Prince of Piedmont

Lord of PiedmontPiedmontPrincipality of PiedmontCount of PiedmontCountship of Piedmontheir to the throneLords and Princes of PiedmontLords of PiedmontPrince of Naples
The lordship, later principality of Piedmont (French: Piémont, Italian: Piemonte) was originally an appanage of the Savoyard county and as such its lords were members of the Achaea branch of the House of Savoy.wikipedia
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Thomas, Count of Flanders

Thomas II of SavoyThomasThomas II of Piedmont
1199, Montmélian – 7 February 1259) was the Lord of Piedmont from 1233 to his death, Count of Flanders jure uxoris from 1237 to 1244, and regent of the County of Savoy from 1253 to his death, while his nephew Boniface was fighting abroad.

House of Savoy

SavoyItalian Royal FamilySavoyard
The lordship, later principality of Piedmont (French: Piémont, Italian: Piemonte) was originally an appanage of the Savoyard county and as such its lords were members of the Achaea branch of the House of Savoy. The usage was retained when the House of Savoy became Kings of Italy, "Prince of Piedmont" becoming roughly equivalent to the British "Prince of Wales", the title bestowed to the Crown Prince.
Although the titles and distinctions of the Italian royal family are not legally recognised by the Italian Republic, the remaining members of the House of Savoy, like dynasties of other abolished monarchies, still use some of the various titles they acquired over the millennium of their reign prior to the republic's establishment, including Duke of Savoy, "Prince of Naples" previously conferred by Joseph Bonaparte to be hereditary on his children and grandchildren, Prince of Piedmont and Duke of Aosta.

Thomas III of Piedmont

Thomas III of SavoyThomas IIIThomas
1246 – 16 May 1282), called Thomas of Savoy or de Savoie, was the lord of Piedmont and a claimant to the county of Savoy from 1268.

Philip I of Piedmont

Philip of SavoyPhilip IFilippo d'Acaia
Philip I, known as Philip of Savoy (Philippe de Savoie, Filippo di Savoia-Acaia) (1278 – September 25, 1334) was the lord of Piedmont from 1282 until his death and prince of Achaea between 1301 and 1307.

James of Piedmont

JamesGiacomo of SavoyJames of Savoy-Achaea
James (16 January 1315 – 17 May 1367 ) was the Lord of Piedmont from 1334 to his death.

Crown prince

Crown PrincessHereditary Princecrown-prince
The usage was retained when the House of Savoy became Kings of Italy, "Prince of Piedmont" becoming roughly equivalent to the British "Prince of Wales", the title bestowed to the Crown Prince.

Amadeus, Prince of Achaea

Amadeo, Prince of AchaeaAmadeusAmadeo
In 1367, he succeeded his father in his titles of Lord of Piedmont and Prince of Achaea.

Louis of Piedmont

LouisLudovico di Savoia
Louis (1364 – 11 December 1418) was the Lord of Piedmont and titular Prince of Achaea from 1402.

Principality of Achaea

Prince of AchaeaAchaeaPrinces of Achaea
The lordship, later principality of Piedmont (French: Piémont, Italian: Piemonte) was originally an appanage of the Savoyard county and as such its lords were members of the Achaea branch of the House of Savoy.

Philip II of Piedmont

Philip IIPhilip
Philip II (1340 – 20 January 1368) was the Count of Piedmont and claimant to the Principality of Achaea briefly from 1367 to his death.

Victor Amadeus II of Sardinia

Victor Amadeus IIVictor Amadeus II of SavoyDuke of Savoy
As an infant he was styled as the Prince of Piedmont, traditional title of the heir apparent to the duchy of Savoy.

Francis Hyacinth, Duke of Savoy

Francis HyacinthPrince Francis HyacinthPrince Francis Hyacinth of Savoy
As the heir to the Savoyard throne, he was styled as the Prince of Piedmont.

Charles Emmanuel IV of Sardinia

Charles Emmanuel IVCharles Emmanuel IV of SavoyCharles Emmanuel
From his birth to his own succession to the throne of Sardinia in 1796, Charles Emmanuel was styled "Prince of Piedmont".

Umberto II of Italy

Umberto IIUmbertoUmberto di Savoia
He was accorded the title Prince of Piedmont, which was formalised by Royal Decree on 29 September.

French language

FrenchfrancophoneFrench-language
The lordship, later principality of Piedmont (French: Piémont, Italian: Piemonte) was originally an appanage of the Savoyard county and as such its lords were members of the Achaea branch of the House of Savoy.

Italian language

ItalianItalian-languageit
The lordship, later principality of Piedmont (French: Piémont, Italian: Piemonte) was originally an appanage of the Savoyard county and as such its lords were members of the Achaea branch of the House of Savoy.

Appanage

apanagesecundogenitureappanages
The lordship, later principality of Piedmont (French: Piémont, Italian: Piemonte) was originally an appanage of the Savoyard county and as such its lords were members of the Achaea branch of the House of Savoy.

County of Savoy

SavoyCounts of SavoyCount of Savoy
The lordship, later principality of Piedmont (French: Piémont, Italian: Piemonte) was originally an appanage of the Savoyard county and as such its lords were members of the Achaea branch of the House of Savoy.

Kingdom of Sardinia

SardiniaPiedmont-SardiniaKingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia
When the House of Savoy was given the Kingdom of Sardinia, the Savoyards used the style of Prince of Piedmont for their heir apparent.

Heir apparent

heir-apparentheirs apparentheir
When the House of Savoy was given the Kingdom of Sardinia, the Savoyards used the style of Prince of Piedmont for their heir apparent.

Monarchy of Italy

Kings of ItalyKingKing of Italy
The usage was retained when the House of Savoy became Kings of Italy, "Prince of Piedmont" becoming roughly equivalent to the British "Prince of Wales", the title bestowed to the Crown Prince.

Prince of Wales

The Prince of WalesPrinces of WalesPrince
The usage was retained when the House of Savoy became Kings of Italy, "Prince of Piedmont" becoming roughly equivalent to the British "Prince of Wales", the title bestowed to the Crown Prince.