Private (rank)

U.S. Army private E-2's insignia
Indonesian Army privates pose with two officers
OR-1 insignia
Military rank insignia of sotamies (private) of the Finnish Army and Air Force.
Private (Prajurit Dua)
Private First Class (Prajurit Satu)
Master Private (Prajurit Kepala)
<center>Private insignia
<center>Private insignia
Schütze, Kanonier, Jäger rank
Schütze, Kanonier, Jäger rank
Flieger rank
Schütze, Kanonier, Jäger Unteroffizieranwärter (UA) NCO-candidate rank
Matrose rank

Soldier of the lowest military rank .

- Private (rank)
U.S. Army private E-2's insignia

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A poster showing the rank insignia of the officers of several armed forces at the time of the Second World War.

Gunner (rank)

A poster showing the rank insignia of the officers of several armed forces at the time of the Second World War.

Gunner (Gnr) is a rank equivalent to private in the British Army Royal Artillery and the artillery corps of other Commonwealth armies.

Soldat de première classe

Private first class

Military rank held by junior enlisted personnel in some countries' armed forces.

Military rank held by junior enlisted personnel in some countries' armed forces.

Soldat de première classe
The Philippine Army private first class rank insignia.
Singaporean private first class rank insignia.
U.S. Army private first class insignia
U.S. Army private first class insignia (1920–1968)
U.S. Marine Corps private first class insignia.
Vietnam People's Army private first class insignia.

In the United States Marine Corps, the rank of private first class is the second lowest, just under lance corporal and just above Private, equivalent to NATO grade OR-2, being pay grade E-2.

Modern sapper equipment

Sapper

Combatant or soldier who performs a variety of military engineering duties, such as breaching fortifications, demolitions, bridge-building, laying or clearing minefields, preparing field defenses, and road and airfield construction and repair.

Combatant or soldier who performs a variety of military engineering duties, such as breaching fortifications, demolitions, bridge-building, laying or clearing minefields, preparing field defenses, and road and airfield construction and repair.

Modern sapper equipment
Soldiers of No 2 Field Company, Bombay Sappers and Miners on duty in China in 1900. The mule carries the tools required for field engineering tasks.
The fort of Ghazni which fell as a result of mining by a mixed contingent of the Bombay and Bengal Sappers during the First Afghan War on 23 July 1839.
A sapper of the Royal Engineers watches as soldiers reinforce security at FOB (Forward Operating Base) Shawqat in Afghanistan.
Jisr Benat Yakub repaired (September 1918)
Insignia of French military sappers
French Imperial Guard sappers, 1810
Sapeurs-pompiers de Paris (Paris Fire Brigade) on parade
US combat engineer setting a charge in World War II
Sapper formation- PAVN/Viet Cong

Sapper (abbreviated Spr) is the Royal Engineers' equivalent of private.

Army corporal

Corporal

Military rank in use in some form by many militaries and by some police forces or other uniformed organizations.

Military rank in use in some form by many militaries and by some police forces or other uniformed organizations.

Army corporal
100px
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PLA Corporal epaulet
Insignia of alikersantti
Insignia of alikersantti
IAF Corporal Arm Insignia
IDF Rank: רב טוראי Rav turai (Rabat)
Shoulder strap of a kapral in the Polish Army.
Singapore Armed Forces' Corporal Insignia
Onbaşı insignia
RAF corporal insignia.
RAF corporal as it appears on dress uniform.
Venezuelan insignia
Army - shoulder
Army - sleeve
Air Force - sleeve
Second Corporal/Lance Corporal
First Corporal/Corporal
Master Corporal
<center>Kabo
<center>Kabo
<center>Kabo
<center>Kabo
Spanish Army Cabo insignia.
Spanish Navy Cabo insignia.
Spanish Navy Marines Cabo insignia.
Spanish Air Force Cabo insignia.
Civil Guard Cabo insignia.

It is senior to the rank of private and its naval equivalent able seaman, and junior to master corporal (caporal-chef) and its equivalent master seaman (matelot-chef).

Hyder Ali as a sepoy

Sepoy

The Persian-derived designation originally given to a professional Indian infantryman, traditionally armed with a musket, in the armies of the Mughal Empire.

The Persian-derived designation originally given to a professional Indian infantryman, traditionally armed with a musket, in the armies of the Mughal Empire.

Hyder Ali as a sepoy
A Mughal sepoy, under the command of Mirza Najaf Khan.
The Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb leads his final expedition (1705), (sepoy column visible in the lower right).
Sepoy of the British Indian infantry, circa 1900 CE.
An early 20th century sepoy in the British Indian Army, wearing a kurta.

The term "sepoy" is still used in the modern Indian, Pakistan and Nepalese armies, where it denotes the rank of private.

Gravestone of Trooper G. Graham, Nottinghamshire Yeomanry.

Trooper (rank)

Trooper (abbr.

Trooper (abbr.

Gravestone of Trooper G. Graham, Nottinghamshire Yeomanry.

Tpr) from the French "troupier" is the equivalent rank to private in a regiment with a cavalry tradition in the British Army and many other Commonwealth armies, including those of Australia, Canada, South Africa and New Zealand; it is also used by the Irish Army.

Green jacketed British Army rifleman aiming a Baker rifle, c. 1803

Rifleman

Infantry soldier armed with a rifled long gun.

Infantry soldier armed with a rifled long gun.

Green jacketed British Army rifleman aiming a Baker rifle, c. 1803
A historical reenactment with the British 95th Rifles regiment.
Uniform of the Robin Hood Rifles depicted on a 1939 cigarette card
John Fitzgerald Kennedy, escorted by a Bermuda Militia Artillery officer in Royal Artillery blue No. 1 Dress, inspects green-uniformed riflemen of the Bermuda Rifles in 1961
Riflemen of the War of 1812 in green fringed hunting shirts. Officer and sergeant in regulation gray. A general staff officer stands in the left foreground; behind him a mounted general officer.

In many (particularly Commonwealth) armies, "rifleman" is a rank equivalent to private, abbreviated

Royal Australian Engineers

Military engineering corps of the Australian Army (although the word corps does not appear in their name or on their badge).

Military engineering corps of the Australian Army (although the word corps does not appear in their name or on their badge).

Engineers at Tarakan, 1945
An RAE sapper assigned to the International Stabilisation Force, Dili, Timor Leste, 2010
Sappers from 1 CER, 2009

The Royal Australian Engineers also adopted the Royal Engineers practice of calling their private soldiers "Sappers", in recognition of the fact that the very earliest engineers had been primarily concerned with driving saps (tunnels) both towards the enemy lines, and underneath fortifications.

Cap badge of the Corps of Royal Engineers

Royal Engineers

Corps of the British Army.

Corps of the British Army.

Cap badge of the Corps of Royal Engineers
Royal Engineers recruitment poster
Corps of Royal Engineers Cypher
The Royal Albert Hall, designed by Captain Francis Fowke RE
Drop Redoubt.
Pentonville Prison designed by Capt Joshua Jebb RE
1848 Woodcut of HMD Bermuda, Ireland Island, Bermuda.
Slip 7 at Chatham Dockyard, designed by Col. G. Greene RE
Slip 3 at Chatham Dockyard, designed and built by the Corps
ME – Fabricator in Iraq
ME – Armoured operating an AVRE in Canada
Combat Engineers prepare a bridge for demolition in Malaya.
Royal Engineers' Surveyors in Europe
Combat Engineers of 20 Field Squadron, 36 Engineer Regiment practice landmine clearance.
Armoured Vehicle Royal Engineers, Bobin, on D Day
RE Plant Operators construct foundations for a new bridge in Workington after floods
Sappers launching a Logistic Support Bridge at Workington in order to reduce effects of collapsed bridges
TROJAN AVRE with Full Width Mine Plough and Fascine.
HQ Royal School of Military Engineering.
Camp Gate Flag of the Royal Engineers
Royal Engineers' Ensign
Rochester Castle from across the Medway. Engraving from image by G.F. Sargent c1836.
Rochester Cathedral from the West
Musicians from the Band of the Corps of Royal Engineers during a Medals Parade for 32 Engineer Regiment.
The Ravelin Building at the Royal School of Military Engineering, Chatham, is now home to the Institution and the Corps Museum.
Un-defaced Blue Ensign flown by members of the REYC.
REYC Burgee.
The Royal Engineers pictured in 1872. Back: Merriman, Ord, Marindin, Addison, Mitchell; Front: Hoskyns, Renny-Tailyour, Creswell, Goodwyn, Barker, Rich.
Rorke's Drift, 22–23 January 1879, a battle fought under the command of Lt. John Chard, RE. Eleven Victoria Crosses were won during the battle, including one by Chard. Painting by Alphonse de Neuville

In 1787, the Corps of Engineers was granted the Royal prefix, and adopted its current name; in the same year, a Corps of Royal Military Artificers was formed, consisting of non-commissioned officers and privates, to be led by the Royal Engineers.

Badge of the Royal Air Force

Aircraftman

Lowest rank in the British Royal Air Force (RAF) and the air forces of several other Commonwealth countries.

Lowest rank in the British Royal Air Force (RAF) and the air forces of several other Commonwealth countries.

Badge of the Royal Air Force

This was changed from private in spring 2015 when the RCAF changed the colour of its rank insignia from gold to pearl grey.