Prognosis

prognosticprognosesprognosticationprognosticationssurvival timeoutcomeprognostic factorprognostic indicatordisease outcomemedical outcome
Prognosis (Greek: πρόγνωσις "fore-knowing, foreseeing") is a medical term for predicting the likely or expected development of a disease, including whether the signs and symptoms will improve or worsen (and how quickly) or remain stable over time; expectations of quality of life, such as the ability to carry out daily activities; the potential for complications and associated health issues; and the likelihood of survival (including life expectancy).wikipedia
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Medicine

medicalmedical scienceclinical medicine
Prognosis (Greek: πρόγνωσις "fore-knowing, foreseeing") is a medical term for predicting the likely or expected development of a disease, including whether the signs and symptoms will improve or worsen (and how quickly) or remain stable over time; expectations of quality of life, such as the ability to carry out daily activities; the potential for complications and associated health issues; and the likelihood of survival (including life expectancy).
Medicine is the science and practice of establishing the diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.

Medical sign

signsclinical signsign
Prognosis (Greek: πρόγνωσις "fore-knowing, foreseeing") is a medical term for predicting the likely or expected development of a disease, including whether the signs and symptoms will improve or worsen (and how quickly) or remain stable over time; expectations of quality of life, such as the ability to carry out daily activities; the potential for complications and associated health issues; and the likelihood of survival (including life expectancy).
* Prognostic signs (from progignṓskein, προγιγνώσκειν, "to know beforehand"): signs that indicate the future outcome of the current bodily state of the patient, rather than indicating the name of the disease.

Manchester score

A Manchester score is an indicator of prognosis for small-cell lung cancer.
Manchester score is an indicator of prognosis in small cell lung cancer.

International Prognostic Index

Follicular Lymphoma International Prognostic Index (FLIPI)
For Non-Hodgkin lymphoma, physicians have developed the International Prognostic Index to predict patient outcome.
The International Prognostic Index (IPI) is a clinical tool developed by oncologists to aid in predicting the prognosis of patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Lung cancer

lungbronchogenic carcinomalungs
A Manchester score is an indicator of prognosis for small-cell lung cancer.
It is one of the factors affecting both the prognosis and the potential treatment of lung cancer.

Survival rate

overall survivaldisease-free survivalsurvival
Survival rates are important for prognosis, but because the rate is based on the population as a whole, an individual prognosis may be different depending on newer treatments since the last statistical analysis as well as the overall general health of the patient.

Hippocrates

HippocraticHippocrates of CosHippocrates of Kos
One of the earliest written works of medicine is the Book of Prognostics of Hippocrates, written around 400 BC.
Its focus was on patient care and prognosis, not diagnosis.

Multiple myeloma

myelomabone-marrow cancerbone marrow cancer
Other medical areas where prognostic indicators are used is in Drug-Induced Liver Injury (DILI) (Hy's law) and use of an exercise stress test as a prognostic indicator after myocardial infarction, also use to indicator multiple myeloma survive rate.
Cytogenetic analysis of myeloma cells may be of prognostic value, with deletion of chromosome 13, nonhyperdiploidy, and the balanced translocations t(4;14) and t(14;16) conferring a poorer prognosis.

Medical diagnosis

diagnosisdiagnosticdiagnostic criteria
For 19th century physicians, particularly those following the French school of medicine, the main aim of medicine was not to cure disease, but rather to give a medical diagnosis and achieve a satisfying prognosis of the patient's chances.
From this point on, in addition to treating the patient's condition, the provider can educate the patient about the etiology, progression, prognosis, other outcomes, and possible treatments of her or his ailments, as well as providing advice for maintaining health.

Nocebo

nocebo effectThe Nocebo Effect
Writing from his extensive experience of treating cancer (including more than 1,000 melanoma cases) at Sydney Hospital, Milton (1973) warned of the impact of the delivery of a prognosis, and how many of his patients, upon receiving their prognosis, simply turned their face to the wall and died a premature death: "there is a small group of patients in whom the realization of impending death is a blow so terrible that they are quite unable to adjust to it, and they die rapidly before the malignancy seems to have developed enough to cause death. This problem of self-willed death is in some ways analogous to the death produced in primitive peoples by witchcraft ('pointing the bone')".

Ancient Greek

GreekClassical GreekGr.
Prognosis (Greek: πρόγνωσις "fore-knowing, foreseeing") is a medical term for predicting the likely or expected development of a disease, including whether the signs and symptoms will improve or worsen (and how quickly) or remain stable over time; expectations of quality of life, such as the ability to carry out daily activities; the potential for complications and associated health issues; and the likelihood of survival (including life expectancy).

Symptom

symptomsnon-specific symptomssymptomatic
Prognosis (Greek: πρόγνωσις "fore-knowing, foreseeing") is a medical term for predicting the likely or expected development of a disease, including whether the signs and symptoms will improve or worsen (and how quickly) or remain stable over time; expectations of quality of life, such as the ability to carry out daily activities; the potential for complications and associated health issues; and the likelihood of survival (including life expectancy).

Statistical population

populationsubpopulationsubpopulations
When applied to large statistical populations, prognostic estimates can be very accurate: for example the statement "45% of patients with severe septic shock will die within 28 days" can be made with some confidence, because previous research found that this proportion of patients died.

Septic shock

septicshockshock, septic
When applied to large statistical populations, prognostic estimates can be very accurate: for example the statement "45% of patients with severe septic shock will die within 28 days" can be made with some confidence, because previous research found that this proportion of patients died.

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

non-Hodgkin's lymphomanon-Hodgkin’s lymphomanon-Hodgkin
For Non-Hodgkin lymphoma, physicians have developed the International Prognostic Index to predict patient outcome.

Hy's law

Other medical areas where prognostic indicators are used is in Drug-Induced Liver Injury (DILI) (Hy's law) and use of an exercise stress test as a prognostic indicator after myocardial infarction, also use to indicator multiple myeloma survive rate.

Cardiac stress test

exercise stress teststress testcardiac stress tests
Other medical areas where prognostic indicators are used is in Drug-Induced Liver Injury (DILI) (Hy's law) and use of an exercise stress test as a prognostic indicator after myocardial infarction, also use to indicator multiple myeloma survive rate.

Myocardial infarction

heart attackheart attacksacute myocardial infarction
Other medical areas where prognostic indicators are used is in Drug-Induced Liver Injury (DILI) (Hy's law) and use of an exercise stress test as a prognostic indicator after myocardial infarction, also use to indicator multiple myeloma survive rate.

Intensive care unit

ICUintensive-care unitintensive care
For patients who are critically ill, particularly those in an intensive care unit, there are numerical prognostic scoring systems that are more accurate.

APACHE II

Apache 2Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IIAPACHE
The most famous of these is the APACHE II scale, which is most accurate when applied in the seven days prior to a patient's predicted death.