Prince Friedrich Karl of Prussia (1828–1885)

Prince Friedrich Karl of PrussiaPrince Frederick Charles of PrussiaPrince Friedrich KarlPrince Frederick CharlesFriedrich KarlFrederick CharlesFrederick Charles of PrussiaFrederich CharlesFrederick Charles, Prince of PrussiaFriedrich Carl
Prince Friedrich Karl of Prussia (20 March 1828 – 15 June 1885) was the son of Prince Charles of Prussia (1801–1883) and his wife, Princess Marie of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (1808–1877).wikipedia
157 Related Articles

Battle of Königgrätz

KöniggrätzBattle of SadowaSadowa
He defeated the Austrian army at the Battle of Königgrätz in 1866 and the French Army of the Rhine at the Battle of Mars-la-Tour, overseeing the extinction of the Army of the Rhine at the Siege of Metz in 1870.
Prussian artillery was ineffective and almost all of the fighting on the Prussian side was done by the First Army under Prince Friedrich Karl and one division from the Second Army.

Siege of Metz (1870)

Siege of MetzMetzbesieging Metz
He defeated the Austrian army at the Battle of Königgrätz in 1866 and the French Army of the Rhine at the Battle of Mars-la-Tour, overseeing the extinction of the Army of the Rhine at the Siege of Metz in 1870. The battle was followed by another victory at Gravelotte-St.Privat on 18 August and the encirclement and annihilation of the Army of the Rhine at the Siege of Metz.
The fortress was promptly surrounded by German forces under Prince Friedrich Karl of Prussia.

Battle of Mars-la-Tour

Mars-la-TourBattle of VionvilleMars la Tour
He defeated the Austrian army at the Battle of Königgrätz in 1866 and the French Army of the Rhine at the Battle of Mars-la-Tour, overseeing the extinction of the Army of the Rhine at the Siege of Metz in 1870. At the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War, the Prince was given command of the Second Army, and defeated the French Army of the Rhine at the Battle of Mars-la-Tour on 16 August 1870, cutting off its escape route to the west.
This intelligence prompted General Prince Friedrich Karl, commander of the Prussian Second Army, to order at 1900 on 15 August a grossly outnumbered group of 30,000 men of the advanced III Corps under General Constantin von Alvensleben to cut off the French line of retreat at Mars-la-Tour and Vionville.

Albrecht von Roon

RoonAlbrecht Graf von RoonAlbrecht Theodor Emil Graf von Roon
From 1842 to 1846, Frederick Charles was under the military tutelage of then major Albrecht von Roon.
In 1844, as tutor to Prince Friedrich Karl of Prussia, he attended the prince at Bonn University and in his European travels.

Princess Marie of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (1808–1877)

Princess Marie of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenacha Princess of WeimarMarie
Prince Friedrich Karl of Prussia (20 March 1828 – 15 June 1885) was the son of Prince Charles of Prussia (1801–1883) and his wife, Princess Marie of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (1808–1877).
Their son, Frederich Charles, was born 10 months later.

Prince Charles of Prussia

Prince CharlesCharlesKarl
Prince Friedrich Karl of Prussia (20 March 1828 – 15 June 1885) was the son of Prince Charles of Prussia (1801–1883) and his wife, Princess Marie of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (1808–1877).

Corps Borussia Bonn

Borussian KorpsCorps Borussia
He became a member of the Corps Borussia Bonn in 1847 and was awarded Prussia's Lifesaving Medal for rescuing a child from the Rhine the same year.

III Corps (German Empire)

III CorpsIII Army Corps3rd
As commander of III Army Corps from 1 July 1860 to 17 July 1870, the Prince implemented his reforms and turned his corps into a leader in Prussian military innovation.
The III Corps formed part of Prince Friedrich Karl of Prussia's 1st Army and fought in the Austro-Prussian War against Austria in 1866, including the Battle of Königgrätz.

II Corps (German Empire)

IIII CorpsII Army Corps
He served with distinction in the Austro-Prussian War, where he commanded the First Army; consisting of the II, III and IV corps.
The II Corps formed part of Prince Friedrich Karl of Prussia's 1st Army and fought in the Austro-Prussian War against Austria in 1866, including the Battle of Königgrätz.

IV Corps (German Empire)

IV CorpsIV Army CorpsIV
He served with distinction in the Austro-Prussian War, where he commanded the First Army; consisting of the II, III and IV corps.
The IV Corps formed part of Prince Friedrich Karl of Prussia's 1st Army and fought in the Austro-Prussian War against Austria in 1866, including the Battle of Königgrätz.

Prussian Army

Royal Prussian ArmyPrussianArmy
As a military commander, the Prince had a major influence on the Royal Prussian Army's advances in training and tactics in the 1850s and 1860s.
Although Moltke considered Prince Frederick Charles' march through Bohemia to be too slow, Hans Delbrück found the "Red Prince's" eventual attack at Königgrätz to have been in the Prussian tradition, "which, by daring to lose a battle, wins it".

Friedrich Graf von Wrangel

Friedrich von WrangelWrangelField Marshal Friedrich Graf von Wrangel
He served on Friedrich Graf von Wrangel's staff during the First Schleswig War of 1848.
Wrangel was too old for active work and often issued vague or impracticable orders; he had always desired that the young "Red Prince", Prince Frederick Charles of Prussia, should have the command.

Generalfeldmarschall

Field MarshalFeldmarschallGeneral Field Marshal
For his services he was promoted to the rank of Generalfeldmarschall.
In 1870 Prince Friedrich Karl of Prussia and Crown Prince Friedrich Wilhelm—who had commanded armies during the Franco-Prussian War—became the first Prussian princes appointed as field marshals.

Franco-Prussian War

Franco-German WarWar of 1870Franco Prussian War
At the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War, the Prince was given command of the Second Army, and defeated the French Army of the Rhine at the Battle of Mars-la-Tour on 16 August 1870, cutting off its escape route to the west.
Moltke had indeed massed three armies in the area—the Prussian First Army with 50,000 men, commanded by General Karl von Steinmetz opposite Saarlouis, the Prussian Second Army with 134,000 men commanded by Prince Friedrich Karl opposite the line Forbach-Spicheren, and the Prussian Third Army with 120,000 men commanded by Crown Prince Friedrich Wilhelm, poised to cross the border at Wissembourg.

Battle of Le Mans

Le Mansbattle at that place
He won battles at Orléans on 2 December and Le Mans from 10–12 January 1871.
The first French attempt to relieve Paris was defeated by the Germans at Orléans from 2 to 4 December by Prince Friedrich Karl of Prussia's Second Army.

Princess Elisabeth Anna of Prussia

Elisabeth AnnaElisabeth Anna of PrussiaElisabeth Anna, Grand Duchess of Oldenburg
She was the second child of Prince Frederick Charles of Prussia and Princess Maria Anna of Anhalt-Dessau.

Battle of Gravelotte

Gravelottebattle of 18 August 1870Battle of Saint-Privat
The battle was followed by another victory at Gravelotte-St.Privat on 18 August and the encirclement and annihilation of the Army of the Rhine at the Siege of Metz.
With the support of the Prussian II and Saxon XII Corps of Prince Friedrich Karl's Second Army, the Guards conquered St. Privat by 2000 after heavy losses, pushing back the French right wing.

Princess Marie of Prussia (1855–1888)

Princess Marie of PrussiaPrincess Marie Elisabeth Luise Friederike of PrussiaMarie Elisabeth Louise Frederica of Prussia
She was the daughter of Prince Frederick Charles of Prussia and later became second wife of Prince Henry of the Netherlands then the first wife of Prince Albert of Saxe-Altenburg.

Frederick Augustus II, Grand Duke of Oldenburg

Frederick Augustus IIFrederick AugustusFriedrich August
He married Princess Elisabeth Anna of Prussia, daughter of Princess Maria Anna of Anhalt-Dessau and Prince Frederick Charles of Prussia.

Antoine Chanzy

ChanzyAlfred ChanzyGeneral Chanzy
After the fall of Metz on 27 October, his army was sent to the Loire to clear the area around Orléans, where French armies, first under Aurelle de Paladines, then under Chanzy, were trying to march north to relieve Paris.
His enemies, Grand Duke Friedrich Franz II of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Prince Frederick Charles of Prussia, and General von der Tann, all regarded Chanzy as their most formidable opponent.

Prince Friedrich Leopold of Prussia

Friedrich LeopoldFriedrich Leopold of PrussiaPrince Friedrich Leopold
Joachim Karl Wilhelm Friedrich Leopold Prinz von Preußen (14 November 1865 in Berlin – 13 September 1931 Krojanke manor, Landkreis Flatow, Posen-West Prussia) was a son of Prince Frederick Charles of Prussia and Princess Maria Anna of Anhalt-Dessau, married in 1854.

Princess Louise Margaret of Prussia

Duchess of ConnaughtDuchess of Connaught and StrathearnLouise Margaret, Duchess of Connaught and Strathearn
Her father was Prince Friedrich Karl of Prussia (1828–1885), the son of Karl of Prussia (1801–1883) and his wife Princess Marie of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (1808–1877).

Battle of Dybbøl

DybbølDüppelBattle
Promoted to General der Kavallerie, the Prince took part in the Second Schleswig War of 1864 against Denmark, where he held command over the Prussian troops in the Austro-Prussian expeditionary force and defeated the Danes at the Battle of Dybbøl.

Princess Maria Anna of Anhalt-Dessau

Princess Maria AnnaMaria Anna, Princess Frederick Charles of PrussiaPrincess Frederick Charles of Prussia
On 29 November 1854 at Dessau he married Princess Maria Anna of Anhalt-Dessau (1837–1906), daughter of Leopold IV, Duke of Anhalt.
On 29 November 1854 she married her second cousin Prince Frederick Charles of Prussia.

Jagdschloss Glienicke

Glienicke Hunting LodgeGlienicke CastleJagdschloss Grunewald
He died of a heart attack at Jagdschloss Glienicke on 15 June 1885.
In 1859, the lodge was acquired by Prince Charles of Prussia, who hired the court architect Ferdinand von Arnim to renovate the castle in Neo-baroque style for his son Prince Frederick Charles.