A report on Prince Edward station

Station of the MTR rapid transit system in Hong Kong.

- Prince Edward station

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MTR

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Major public transport network serving :Hong Kong.

Major public transport network serving :Hong Kong.

"Preferred system" route map in 1970
Modified Initial System's route map
An Airport Express train
The Tseung Kwan O line was opened in 2002 to serve new housing developments. Pictured is Po Lam station, the northern terminus of the line.
The multiple cross-platform-interchange system between Tiu Keng Leng station and Yau Tong station
A Disneyland Resort line train at Disneyland Resort station
Maritime Square, one of the major properties financing the MTR
MTR's high-speed rail service was launched on 23 September 2018. The image shows an MTR Vibrant Express train at Guangzhou South railway station
The future MTR map once all current projects are completed
Development of Hong Kong's railways (MTR)
Schöma diesel locomotives as used by MTR for work trains
One of the double-decker feeder buses run by KMB
Compartment for new signalling equipment on an MTR train
MTR Headquarters Building, Telford Gardens
Platform screen doors at Tung Chung station
Live art performances in the subway connecting Hong Kong station and Central station
Mainland Chinese parallel traders outside Sheung Shui station
Citizens trying to stop the gate from closing at Kwun Tong station on 24 August 2019, when a protest has just started nearby. They were also demanding the senior management of MTR to come out and provide a valid reason for the closure of stations.
An MTR ticket gate with an Octopus reader
Ticket and add-value machines

The project added a 10.5 km section to the MTR system, from Prince Edward station to Tsuen Wan.

Aerial view of Mong Kok

Mong Kok

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Area in Kowloon, Hong Kong.

Area in Kowloon, Hong Kong.

Aerial view of Mong Kok
Argyle Street in Mong Kok
Ladies' Market
Sai Yeung Choi Street South
Fa Yuen Street
Flower Market Road
Grand Century Place. Mong Kok East station is visible at the bottom left. The area in the background is part of Kowloon City District.
Langham Place, 4th floor
Nos. 600–626 Shanghai Street
Mong Kok Stadium in 2011, after renovation
Traffic congestion in Mong Kok
Exit B1 of Prince Edward station, with Exit C1 across Prince Edward Road West

Yuen Po Street Bird Garden – Hundreds of songbirds in exquisitely crafted cages can be seen at this market. The garden is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and is located near Mong Kok Stadium, to the north of Mong Kok East station and east of Prince Edward station.

Mong Kok station

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MTR station in Mong Kok, Kowloon, Hong Kong.

MTR station in Mong Kok, Kowloon, Hong Kong.

Opposite-direction interchange of the same two lines takes place at Prince Edward and Yau Ma Tei.

Jordan section of Nathan Road, at its intersection with Austin Road

Nathan Road

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Main thoroughfare in Kowloon, Hong Kong, aligned south–north from Tsim Sha Tsui to Sham Shui Po.

Main thoroughfare in Kowloon, Hong Kong, aligned south–north from Tsim Sha Tsui to Sham Shui Po.

Jordan section of Nathan Road, at its intersection with Austin Road
Nathan Road in the 1920s (Cameron Road on right)
Saint Andrew's Church
Chungking Mansions
The old trees along the former Kowloon British School
Nathan Road, Jordan section.
Nathan Road Mong Kok Section during the 2014 Umbrella Movement
The southern end section of Nathan Road
KMB Enviro500 serving Route 1 on Nathan Road, Tsim Sha Tsui.
Exit A1 of Tsim Sha Tsui station on Nathan Road.
Kowloon Masjid and Islamic Centre.
Park Lane Shopper's Boulevard.
2008 Summer Olympics torch relay in front of the Former Kowloon British School.
Nathan Road, near Mong Kok.
Nathan Road, in the Prince Edward area.

Portions of the Kwun Tong and Tsuen Wan lines (Prince Edward, Mong Kok, Yau Ma Tei, Jordan and Tsim Sha Tsui) run underneath Nathan Road.

A train entering Kwun Tong station

Kwun Tong line

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Heavy-rail rapid transit line of the MTR network in Hong Kong, coloured green on the MTR map.

Heavy-rail rapid transit line of the MTR network in Hong Kong, coloured green on the MTR map.

A train entering Kwun Tong station
Geographically accurate map of the Kwun Tong line

At that point, Waterloo (present-day Yau Ma Tei) station became the terminus of the newly christened Kwun Tong line (until then, the line had no official name), and both Argyle and Prince Edward stations became cross-platform interchange stations with the new line.

The four cross-platform interchange stations in Taipei Metro, showing the tripartite-interchange system on the right

Cross-platform interchange

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Type of interchange between different lines at a metro station.

Type of interchange between different lines at a metro station.

The four cross-platform interchange stations in Taipei Metro, showing the tripartite-interchange system on the right
Double cross platform interchange looking from one train through another train (which has its doors open on both sides) to reveal a third train at in London
Cross-platform interchanges between different train categories in Xipu Railway Station, Chengdu. The double track of Line 2 of Chengdu Metro is in the middle, while the double tracks of national rail transport system (Chengdu–Dujiangyan intercity railway) are on both sides.
Yau Tong station cross-platform interchange
Putra Heights is an interchange station between 2 LRT lines-Sri Petaling Line and Kelana Jaya Line.
Bayfront interchange in Singapore
Guting Station, a main interchange station of Taipei Metro, provides cross-platform interchange between the Xindian Line (Green Line) and Zhonghe Xinlu Line (Orange Line) in Taipei, Taiwan.
Akasaka-mitsuke station track diagram, showing how cross-platform transfer works
Wuhan's paired cross-platform transfer
Cross-platform transfer at Finchley Road
Simplified diagram of a Cross-platform interchange at Oxford Circus tube station, between the Bakerloo line and the Victoria line
Kirkby railway station single-track railway interchange (former double-track railway
Kitay-gorod station, interchange signs
Signage for cross-platform transfer at Journal Square
Lionel-Groulx station in Montreal

In the Mass Transit Railway (MTR) system, cross-platform interchange stations first appeared at Mong Kok and Prince Edward stations in Kowloon when Tsuen Wan line was opened and took over the southern half of the Modified Initial System.

Prince Edward Road East in San Po Kong

Prince Edward Road

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East-west direction and linking Tai Kok Tsui, Mong Kok, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon City and San Po Kong .

East-west direction and linking Tai Kok Tsui, Mong Kok, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon City and San Po Kong .

Prince Edward Road East in San Po Kong
Prince Edward Road East in San Po Kong
Prince Edward Road West and Prince Edward Road East
Prince Edward Road West is often congested
Kai Tak Airport was next to Prince Edward Road

Prince Edward station and the Prince Edward area in Hong Kong are both named after Prince Edward Road, rather than Prince Edward himself.

An M-Train approaching Kwai Hing station

Tsuen Wan line

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One of the eleven lines of the metro network in Hong Kong's MTR.

One of the eleven lines of the metro network in Hong Kong's MTR.

An M-Train approaching Kwai Hing station
Platform screen doors in Central station on the Tsuen Wan line
Prince Edward station in Kowloon
Geographically accurate map of the Tsuen Wan line

10 May 1982: The line opened with service from Tsuen Wan to Lai King and then direct to Prince Edward station, which was opened as an interchange with the Kwun Tong line

Police used tear gas to disperse protesters gathering outside the Legislative Council Complex on 12 June 2019.

2019–2020 Hong Kong protests

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The Anti-Extradition Law Amendment Bill Movement, also known as the 2019 Hong Kong protests, or the 2019–2020 Hong Kong protests, were a series of demonstrations from 15 March 2019 in response to the introduction by the Hong Kong government of the Fugitive Offenders amendment bill on extradition.

The Anti-Extradition Law Amendment Bill Movement, also known as the 2019 Hong Kong protests, or the 2019–2020 Hong Kong protests, were a series of demonstrations from 15 March 2019 in response to the introduction by the Hong Kong government of the Fugitive Offenders amendment bill on extradition.

Police used tear gas to disperse protesters gathering outside the Legislative Council Complex on 12 June 2019.
Marco Leung Ling-kit on scaffolding at Pacific Place before he fell to his death on 15 June
Protesters briefly occupied the Legislative Council Complex on 1 July 2019.
Protesters pointing their laser pointers at a newspaper outside the Space Museum, mocking an earlier police demonstration that aimed to illustrate the danger of laser pointers, which was seized from an arrested student-union president
Tsang Chi-kin, 18, was shot in the chest by police in 2019
The police confronted the protesters at the entrance of the Chinese University of Hong Kong on 12 November 2019.
Protesters in Yau Ma Tei on 18 November 2019 as they attempted to breach the police's cordon line to break through to protesters trapped inside Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Protesters flood the streets during the New Year's march
The national security law banned anyone from shouting or displaying the slogan "Liberate Hong Kong, the revolution of our times", which has achieved mainstream adoption since July 2019.
Civic Party promoting the primaries as the democrats aspired to secure a majority in LegCo. Four candidates from the party were disqualified by the government.
Former lawmaker Nathan Law met with US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in July 2020, discussing matters concerning the national security law, the pro-democratic primaries, and the LegCo election.
White-clad men assaulted commuters and protesters with sticks inside Yuen Long station on 21 July 2019.
A subway near Tai Po Market station, dubbed the "Lennon Tunnel"
Black Bauhinia Flag, a variation of the flag of Hong Kong
Pepe the Frog became a symbol of resistance during the protests. "Give me Liberty or Give me Death!" alludes to Patrick Henry's speech in support of the American Revolution.
A Winnie the Pooh toy used to symbolise Xi Jinping with the Chinazi flag stuck on it and a swastika shaped Chinese Flag attached on its chest, used in the 1 December 2019 protests
Protesters adopted the black bloc method and wore helmets and respirators to protect themselves. Yellow hard hats became a symbol for the protest movement
A "smart" lamppost was destroyed by protesters on 24 August 2019, due to understanding that it could be used for surveillance
A water cannon truck firing blue-dyed liquid at protesters
A police officer firing tear gas canisters on 31 August 2019
A passerby was attacked by riot police in Tai Wai on 3 October 2019
Veby Mega Indah, an Indonesian journalist whose right eye was ruptured by a police baton round
Stand News journalist Gwyneth Ho was attacked by a stick-wielding man during the Yuen Long attack on 21 July 2019.
Police near Lan Kwai Fong, Central on 31 October 2019. Police were accused of obstructing reporters from taking photographs by shining flashlights at them.
Protest at the Hong Kong International Airport on 26 July 2019
District councillors collaborated with shops supporting the Yellow Economic Circle to organise a Lunar New Year Fair in Sai Ying Pun on 18 January 2020.
Elderly marching on 17 July 2019 to support young people's anti-extradition bill protests
Chief Executive Carrie Lam at the press conference with Secretary for Justice Teresa Cheng and Secretary for Security John Lee one day after the massive protest on 9 June 2019.
Activists including Joshua Wong and Nathan Law met House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi and Representative Chris Smith at the US Congress.

Several police operations, in particular in Prince Edward station where the Special Tactical Squad (STS) assaulted commuters on a train, were thought by protesters and pro-democrats to have disregarded public safety.