Programme for International Student Assessment

PISAProgram for International Student AssessmentPISA studiesProgramme for International Student Assessment (PISA)PISA 2012Best student performance in mathematicsdifferences in the mean quality of the populationhighly educatedInternational PISA testOECD
The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) is a worldwide study by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in member and non-member nations intended to evaluate educational systems by measuring 15-year-old school pupils' scholastic performance on mathematics, science, and reading.wikipedia
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Literacy

literacy rategender disparityilliterate
PISA aims to test literacy the competence of students in three fields: reading, mathematics, science on an indefinite scale.
Data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) has consistently indicated the literacy underachievement of boys within member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

Iceland

IcelandicISLRepublic of Iceland
In small countries like Iceland and Luxembourg, where there are fewer than 5,000 students per year, an entire age cohort is tested.
Nevertheless, Iceland's education system is considered excellent: the Programme for International Student Assessment currently ranks it as the 16th best performing, above the OECD average.

Taiwan

Republic of ChinaFormosaRepublic of China (Taiwan)
China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, Singapore and Argentina were only some of the examples.
In 2015, Taiwanese students achieved one of the world's best results in mathematics, science and literacy, as tested by the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), with the average student scoring 519, compared with the OECD average of 493, placing it seventh in the world.

Slovenia

SloveneSlovenianRepublic of Slovenia
Slovenia's education ranks as the 12th best in the world and 4th best in the European Union, being significantly higher than the OECD average, according to the Programme for International Student Assessment.

Japan

JPNJapaneseJP
The Programme for International Student Assessment coordinated by the OECD currently ranks the overall knowledge and skills of Japanese 15-year-olds as the third best in the world.

Singapore

Republic of SingaporeSingapore CitySingaporean
China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, Singapore and Argentina were only some of the examples.
In 2016, Singapore students topped both the Program International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS).

Canada

CanadianCANCanadians
The Programme for International Student Assessment indicates Canadian students perform well above the OECD average, particularly in mathematics, science, and reading.

Belgium

BelgianBELKingdom of Belgium
The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), coordinated by the OECD, currently ranks Belgium's education as the 19th best in the world, being significantly higher than the OECD average.

Estonia

ESTRepublic of EstoniaEstonian
According to the Programme for International Student Assessment, the performance levels of gymnasium-age pupils in Estonia is among the highest in the world: in 2010, the country was ranked 13th for the quality of its education system, well above the OECD average.

China

People's Republic of ChinaChineseCHN
China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, Singapore and Argentina were only some of the examples.
In 2009, Chinese students from Shanghai achieved the world's best results in mathematics, science and literacy, as tested by the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), a worldwide evaluation of 15-year-old school pupils' scholastic performance.

Czech Republic

CzechCZEthe Czech Republic
The Programme for International Student Assessment, coordinated by the OECD, currently ranks the Czech education system as the 15th most successful in the world, higher than the OECD average.

Poland

PolishPOLRepublic of Poland
, Programme for International Student Assessment, coordinated by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, ranks Poland's educational system higher than the OECD average.

France

FrenchFRAFrench Republic
The Programme for International Student Assessment, coordinated by the OECD, ranked France's education as about the OECD average in 2015.

New Zealand

NZLNZKiwi
The OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment ranks New Zealand's education system as the seventh best in the world, with students performing exceptionally well in reading, mathematics and science.

Sweden

SwedishSWEKingdom of Sweden
In the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), Swedish 15-year-old pupils score close to the OECD average.

Australia

AUSAustralianCommonwealth of Australia
In the Programme for International Student Assessment, Australia regularly scores among the top five of thirty major developed countries (member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development).

Portugal

PortuguesePortuguese RepublicPOR
According to the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2015, the average Portuguese 15-year-old student, when rated in terms of reading literacy, mathematics and science knowledge, is placed significantly above the OECD's average, at a similar level as those students from Norway, Poland, Denmark and Belgium, with 501 points (493 is the average).

Slovakia

SlovakSVKSlovak Republic
The Programme for International Student Assessment, coordinated by the OECD, currently ranks Slovak secondary education the 30th in the world (placing it just below the United States and just above Spain).

Bulgaria

BULBulgarianRepublic of Bulgaria
The PISA study of 2015 found 41.5% of pupils in the 9th grade to be functionally illiterate in reading, maths and science.

Uruguay

UruguayanOriental Republic of UruguayRepublic of Uruguay
Uruguay ranks high on standardised tests such as PISA at a regional level, but compares unfavourably to the OECD average, and is also below some countries with similar levels of income.

Gender gaps in mathematics and reading

achievement gender gapgender gapgender gaps
The Programme for International Student Assessment assesses the performance of 15-year-olds in mathematics and reading in OECD and OECD partner countries.

Turkey

TurkishRepublic of TurkeyTUR
Turkey is ranked 32nd out of 34 in the OECD's PISA study.

Andreas Schleicher

Schleicher, Andreas
According to an open letter to Andreas Schleicher, director of PISA, various academics and educators argued that "OECD and Pisa tests are damaging education worldwide".
He is the Division Head and coordinator of the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the OECD Indicators of Education Systems programme (INES).

Eric Hanushek

Eric A. HanushekDr. Eric HanushekHanushek, Eric A.
Data from PISA have furnished several economists, notably Eric Hanushek, Ludger Wößmann, Heiner Rindermann, and Stephen J. Ceci, with material for books and articles about the relationship between student achievement and economic development, democratization, and health; as well as the roles of such single educational factors as high-stakes exams, the presence or absence of private schools and the effects and timing of ability tracking.
By his calculations, average U.S. PISA scores would increase to the level of Canada, or maybe even Finland, and that higher U.S. growth would lead to substantial economic gains.

Ludger Wößmann

Ludger WoessmannWoessmann
Data from PISA have furnished several economists, notably Eric Hanushek, Ludger Wößmann, Heiner Rindermann, and Stephen J. Ceci, with material for books and articles about the relationship between student achievement and economic development, democratization, and health; as well as the roles of such single educational factors as high-stakes exams, the presence or absence of private schools and the effects and timing of ability tracking.
In this context, Wößmann's analyses of students' performance using TIMSS and PISA data find central exams and control mechanisms, school autonomy in personnel and process decisions, individual teachers' influence over teaching methods, limits to teacher unions' influence on curriculum scope, scrutiny of students' achievements and competition from private schools to be related with higher student performance, findings for which Wößmann and John Bishop provide theoretical foundations.