Prince-Bishopric of Trent

Bishopric of TrentTrentBishop of TrentBishop of TrentoPrince-Bishop of TrentoBishopric of TrentoPrince-Bishop of TrentBishops of TrentPrince-Bishopric of TrentoPrince-Bishops of Trento
The Prince-Bishopric of Trent (Hochstift Trient, Fürstbistum Trient, Bistum Trient), was an ecclesiastical principality roughly corresponding to the present-day Northern Italian autonomous province of Trentino.wikipedia
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County of Tyrol

TyrolTyroleanTirol
It was created in 1027 and existed until 1802, when it was secularised and absorbed into the County of Tyrol held by the House of Habsburg. Following the 1801 Treaty of Lunéville, the prince-bishopric in 1803 was secularized as the Principality of Trent, later part of the County of Tyrol, an Alpine crown land of the Austrian Empire from 1804.
In 1804 the Princely County of Tyrol, unified with the secularised Prince-Bishoprics of Trent and Brixen, became a crown land of the Austrian Empire in 1804 and from 1867 a Cisleithanian crown land of Austria-Hungary.

Trentino

TrentoProvince of TrentoAutonomous Province of Trento
The Prince-Bishopric of Trent (Hochstift Trient, Fürstbistum Trient, Bistum Trient), was an ecclesiastical principality roughly corresponding to the present-day Northern Italian autonomous province of Trentino.
In 1027, the Bishopric of Trent was established as a State of the Holy Roman Empire by Emperor Conrad II.

Vigilius of Trent

Saint VigiliusSt. VigiliusVigilius
In order to state in a definitive way his authority he also collected all the official documents certificating the bishop's authority in the so-called Book of St Vigilius (Codex Wangianus), Vigilius being the patron saint of Trento.
Saint Vigilius of Trent (San Vigilio di Trento) is venerated as the patron saint and first bishop of Trent.

Bolzano

BozenBolzano, ItalyBolzano-Bozen
The princes of Trento maintained a strong allegiance to the Emperor, even when the latter was excommunicated: this because they need his protection against the growing power of subjects like the counts of Tyrol, who controlled the area around Bozen, those of Eppan, and others.
In 1027 the area of Bolzano and the rest of the diocese was conferred, by the emperor Conrad II from the Salian dynasty, upon the bishops of Trent.

History of Bavaria

BavariaBavarianBavarian history
Originally a Bavarian fief, by 1027 the prince-bishopric was established, together with the similar Prince-Bishopric of Brixen.
In 1027 AD, Conrad II split off the Bishopric of Trent from the former Lombard Kingdom of Italy.

Trento

TrentTridentumTrento, Italy
Trent was a Hochstift, an Imperial State under the authority of a prince-bishop at Trento.
In 1027, Emperor Conrad II created the Prince-Bishops of Trento, who wielded both temporal and religious powers.

Federico Wanga

Federico VangaFrederick of TrentFrederick von Wangen
The principate was reorganized and reformed by bishop Federico Wanga (1207–18), a relative of Emperor Otto IV.
Federico Vanga (or Wanga) (German: Friedrich von Wangen) (died 1218) was Prince-Bishop of Trento from August 9, 1207 until his death.

Prince-bishop

prince-bishopricPrince BishopPrince-Archbishop
Trent was a Hochstift, an Imperial State under the authority of a prince-bishop at Trento.

March of Verona

Margrave of VeronaVeronaMarca Veronensis et Aquileiensis
In 952 Berengar had to cede the March of Verona to Otto, who enfeoffed his younger brother Duke Henry I of Bavaria.
From 1004 King Henry II of Germany, having prevailed as King of Italy against Arduin of Ivrea, allotted several Veronese territories in the Adige Valley around Trento (Trient) to the Bishops of Trent.

Prince-Bishopric of Brixen

BrixenBishopric of BrixenBishop of Brixen
Originally a Bavarian fief, by 1027 the prince-bishopric was established, together with the similar Prince-Bishopric of Brixen.
This accounts for the fact that during the difficulties between the Papacy and the Empire, the Bishops of Brixen like the neighbouring Trent bishops generally took the part of the emperors.

Meinhard, Duke of Carinthia

Meinhard IIMeinhard II of Gorizia-TyrolMeinhard II of Tyrol
Count Meinhard II of Tyrol (1258–1295), also Duke of Carinthia from 1286, totally subjected the bishops of Trento and Brixen under his power, and reorganized his new state along the more modern lines inspired to those of other Italian principalities.
The count struggled to acquire the lordship over the Prince-Bishoprics of Trento and Brixen, extended his Tyrolean lands down the Adige River to Salorno, and also acquired several territories in the Inn valley including the important salt mines around Hall.

Bernardo Clesio

Bernhard von ClesBernardo III ClesioBernardus Clesius
The rebels, however, lacked organisation and were easily suppressed in 1526 by Austrian mercenaries and by the bishop Bernardo Clesio, who ferociously exterminated them in the battles of the Eisack valley and Sterzing.
Born in Cles, in the Prince-Bishopric of Trent, today Trentino, he graduated from the University of Bologna.

Rovereto

Rovereto, ItalyRofreitSacco di Rovereto
His personal charisma reverted the subalterne status of the Trento state between the Habsburg territories, gaining the seignory of Castelbarco and Rovereto.
Rovereto was an ancient fortress town standing at the frontier between the bishopric of Trento – an independent state until 1797 – and the republic of Venice, and later between Austrian Tyrol and Italy.

Carlo Emanuele Madruzzo

Carlo EmanueleCarlo Emanuele von Madruzzo
The principality was held by the Madruzzo family (who also indirectly controlled Brixen) until 1658, with the death of Carlo Emanuele.
Carlo Emanuele Madruzzo (5 November 1599 – 15 December 1658) was the prince-bishop of Trento from January 1629 until his death.

Cristoforo Madruzzo

MadruzzoCardinal MadruzzoChristoph Madruscht
Under Clesio's rule Trento was renovated with a new urbanistic asset, and a new great church, S. Maria Maggiore: these were needed in order to host the important and influential Council of Trent (1545–63), and, after the sudden death of Clesio in 1539, were completed by his successor, cardinal Cristoforo Madruzzo.
He studied at Padua and Bologna, received in 1529 from his older brother a canonicate at Trento and the parish of Tirol near Meran, was in 1536 a Canon of Salzburg, in 1537 of Brixen, and in 1539 became Prince-Bishop of Trento.

List of Prince-Bishops of Trent

Prince-Bishop of TrentBishop of TrentBishops of Trent
The Prince-bishops of Trent (German title Fürstbischof zu Trient) were the leader of the independent Bishopric of Trent, an ecclesiastical state of the Holy Roman Empire of what is now northern Italy.

German mediatisation

mediatisedsecularisationGerman mediatization
Following the 1801 Treaty of Lunéville, the prince-bishopric in 1803 was secularized as the Principality of Trent, later part of the County of Tyrol, an Alpine crown land of the Austrian Empire from 1804.

Sigismund Francis, Archduke of Austria

Sigismund FrancisSigismund Francis of AustriaArchduke Sigismund Francis
Emperor Leopold I of Habsburg assigned therefore the principality to his cousin Archduke Sigismund Francis, regent of Tyrol and Further Austria.
In 1653, he became bishop of Gurk and in 1659 bishop of Trent.

Hochstift

ecclesiastical principalityArchmonasterybishoprics
The Prince-Bishopric of Trent (Hochstift Trient, Fürstbistum Trient, Bistum Trient), was an ecclesiastical principality roughly corresponding to the present-day Northern Italian autonomous province of Trentino. Trent was a Hochstift, an Imperial State under the authority of a prince-bishop at Trento.

Northern Italy

northernNorthern ItalianNorth
The Prince-Bishopric of Trent (Hochstift Trient, Fürstbistum Trient, Bistum Trient), was an ecclesiastical principality roughly corresponding to the present-day Northern Italian autonomous province of Trentino.

House of Habsburg

HabsburgHabsburgsHabsburg dynasty
It was created in 1027 and existed until 1802, when it was secularised and absorbed into the County of Tyrol held by the House of Habsburg.

Imperial Estate

Imperial StateStateImperial Estates
Trent was a Hochstift, an Imperial State under the authority of a prince-bishop at Trento.