningham have each won two awards.
From 2015 to 2017, King starred in the ABC anthology series American Crime, for which she won two [[Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie|Primetime Emmy Awards]], and in 2018, she starred in the Netflix miniseries Seven Seconds, for which she won her third Emmy Award.

Lilia Skala

During her career, Skala was also nominated for two Golden Globe Awards and a [[Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie|Primetime Emmy Award]].

Ellen Burstyn

The award ceremony garnered criticism during the 58th Primetime Emmy Awards when Ellen Burstyn received a nomination for her work in Mrs. Harris (2005), despite having 14 seconds of screen time and 38 words of dialogue.
In 2006, she was nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Mini-Series or Movie for a role credited as "Former Tarnower Steady" in HBO's Mrs. Harris, another biopic about Jean Harris.

Judy Davis

Regina King, Jane Alexander, Judy Davis, Colleen Dewhurst, and Mare Winningham have each won two awards.
Her international film career began when she played the younger version of Ingrid Bergman's Golda Meir in the television docudrama A Woman Called Golda (1981), a role for which she was nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress – Miniseries or a Movie, followed by the role of a terrorist in the British film Who Dares Wins (1982).

Eleanor and Franklin

Eleanor & FranklinEleanor and Franklin: The Story of Their Relationship, Based on Eleanor Roosevelt's Private Papers
The film won numerous awards, including 11 Primetime Emmy Awards (Outstanding Television Made and [[Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie|Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Television Movie]] for Rosemary Murphy), the Golden Globe Award for Best TV Movie, and the Peabody Award.

Claudette Colbert

ColbertSee below
For her television work in The Two Mrs. Grenvilles (1987), she won a [[Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film|Golden Globe Award]] and received an [[Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie|Emmy Award]] nomination.

Roxana Zal

She won a [[Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie|Primetime Emmy Award]] for her role in the 1984 TV movie Something About Amelia.

Colleen Dewhurst

Regina King, Jane Alexander, Judy Davis, Colleen Dewhurst, and Mare Winningham have each won two awards.

Kim Stanley

She received a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress – Miniseries or a Movie for her performance as Big Mama in a television adaptation of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof in 1985.

Kathy Bates

BatesKathleen Doyle "Kathy" Bates
Kathy Bates is the most nominated actress in the category, with seven nominations.
In 1996, Bates received her first Emmy Award nomination for [[Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie|Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie]], for her performance as Jay Leno's manager Helen Kushnick in HBO's The Late Shift (1996).

Mrs. Harris

The award ceremony garnered criticism during the 58th Primetime Emmy Awards when Ellen Burstyn received a nomination for her work in Mrs. Harris (2005), despite having 14 seconds of screen time and 38 words of dialogue.
Her performance, which consists of two lines of dialogue totaling 38 words and lasts 14 seconds, was nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie.

Shirley Knight

For the latter, she won both the Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie and the [[Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television]].

Something About Amelia

It received eight Emmy nominations in 1984, and won in three categories, for Outstanding Drama/Comedy Special (Leonard Goldberg / Michele Rappaport), [[Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie|Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series]] (Roxana Zal) and for [[Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special|Outstanding Writing in a Limited Series or a Special]] (William Hanley).

Diana Scarwid

She earned an Academy Award nomination for her performance in the 1980 film Inside Moves, and an [[Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie|Emmy Award]] nomination for her work in the television film Truman (1995).

Those She Left Behind

Co-star Colleen Dewhurst won a 1989 Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress - Miniseries or a Movie.

Miss Rose White

The production received five Emmy Awards, including Outstanding Television Movie and [[Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie|Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Television Movie]] (Plummer), as well as the Humanitas Prize in the 90 minute category.

The Woman He Loved

Jane Seymour was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film at the 46th Golden Globe Awards and Olivia de Havilland was nominated for a [[Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie]].

Lisa Jacobs (actress)

Lisa Jacobs Lisa JacobsLisa Jacobs (actor)
She was nominated for the [[Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie]] for her role in this movie.