Profession

professionsoccupationprofessedoccupationsprofessional practice professional classfacultiefree professionjoblearned profession
A profession is an occupation founded upon specialized educational training, the purpose of which is to supply disinterested objective counsel and service to others, for a direct and definite compensation, wholly apart from expectation of other business gain.wikipedia
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Training

traineestrainedtrainee
A profession is an occupation founded upon specialized educational training, the purpose of which is to supply disinterested objective counsel and service to others, for a direct and definite compensation, wholly apart from expectation of other business gain.
In addition to the basic training required for a trade, occupation or profession, observers of the labor-market recognize the need to continue training beyond initial qualifications: to maintain, upgrade and update skills throughout working life.

Accounting

accountancyaccountantAccounts
Applying these milestones to the historical sequence of development in the United States shows surveying achieving professional status first (note that George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Abraham Lincoln all worked as land surveyors before entering politics), followed by medicine, actuarial science, law, dentistry, civil engineering, logistics, architecture and accounting.
Accountancy refers to the occupation or profession of an accountant, particularly in British English.

Licensure

licensedprofessional licensinglicensing
6) the establishment of state licensing laws All professions involve technical, specialized and highly skilled work often referred to as "professional expertise." Training for this work involves obtaining degrees and professional qualifications (see Licensure) without which entry to the profession is barred (occupational closure).
In the United States and Canada, licensing (the term registration is sometimes used) is usually required by law to work in a particular profession or to obtain a privilege such as to drive a car or truck.

Dentistry

dentaldental caredentist
Applying these milestones to the historical sequence of development in the United States shows surveying achieving professional status first (note that George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Abraham Lincoln all worked as land surveyors before entering politics), followed by medicine, actuarial science, law, dentistry, civil engineering, logistics, architecture and accounting.

Engineering

engineerengineersengineered
The engineering profession is highly regulated in some countries (Canada and USA) with a strict licensing system for Professional Engineer that controls the practice but not in others (UK) where titles and qualifications are regulated Chartered Engineer but practice is not regulated.
With the rise of engineering as a profession in the 18th century, the term became more narrowly applied to fields in which mathematics and science were applied to these ends.

Expert

expertiseexpertsspecialist
All professions involve technical, specialized and highly skilled work often referred to as "professional expertise." Training for this work involves obtaining degrees and professional qualifications (see Licensure) without which entry to the profession is barred (occupational closure).
An expert can be believed, by virtue of credential, training, education, profession, publication or experience, to have special knowledge of a subject beyond that of the average person, sufficient that others may officially (and legally) rely upon the individual's opinion.

Social status

statussuccesssocial ladder
Professions enjoy a high social status, regard and esteem conferred upon them by society.
In the school playground, occupation is usually thought of as the main determinant of status, but other memberships or affiliations (such as ethnic group, religion, gender, voluntary associations, fandom, hobby) can have an influence.

Professional degree

first professional degreeprofessionaldegree
First professional degree
A professional degree, formerly known in the US as a first professional degree, is a degree that prepares someone to work in a particular profession, often meeting the academic requirements for licensure or accreditation.

Professional

professionalismprofessionalspro
Professional
A professional is a member of a profession or any person who earns their living from a specified professional activity.

District attorney

assistant district attorneyD.A.DA
Although professions may enjoy relatively high status and public prestige, not all professionals earn high salaries, and even within specific professions there exist significant inequalities of compensation; in law, for example, a corporate/insurance defense lawyer working on a billable-hour basis may earn several times what a prosecutor or public defender earns.

Education

teachingeducationaleducationist
A profession is an occupation founded upon specialized educational training, the purpose of which is to supply disinterested objective counsel and service to others, for a direct and definite compensation, wholly apart from expectation of other business gain.
The purpose of secondary education can be to give common knowledge, to prepare for higher education, or to train directly in a profession.

Professional association

professional organizationprofessional bodyprofessional society
Professional body
A professional association (also called a professional body, professional organization, or professional society) seeks to further a particular profession, the interests of individuals engaged in that profession and the public interest.

Semiprofession

Semiprofession
A semiprofession is an occupation that requires advanced knowledge and skills but is not widely regarded as a true profession.

Professionalization

professionalisationprofessionalizeprofessionalized
Professionalization
Professionalization is a social process by which any trade or occupation transforms itself into a true "profession of the highest integrity and competence."

Job control (workplace)

job controlwork autonomyworkplace autonomy
They have a "professional association, cognitive base, institutionalized training, licensing, work autonomy, colleague control... (and) code of ethics", to which Larson then also adds, "high standards of professional and intellectual excellence," (Larson, p. 221) that "professions are occupations with special power and prestige", (Larson, p.x) and that they comprise "an exclusive elite group," (Larson, p. 20) in all societies.
Profession#Status and prestige

Professional boundaries

demonstrating clear boundariesprofessional personal boundaries
Professional boundaries
Profession

Occupational closure

All professions involve technical, specialized and highly skilled work often referred to as "professional expertise." Training for this work involves obtaining degrees and professional qualifications (see Licensure) without which entry to the profession is barred (occupational closure).
Profession

Professional corporation

P.C.PCProfessional corporations
Instead, if they wish to practice collectively they must form special business entities such as partnerships or professional corporations, which feature (1) reduced protection against liability for professional negligence and (2) severe limitations or outright prohibitions on ownership by non-professionals.
* Profession#Autonomy

Professional development

continuing professional developmentprofessional trainingCPD
Professional development
Most professions have CPD obligations.

Oslo and Akershus University College

Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied SciencesUniversity College of Akershus
Centre for the Study of Professions
Centre for the Study of Professions (CSP, Senter for profesjonsstudier) was formally opened in 1999 in order to stimulate research and critical reflection within the study of professions.

European Union

EUEuropeanEurope
Originally borrowed by English users in the 19th century, it has been re-borrowed by international users from the late 20th, though the (upper-middle) class overtones of the term do not seem to survive retranslation: "liberal professions" are, according to the European Union's Directive on Recognition of Professional Qualifications (2005/36/EC) "those practiced on the basis of relevant professional qualifications in a personal, responsible and professionally independent capacity by those providing intellectual and conceptual services in the interest of the client and the public".

Divinity (academic discipline)

divinitydivineProfessor of Divinity
Medieval and early modern tradition recognized only three professions: divinity, medicine, and law – the so-called "learned professions".

Medicine

medicalmedical sciencemedicinal
Medieval and early modern tradition recognized only three professions: divinity, medicine, and law – the so-called "learned professions".

Law

legallawslegal theory
Medieval and early modern tradition recognized only three professions: divinity, medicine, and law – the so-called "learned professions".

Surveying

surveyorsurveysurveyed
Applying these milestones to the historical sequence of development in the United States shows surveying achieving professional status first (note that George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Abraham Lincoln all worked as land surveyors before entering politics), followed by medicine, actuarial science, law, dentistry, civil engineering, logistics, architecture and accounting.