Primeval history

first chapters of Genesisfirst eleven chaptersThe Early Narratives of Genesis
The primeval history, the name given by biblical scholars to the first eleven chapters of the Book of Genesis, is a story of the first years of the world's existence.wikipedia
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Book of Genesis

GenesisGen.Gen
The primeval history, the name given by biblical scholars to the first eleven chapters of the Book of Genesis, is a story of the first years of the world's existence. Scholars generally agree that the Torah, the collection of five books of which Genesis is the first, achieved something like its current form in the 5th century BCE.
It can be divided into two parts, the Primeval history (chapters 1–11) and the Ancestral history (chapters 12–50).

Adam and Eve

AdamEveAdam, Eve
It tells how God creates the world and all its beings and places the first man and woman (Adam and Eve) in his Garden of Eden, how the first couple are expelled from God's presence, of the first murder which follows, and God's decision to destroy the world and save only the righteous Noah and his sons; a new humanity then descends from these sons and spreads throughout the world, but although the new world is as sinful as the old God has resolved never again to destroy the world by flood, and the history ends with Terah, the father of Abraham, from whom will descend God's chosen people.
Adam and Eve are figures from the primeval history (Genesis 1 to 11), the Bible's mythic history of the first years of the world's existence.

Cain and Abel

CainAbelCain's murder of Abel
Cain and Abel and the first murder
Like almost all of the persons, places and stories in the Primeval history (the first eleven chapters of Genesis), they are mentioned nowhere else in the Hebrew Bible, a fact that suggests that the History is a late composition attached to Genesis to serve as an introduction.

Genesis flood narrative

Great FloodFloodDeluge
the Genesis flood narrative - the world destroyed and re-created The myth of Atrahasis, for example, was the first to record a Great Flood, and lies behind the story of Noah's flood The following table sets out the myths behind the various Biblical tropes.
The flood is part of what scholars call the primeval history, the first 11 chapters of Genesis.

Torah

LawPentateuchMosaic Law
Scholars generally agree that the Torah, the collection of five books of which Genesis is the first, achieved something like its current form in the 5th century BCE.
Genesis begins with the "primeval history" (Genesis 1–11 ), the story of the world's beginnings and the descent from Adam.

Genesis creation narrative

CreationGenesiscreation of the world
The Genesis creation narrative (the combined Hexameron or six-day cosmic creation-story of Genesis 1 and the human-focused creation-story of Genesis 2)
Primeval history

Jahwist

YahwistJJ corpus
Genesis draws on a number of distinct "sources", including the Priestly source, the Yahwist and the Elohist – the last two are often referred to collectively as "non-Priestly", but the Elohist is not present in the primeval history and "non-Priestly" and "Yahwist" can be regarded here as interchangeable terms.
These chapters make up the so-called Primeval History, the story of mankind prior to Abraham, and J and P provide roughly equal amounts of material.

Garden of Eden

EdenEdenicParadise
It tells how God creates the world and all its beings and places the first man and woman (Adam and Eve) in his Garden of Eden, how the first couple are expelled from God's presence, of the first murder which follows, and God's decision to destroy the world and save only the righteous Noah and his sons; a new humanity then descends from these sons and spreads throughout the world, but although the new world is as sinful as the old God has resolved never again to destroy the world by flood, and the history ends with Terah, the father of Abraham, from whom will descend God's chosen people.

Toledot

Genesis 25Parashat Toledot
The history contains some of the best-known stories in the Bible plus a number of genealogies, structured around the five-fold repetition of the toledot formula ("These are the generations of..."):

Hexameron

six daysHexaemeronhexameral
The Genesis creation narrative (the combined Hexameron or six-day cosmic creation-story of Genesis 1 and the human-focused creation-story of Genesis 2)

Genealogies of Genesis

Table of Nationsbiblicalbiblical genealogies
the first of two genealogies of Genesis, the Kenites, descendants of Cain, who invent various aspects of civilised life

Kenite

Keni
the first of two genealogies of Genesis, the Kenites, descendants of Cain, who invent various aspects of civilised life

Seth

Nabi ShittNabi Shiyt (Prophet Seth)Set
the second genealogy, the descendants of Seth the third son of Adam, whose line leads to Noah and to Abraham

Sons of God

Bene Elohimb e ne ElohimBene Elim/Bene Elohim
the Sons of God who couple with the "daughters of men"; the Nephelim, "men of renown"; God's reasons for destroying the world (first account)

Nephilim

giants1/2 angelEmim
the Sons of God who couple with the "daughters of men"; the Nephelim, "men of renown"; God's reasons for destroying the world (first account)

Seven Laws of Noah

7 Laws of NoahNoahide lawsNoachide laws
God's covenant with Noah, in which God promises never again to destroy the world by water

Generations of Noah

sons of NoahTable of Nationsfourth son of Noah
the Table of Nations (the sons of Noah and the origins of the nations of the world) and how they came to be scattered across the Earth through the Tower of Babel)

Tower of Babel

Babelconfusion of tonguesthe Tower of Babel
the Table of Nations (the sons of Noah and the origins of the nations of the world) and how they came to be scattered across the Earth through the Tower of Babel)

Terah

AzarAazarTa'rih
the descendants of Noah in the line of Shem to Terah, the father of Abraham

Abraham

IbrahimAbramAbraham the Patriarch
the descendants of Noah in the line of Shem to Terah, the father of Abraham

Priestly source

PriestlyPPriestly Writer
Genesis draws on a number of distinct "sources", including the Priestly source, the Yahwist and the Elohist – the last two are often referred to collectively as "non-Priestly", but the Elohist is not present in the primeval history and "non-Priestly" and "Yahwist" can be regarded here as interchangeable terms.

Elohist

EElohist (E)
Genesis draws on a number of distinct "sources", including the Priestly source, the Yahwist and the Elohist – the last two are often referred to collectively as "non-Priestly", but the Elohist is not present in the primeval history and "non-Priestly" and "Yahwist" can be regarded here as interchangeable terms.

John Van Seters

Just how late is a subject for debate: at one extreme are those who see it as a product of the Hellenistic period in which case it cannot be earlier than the first decades of the 4th century BCE; on the other hand the Yahwist source has been dated by some scholars, notably John Van Seters, to the exilic pre-Persian period (the 6th century BCE) precisely because the primeval history contains so much Babylonian influence in the form of myth.

Atra-Hasis

Atra-Hasis EpicAtrahasisAtra-ḫasis
The myth of Atrahasis, for example, was the first to record a Great Flood, and lies behind the story of Noah's flood The following table sets out the myths behind the various Biblical tropes.

Enûma Eliš

Babylonian Epic of CreationEnuma ElishBabylonian creation myth