Private Eye

Neasden F.C.Baldy" PevsnerDave SpartDave SpartsNeasdenNeasden Football ClubUniversity of Neasden
Private Eye is a British fortnightly satirical and current affairs news magazine, founded in 1961.wikipedia
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Ian Hislop

Hislop, Ian
It is published in London and has been edited by Ian Hislop since 1986. The gossip columnist Nigel Dempster wrote extensively for the magazine before he fell out with Ian Hislop and other writers, while Foot wrote on politics, local government and corruption.
Ian David Hislop (born 13 July 1960) is a British journalist, satirist, writer, broadcaster, and editor of the magazine Private Eye.

Willie Rushton

William Rushton
The forerunner of Private Eye was The Salopian, a school magazine published at Shrewsbury School in the mid-1950s and edited by Richard Ingrams, Willie Rushton, Christopher Booker and Paul Foot.
William George Rushton (18 August 1937 – 11 December 1996) was an English cartoonist, satirist, comedian, actor and performer who co-founded the satirical magazine Private Eye.

Richard Ingrams

The forerunner of Private Eye was The Salopian, a school magazine published at Shrewsbury School in the mid-1950s and edited by Richard Ingrams, Willie Rushton, Christopher Booker and Paul Foot.
Richard Reid Ingrams (born 19 August 1937 in Chelsea, London ) is an English journalist, a co-founder and second editor of the British satirical magazine Private Eye, and founding editor of The Oldie magazine.

Christopher Booker

Booker, C.
The forerunner of Private Eye was The Salopian, a school magazine published at Shrewsbury School in the mid-1950s and edited by Richard Ingrams, Willie Rushton, Christopher Booker and Paul Foot.
He was a founder and contributor of the satirical magazine Private Eye in 1961.

Auberon Waugh

AuberonAuberon Alexandertheir son
Others essential to the development of the magazine were Auberon Waugh, Claud Cockburn (who had run a pre-war scandal sheet, The Week), Barry Fantoni, Gerald Scarfe, Tony Rushton, Patrick Marnham and Candida Betjeman.
At twenty, he launched his journalism career at the Telegraph Group, and also wrote for many other publications including Private Eye, in which he presented a profile that was half Tory grandee and half cheeky rebel.

Paul Foot (journalist)

Paul FootFoot, PaulPaul
The forerunner of Private Eye was The Salopian, a school magazine published at Shrewsbury School in the mid-1950s and edited by Richard Ingrams, Willie Rushton, Christopher Booker and Paul Foot.
Contemporaries at Shrewsbury included Richard Ingrams, Willie Rushton, Christopher Booker and several other friends who would later become involved in Private Eye.

Not Private Eye

These include three issued by James Goldsmith (known in the magazine as "(Sir) Jammy Fishpaste") and several by Robert Maxwell (known as "Captain Bob"), one of which resulted in the award of costs and reported damages of £225,000, and attacks on the magazine by Maxwell through a book, Malice in Wonderland, and a one-off magazine, Not Private Eye.
Not Private Eye was a one-off spoof of the British satirical magazine Private Eye.

Nicholas Luard

After the magazine's initial success, more funding was provided by Nicholas Luard and Peter Cook, who ran The Establishment – a satirical nightclub – and Private Eye became a fully professional publication.
Nicholas Lamert Luard (26 June 1937 Hampstead, London – 25 May 2004 Kensington, London) was a writer and politician, but is perhaps best known for his activities in the early 1960s: co-founding The Establishment with Peter Cook and being one of the Lords Gnome of Private Eye.

Barry Fantoni

Others essential to the development of the magazine were Auberon Waugh, Claud Cockburn (who had run a pre-war scandal sheet, The Week), Barry Fantoni, Gerald Scarfe, Tony Rushton, Patrick Marnham and Candida Betjeman.
Barry Ernest Fantoni (born 28 February 1940) is an author, cartoonist and jazz musician of Italian and Jewish descent, most famous for his work with the magazine Private Eye, for whom he also created Neasden F.C. He has also published books on Chinese astrology.

Peter Cook

Derek and ClivePeter Cook & CoPeter Edward Cook
After the magazine's initial success, more funding was provided by Nicholas Luard and Peter Cook, who ran The Establishment – a satirical nightclub – and Private Eye became a fully professional publication.
Around this time, Cook provided financial backing for the satirical magazine Private Eye, supporting it through difficult periods, particularly in libel trials.

Prime Minister parodies (Private Eye)

Mrs Wilson's DiaryMrs Wilson’s DiaryMrs. Wilson's Diary
A series of parody columns referencing the Prime Minister of the day has been a long-term feature of Private Eye.
Prime Minister parodies are a long-running feature of the British satirical magazine Private Eye, which have been included in the majority of issues since the magazine's inception.

Gerald Scarfe

ScarfeGerald Anthony Scarfe
Others essential to the development of the magazine were Auberon Waugh, Claud Cockburn (who had run a pre-war scandal sheet, The Week), Barry Fantoni, Gerald Scarfe, Tony Rushton, Patrick Marnham and Candida Betjeman.
After briefly working in advertising, a profession he grew to dislike intensely, Scarfe's early caricatures of public figures were published in satirical magazine Private Eye throughout the 1960s and 1970s.

Nigel Dempster

Nigel Richard Patton DempsterDempster, Nigel
The gossip columnist Nigel Dempster wrote extensively for the magazine before he fell out with Ian Hislop and other writers, while Foot wrote on politics, local government and corruption.
Best known for his celebrity gossip columns in newspapers, his work appeared in the Daily Express and Daily Mail and also in Private Eye magazine.

Dear Bill

Anyone for DenisAnyone for Denis?
While generally satirical, during the 1980s, Ingrams and John Wells wrote an affectionate series of fictional letters from Denis Thatcher to Bill Deedes in the Dear Bill column, mocking Thatcher as an amiable, golf-playing drunk.
The "Dear Bill" letters were a regular feature in the British satirical magazine Private Eye, purporting to be the private correspondence of Denis Thatcher, husband of the then-Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher.

The Establishment (club)

The EstablishmentEstablishment ClubThe Establishment Club
After the magazine's initial success, more funding was provided by Nicholas Luard and Peter Cook, who ran The Establishment – a satirical nightclub – and Private Eye became a fully professional publication.
It was founded by Peter Cook and Nicholas Luard, both of whom were also important in the history of the magazine Private Eye.

List of regular mini-sections in Private Eye

Pseuds CornerLuvviesNewspaper misprints
There are also several recurring miniature sections.
The following is a list of regularly appearing mini-sections appearing in the British satirical magazine Private Eye.

John Wells (satirist)

John WellsJohn Campbell WellsWells
While generally satirical, during the 1980s, Ingrams and John Wells wrote an affectionate series of fictional letters from Denis Thatcher to Bill Deedes in the Dear Bill column, mocking Thatcher as an amiable, golf-playing drunk. After National Service, Ingrams and Foot went as undergraduates to Oxford University, where they met future collaborators including Peter Usborne, Andrew Osmond and John Wells.
Wells was one of the original contributors to the satirical magazine Private Eye and contributed to Mrs Wilson's Diary, the long-running spoof journal of the wife of Prime Minister Harold Wilson.

Paul Foot Award

Paul Foot
In 2005, The Guardian and Private Eye established the Paul Foot Award (referred to colloquially as the "Footy"), with an annual £10,000 prize fund, for investigative/campaigning journalism in memory of Foot.
The Paul Foot Award is an award given for investigative or campaigning journalism, set up by The Guardian and Private Eye in memory of the journalist Paul Foot, who died in 2004.

Shrewsbury School

ShrewsburyShrewsbury Free Schoolfree school of Shrewsbury
The forerunner of Private Eye was The Salopian, a school magazine published at Shrewsbury School in the mid-1950s and edited by Richard Ingrams, Willie Rushton, Christopher Booker and Paul Foot.

The Week (1933)

The WeekThe Week'' (1933)
Others essential to the development of the magazine were Auberon Waugh, Claud Cockburn (who had run a pre-war scandal sheet, The Week), Barry Fantoni, Gerald Scarfe, Tony Rushton, Patrick Marnham and Candida Betjeman.
It focused on the rise of fascism, in a style that anticipated Private Eye and won a wide readership, according to Cockburn's son.

Recurring themes and in-jokes in Private Eye

Recurring in-jokes in ''Private EyeSir Bufton TuftonFundamentally Supine Authority
Private Eye is Britain's best-selling current affairs magazine, and such is its long-term popularity and impact that many of its recurring in-jokes have entered popular culture.
The fortnightly British satirical magazine Private Eye has long had a reputation for using euphemistic and irreverent substitute names and titles for people, groups and organisations and has coined a number of expressions to describe sex, drugs, alcohol and other aspects of human activity.

Current affairs (news format)

current affairscurrent-affairsCurrent Affairs Program
Private Eye is a British fortnightly satirical and current affairs news magazine, founded in 1961.
Additionally, newspapers such as the Private Eye, the Economist, Monocle, the Spectator, the Week, the Oldie, the Investors Chronicle, Prospect, MoneyWeek, the New Statesman, TIME, Fortune, the BBC History Magazine and History Today are all sometimes referred to as current affairs magazines.

The Guardian

GuardianManchester GuardianThe Manchester Guardian
The magazine often deliberately misspells the names of certain organisations, such as "Crapita" for the outsourcing company Capita, "Carter-Fuck" for the law firm Carter-Ruck, and "The Grauniad" for The Guardian (the latter a reference to the newspaper's typos in its days as The Manchester Guardian).
Frequent typographical errors in the paper led Private Eye magazine to dub it the "" in the 1960s, a nickname still used today.

Christopher Logue

Christopher Logue, CBELogueLogue, Christopher
Christopher Logue was another long-time contributor, providing the column "True Stories", featuring cuttings from the national press.
He was a long-term contributor to Private Eye magazine, as well as writing for Alexander Trocchi's literary journal, Merlin.

Candida Lycett Green

Candida Lycett-GreenCandidaCandida Betjeman
Others essential to the development of the magazine were Auberon Waugh, Claud Cockburn (who had run a pre-war scandal sheet, The Week), Barry Fantoni, Gerald Scarfe, Tony Rushton, Patrick Marnham and Candida Betjeman.
She was part of the original team who started Private Eye.