Procedures of the Supreme Court of the United States

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The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest court in the federal judiciary of the United States.wikipedia
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Supreme Court of the United States

United States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme CourtSupreme Court
The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest court in the federal judiciary of the United States.
It has ultimate (and largely discretionary) appellate jurisdiction over all federal and state court cases that involve a point of federal law, and original jurisdiction over a narrow range of cases, specifically "all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, and those in which a State shall be Party".

Chief Justice of the United States

Chief JusticeChief Justice of the United States Supreme CourtChief Justice of the Supreme Court
Since 1869, the Court has consisted of one chief justice and eight associate justices.
The chief justice has significant influence in the selection of cases for review, presides when oral arguments are held, and leads the discussion of cases among the justices.

Federal judiciary of the United States

federal courtfederal courtsUnited States federal court
The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest court in the federal judiciary of the United States.
It generally hears appeals from the courts of appeals and sometimes state courts, operating under discretionary review, which means that the Supreme Court can choose which cases to hear, by granting writs of certiorari.

Northern Mariana Islands Supreme Court

Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana IslandsSupreme CourtSupreme Court of the Northern Mariana Islands
As of May 1, 2004, CNMI Supreme Court appeals can be taken directly to the United States Supreme Court, thus giving the CNMI court relative parity with the highest courts of the 50 U.S. states.

Certiorari

certwrit of certioraricert.
If the Court grants the petition, the case is scheduled for the filing of briefs and for oral argument.

Solicitor General of the United States

Solicitor GeneralUnited States Solicitor GeneralU.S. Solicitor General
A justice may also decide that a case be "re-listed" for discussion at a later conference; this occurs, for example, where the Court decides to request input from the Solicitor General of the United States on whether a petition should be granted.
Other than the justices themselves, the Solicitor General is among the most influential and knowledgeable members of the legal community with regard to Supreme Court litigation.

Supreme court

court of last resorthighest courtsupreme
The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest court in the federal judiciary of the United States.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest court in the federal judiciary of the United States.

Law of the United States

United States federal lawUnited States lawAmerican lawyer
The procedures of the Supreme Court of the United States are governed by the U.S. Constitution, various federal statutes, and the Court's own internal rules. It also has ultimate appellate jurisdiction over all federal court and state court cases that involve a point of constitutional or statutory law.

Judiciary Act of 1869

9Circuit Judges Act of 18691869
Since 1869, the Court has consisted of one chief justice and eight associate justices.

Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States

Associate JusticeJusticeAssociate Justice of the Supreme Court
Since 1869, the Court has consisted of one chief justice and eight associate justices.

Appointments Clause

Article II, Section 2, Clause 2Presidential appointeenominated
Justices are nominated by the president, and with the advice and consent (confirmation) of the U.S. Senate, appointed to the Court by the president.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
Justices are nominated by the president, and with the advice and consent (confirmation) of the U.S. Senate, appointed to the Court by the president.

Advice and consent

confirmedSenate confirmationconfirmation
Justices are nominated by the president, and with the advice and consent (confirmation) of the U.S. Senate, appointed to the Court by the president.

United States Senate

U.S. SenatorUnited States SenatorU.S. Senate
Justices are nominated by the president, and with the advice and consent (confirmation) of the U.S. Senate, appointed to the Court by the president.

Life tenure

lifetime tenurefor lifeappointed for life
Once appointed, justices have lifetime tenure unless they resign, retire, or are removed from office.

Article Three of the United States Constitution

Article IIIU.S. Const. art. IIIArticle III of the United States Constitution
Established pursuant to Article III, Section 1 of the Constitution in 1789, it has original jurisdiction over a small range of cases, such as suits between two or more states, and those involving ambassadors.

Original jurisdiction

originalcourt of first instanceoriginal action
Established pursuant to Article III, Section 1 of the Constitution in 1789, it has original jurisdiction over a small range of cases, such as suits between two or more states, and those involving ambassadors.

U.S. state

StatestatesU. S. state
Established pursuant to Article III, Section 1 of the Constitution in 1789, it has original jurisdiction over a small range of cases, such as suits between two or more states, and those involving ambassadors.

Appellate jurisdiction

appellateappellate civil and criminal jurisdictionAppellate side
It also has ultimate appellate jurisdiction over all federal court and state court cases that involve a point of constitutional or statutory law.

State court (United States)

state courtstate courtsstate
It also has ultimate appellate jurisdiction over all federal court and state court cases that involve a point of constitutional or statutory law.

Judicial review

judicial oversightreviewjudicially reviewed
Moreover, the Court has the power of judicial review, the ability to invalidate a statute for violating a provision of the Constitution or an executive act for being unlawful.

Executive order

executive ordersExecutive order (United States)Presidential Executive Order
Moreover, the Court has the power of judicial review, the ability to invalidate a statute for violating a provision of the Constitution or an executive act for being unlawful.

Justiciability

justiciablenonjusticiablenon-justiciable
The Court may decide cases having political overtones, but does not have power to decide nonjusticiable political questions.