Proclamation of Neutrality

Neutrality Proclamationa proclamationdeclared neutrality in the conflictneutralneutrality
The Proclamation of Neutrality was a formal announcement issued by U.S.wikipedia
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George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
The Proclamation of Neutrality was a formal announcement issued by U.S. President George Washington on April 22, 1793 that declared the nation neutral in the conflict between France and Great Britain.
On April 22, 1793, during the French Revolution, Washington issued his famous Neutrality Proclamation and was resolved to pursue, "a conduct friendly and impartial toward the belligerent Powers" while he warned Americans not to intervene in the international conflict.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
The Proclamation of Neutrality was a formal announcement issued by U.S. President George Washington on April 22, 1793 that declared the nation neutral in the conflict between France and Great Britain.

Neutral country

neutralityneutralarmed neutrality
The Proclamation of Neutrality was a formal announcement issued by U.S. President George Washington on April 22, 1793 that declared the nation neutral in the conflict between France and Great Britain.

French Revolutionary Wars

French RevolutionaryFrench Revolutionary WarFrench Revolutionary troops
The Proclamation of Neutrality was a formal announcement issued by U.S. President George Washington on April 22, 1793 that declared the nation neutral in the conflict between France and Great Britain.

French Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionary FranceRevolutionary
News that Revolutionary France had declared war on Great Britain in February 1793, and with this declaration that France, by the country's own volition, was now at war with all of Europe, did not reach America until the first half of April of that year.

Mount Vernon

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President Washington was at Mount Vernon attending the funeral of a nephew when he was given the news.

Thomas Jefferson

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Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson, in particular, saw in this question, the influence of the Federalists — his political rivals; yet he too agreed a proclamation was in order, though perhaps not an official one.

Sine qua non

condicio sine qua nonbut-forcondiciones sine quibus non
In a cabinet meeting of January 14th, Thomas Jefferson argued that while neutrality was a sine qua non, there was no real need to make a Proclamation of Neutrality either immediately or even officially; perhaps there might be no need for an official declaration at all.

Alexander Hamilton

HamiltonHamiltonianA. Hamilton
In response, Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton declared that American neutrality was not negotiable.

James Madison

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Jefferson (having read several of the "Pacificus" essays) encouraged James Madison to reply.

Presidency of George Washington

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In foreign affairs, he assured domestic tranquility and maintained peace with the European powers despite the raging French Revolutionary Wars by issuing the 1793 Proclamation of Neutrality.

History of U.S. foreign policy, 1776–1801

President Washington sought to avoid foreign entanglement, issuing the Proclamation of Neutrality in 1793.

Federalist Party

FederalistFederalistsF
No similar parties existed anywhere in the world.

Treaty of Alliance (1778)

Treaty of Alliance1778 Treaty of Alliancealliance
The Franco-American alliance would technically remain in effect until the 1800 Treaty of Mortefontaine, despite being annulled by the United States Congress in 1793 when George Washington gave his Neutrality Proclamation speech saying that America would stay neutral in the French Revolution.

France–United States relations

Franco-American relationsFrance – United States relationsFrance
President George Washington (responding to advice from both Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson) recognized the French government, but did not support France in the war with Britain, as expressed in his 1793 Proclamation of Neutrality.

Hamilton (musical)

HamiltonHamilton: An American MusicalHam4Ham
President Washington ultimately agrees with Hamilton's argument for remaining neutral ("Cabinet Battle #2").

Presidential proclamation (United States)

presidential proclamationproclamationpresidential proclamations
George Washington's Proclamation of Neutrality in 1793 and Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 are some of America's most famous presidential proclamations in this regard.

French Revolutionary Legion

Clark and Shelby continued their preparations, however, so President Washington issued a Proclamation of Neutrality on March 24 which forbid Americans from invading Spain.

Edmond-Charles Genêt

Citizen GenetEdmond-Charles GenetCitizen Genêt
His actions endangered American neutrality in the war between France and Britain, which Washington had pointedly declared in his Neutrality Proclamation of April 22.

George Washington's Farewell Address

Farewell AddressWashington's Farewell Address1796 ''Farewell Address
Washington had avoided American involvement in the conflict by issuing the Proclamation of Neutrality, which in turn led to the Neutrality Act of 1794.

Neutrality Act of 1794

Neutrality ActNeutrality Actsforfeit his United States citizenship
This led to George Washington's Proclamation of Neutrality in 1793 and the act of 1794.

Henry Knox

General KnoxKnoxGeneral Henry Knox
When the French Revolutionary Wars broke out in 1793, American merchant shipping began to be affected after Washington formally declared neutrality in the conflict.