Portrait by Pach Bros., c. 1904
The bull moose was the party's official mascot
Theodore Roosevelt at age 11
The 1912 Progressive National Convention at the Chicago Coliseum
The Roosevelt coat of arms as displayed on Theodore Roosevelt's bookplate, featuring three roses in a meadow (in reference to the family name, which means "rose field" in Dutch).
Theodore Roosevelt was the founder of the Progressive Party and thus is often associated with the party
6-year-old Theodore and 5-year-old Elliott watch Lincoln's funeral procession from the second-floor window of their grandfather's mansion (at top left, facing the camera), Manhattan, April 25, 1865
16-page campaign booklet with the platform of the new Progressive Party
Roosevelt's taxidermy kit
Roosevelt mixing ideologies in his speeches in this 1912 editorial cartoon by Karl K. Knecht (1883–1972) in the Evansville Courier
Roosevelt's birthplace at 28 East 20th Street in Manhattan, New York City
Roosevelt and Hiram Johnson after nomination
Roosevelt as New York State Assemblyman, 1883
Pro-Roosevelt cartoon contrasts the Republican Party bosses in back row and Progressive Party reformers in front
Theodore Roosevelt as Badlands hunter in 1885. New York studio photo.
NYC Police Commissioner Roosevelt walks the beat with journalist Jacob Riis in 1894—Illustration from Riis's autobiography.
The Asiatic Squadron destroying the Spanish fleet in the Battle of Manila Bay on May 1, 1898
Colonel Theodore Roosevelt
Colonel Roosevelt and the Rough Riders after capturing Kettle Hill in Cuba in July 1898, along with members of the 3rd Volunteers and the regular Army black 10th Cavalry
Bureau of Engraving and Printing engraved portrait of Roosevelt as President
Official White House portrait by John Singer Sargent
Roosevelt driving through a sequoia tree tunnel
The U.S.'s intentions to influence the area (especially the Panama Canal construction and control) led to the separation of Panama from Colombia in 1903
1903 cartoon: "Go Away, Little Man, and Don't Bother Me". Roosevelt intimidating Colombia to acquire the Panama Canal Zone.
1904 election results
Roosevelt family at Oyster Bay, circa 1903
Roosevelt shortly after leaving office, October 1910
Roosevelt standing next to the elephant he shot on safari
Punch depicts no-holds-barred fight between Taft and Roosevelt
Roosevelt campaigning for president, 1912
Theodore Roosevelt's medical x-ray on October 14, 1912, after the assassination attempt, showing the bullet that would remain inside his body for life
The bullet-damaged speech and eyeglass case on display at the Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace in Manhattan, New York City
From left to right (seated): Fr. John Augustine Zahm, Cândido Rondon, Kermit Roosevelt, Cherrie, Miller, four Brazilians, Roosevelt, Fiala. Only Roosevelt, Kermit, Cherrie, Rondon, and the Brazilians traveled down the River of Doubt.
Former President Theodore Roosevelt in Allentown, Pennsylvania, 1914
Theodore and Edith Roosevelt's Grave at Youngs Memorial Cemetery
Part of the Works of Theodore Roosevelt
Sagamore Hill, Roosevelt's Long Island estate
"The Man of the Hour" Roosevelt as Warrior in 1898 and Peacemaker in 1905 settling war between Russia and Japan
1910 cartoon showing Roosevelt's many roles from 1899 to 1910
Theodore Roosevelt and pilot Hoxsey at St. Louis, October 11, 1910.

The Progressive Party was a third party in the United States formed in 1912 by former president Theodore Roosevelt after he lost the presidential nomination of the Republican Party to his former protégé rival, incumbent president William Howard Taft.

- Progressive Party (United States, 1912)

He failed, walked out, and founded the Progressive Party.

- Theodore Roosevelt
Portrait by Pach Bros., c. 1904

17 related topics with Alpha

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1912 United States presidential election

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The 32nd quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 5, 1912.

The 32nd quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 5, 1912.

A Punch cartoon by Leonard Raven-Hill, depicting the perceived aggression between Taft and Roosevelt.
Progressive convention, 1912
Eugene V. Debs's popular vote results were the highest for the Socialist party.
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Results by state
Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote
Results by county, shaded according to percentage of the vote for Wilson
Results by county, shaded according to percentage of the vote for Taft
Results by county, shaded according to percentage of the vote for Debs
Results by county, shaded according to percentage of the vote for all others including Debs
A continuous cartogram of the 1912 United States presidential election
Cartogram shaded according to percentage of the vote for Wilson
Cartogram shaded according to percentage of the vote for Taft
Cartogram shaded according to percentage of the vote for all others

Democratic Governor Woodrow Wilson unseated incumbent Republican President William Howard Taft and defeated former President Theodore Roosevelt, who ran under the banner of the new Progressive or "Bull Moose" Party.

Taft in 1909

William Howard Taft

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The 27th president of the United States (1909–1913) and the tenth chief justice of the United States (1921–1930), the only person to have held both offices.

The 27th president of the United States (1909–1913) and the tenth chief justice of the United States (1921–1930), the only person to have held both offices.

Taft in 1909
Yale College photograph of Taft
Sultan Jamalul Kiram II with William Howard Taft of the Philippine Commission in Jolo, Sulu (March 27, 1901)
Roosevelt introduces Taft as his crown prince: Puck magazine cover cartoon, 1906.
One of a series of candid photographs known as the Evolution of a Smile, taken just after a formal portrait session, as Taft learns by telephone from Roosevelt of his nomination for president.
1908 Taft/Sherman poster
1908 electoral vote results
1909 inauguration
Newton McConnell cartoon showing Canadian suspicions that Taft and others were only interested in Canada when prosperous.
Taft and Porfirio Díaz, Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, 1909
Official White House portrait of Taft by Anders Zorn, c. 1911
Taft promoted Associate Justice Edward Douglass White to be Chief Justice of the United States.
1909 Puck magazine cover: Roosevelt departs, entrusting his policies to Taft
Taft with Archibald Butt (second from right)
Taft and Roosevelt – political enemies in 1912
Campaign advertisement arguing Taft deserved a second term
Electoral vote by state, 1912. States won by Taft are in red.
Taft (left) with President Warren G. Harding and Robert Lincoln at the dedication of the Lincoln Memorial, May 30, 1922
Chief Justice Taft, c. 1921
The U.S. Supreme Court in 1925. Taft is seated in the bottom row, middle.
Time cover, June 30, 1924
Taft insisted that Charles Evans Hughes succeed him as chief justice.
Taft's headstone at Arlington National Cemetery
Four-cent stamp issued for Taft (1930)

Taft was elected president in 1908, the chosen successor of Theodore Roosevelt, but was defeated for reelection in 1912 by Woodrow Wilson after Roosevelt split the Republican vote by running as a third-party candidate.

Portrait by Harris & Ewing, 1919

Woodrow Wilson

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American politician and academic who served as the 28th president of the United States from 1913 to 1921.

American politician and academic who served as the 28th president of the United States from 1913 to 1921.

Portrait by Harris & Ewing, 1919
Wilson, c. undefined mid-1870s
Ellen Wilson in 1912
Wilson in 1902
Prospect House, Wilson's home on Princeton's campus
Governor Wilson, 1911
Results of the 1910 gubernatorial election in New Jersey. Wilson won the counties in blue.
1912 electoral vote map
Woodrow Wilson and his cabinet (1918)
Wilson giving his first State of the Union address, the first such address since 1801
Map of Federal Reserve Districts–black circles, Federal Reserve Banks–black squares, District branches–red circles and Washington HQ–star/black circle
In a 1913 cartoon, Wilson primes the economic pump with tariff, currency and antitrust laws
Official presidential portrait of Woodrow Wilson (1913)
Uncle Sam entering Mexico in 1916 to punish Pancho Villa. Uncle Sam says "I've had about enough of this."
Wilson and "Jingo", the American War Dog. The editorial cartoon ridicules jingoes baying for war.
The Wilson family
Wilson accepts the Democratic Party nomination, 1916
1916 electoral vote map
Map of the great powers and their empires in 1914
Liberty Loan drive in front of City Hall, New Orleans. On City Hall is a banner reading "Food will win the war—don't waste it".
Women workers in ordnance shops, Pennsylvania, 1918
The "Big Four" at the Paris Peace Conference in 1919, following the end of World War I. Wilson is standing next to Georges Clemenceau at right.
Several new European states were established at the Paris Peace Conference
Wilson returning from the Versailles Peace Conference, 1919.
June 3, 1919, Newspapers of the 1919 bombings
Republican nominee Warren G. Harding defeated Democratic nominee James Cox in the 1920 election
The final resting place of Woodrow Wilson at the Washington National Cathedral
Quotation from Woodrow Wilson's History of the American People as reproduced in the film The Birth of a Nation.
World War I draft card, the lower left corner to be removed by men of African background to help keep the military segregated
Political cartoon published in New York Evening Mail about the East St. Louis riots of 1917. Original caption reads "Mr. President, why not make America safe for democracy?"
1934 $100,000 gold certificate depicting Wilson.
Stamps memorializing Wilson
Woodrow Wilson Monument in Prague

Wilson defeated incumbent Republican William Howard Taft and third-party nominee Theodore Roosevelt to easily win the 1912 United States presidential election, becoming the first Southerner to do so since 1848.

In the 1912 general election, Wilson faced two major opponents: one-term Republican incumbent William Howard Taft, and former Republican President Theodore Roosevelt, who ran a third party campaign as the "Bull Moose" Party nominee.

Robert M. La Follette

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American lawyer and politician.

American lawyer and politician.

Robert M. La Follette's college yearbook photo, 1879
Portrait from History of the Bench and Bar of Wisconsin, vol. 2, 1898
La Follette addressing a large Chautauqua assembly in Decatur, Illinois, 1905
La Follette in 1908
La Follette in 1912
Time cover, December 3, 1923
La Follette recording a radio speech in 1924, shortly before his death
1924 presidential election results by county. Counties won by La Follette are marked green.
La Follette with his wife and daughter in February 1924

He challenged Taft for the Republican presidential nomination in the 1912 presidential election, but his candidacy was overshadowed by that of former President Theodore Roosevelt.

Roosevelt's supporters bolted the Republican Party, established the Progressive Party, and nominated Roosevelt on a third party ticket, but La Follette continued to attack Roosevelt as a traitor to the progressive cause.

Nominees Taft and Sherman

1912 Republican National Convention

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Held at the Chicago Coliseum, Chicago, Illinois, from June 18 to June 22, 1912.

Held at the Chicago Coliseum, Chicago, Illinois, from June 18 to June 22, 1912.

Nominees Taft and Sherman
The 1912 Republican National Convention in session
Crowd outside the convention hall

The ticket went on to place 3rd in the November election behind former president Theodore Roosevelt, who ran under the banner of the new Progressive or "Bull Moose" Party, and Democratic Governor Woodrow Wilson.

Women marching for the right to vote, 1912

Progressivism in the United States

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Political philosophy and reform movement that reached its height early in the 20th century.

Political philosophy and reform movement that reached its height early in the 20th century.

Women marching for the right to vote, 1912
"The Bosses of the Senate", a cartoon by Joseph Keppler depicting corporate interests–from steel, copper, oil, iron, sugar, tin, and coal to paper bags, envelopes and salt–as giant money bags looming over the tiny senators at their desks in the Chamber of the United States Senate
A poster highlighting the situation of child labor in the United States in the early 20th century
Upton Sinclair's The Jungle exposed Americans to the horrors of the Chicago meatpacking plants.
Senator Bernie Sanders, an advocate of single-payer healthcare
Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez from New York, an advocate of action on climate change and author of the Green New Deal

Presidents such as Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft supported trust-busting.

In the early 20th century, politicians of the Democratic and Republican parties, Lincoln–Roosevelt League Republicans (in California) and Theodore Roosevelt's Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party all pursued environmental, political and economic reforms.

Hughes in 1931

Charles Evans Hughes

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American statesman, politician and jurist who served as the 11th Chief Justice of the United States from 1930 to 1941.

American statesman, politician and jurist who served as the 11th Chief Justice of the United States from 1930 to 1941.

Hughes in 1931
Hughes at the age of 16
Hughes with his wife and children, c. 1916
Gubernatorial portrait of Charles Evans Hughes
Hughes struck up a close friendship with Associate Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.
Hughes in Winona, Minnesota, during the 1916 presidential campaign campaigning on the Olympian
1916 electoral vote results
Hughes's residence in 1921
Hughes (fourth from right) leads a delegation to Brazil with Carl Theodore Vogelgesang in 1922
Time cover, December 29, 1924
Mrs. Antoinette Carter, (Mr. Hughes's Wife)
Portrait of Hughes as Chief Justice
The Hughes Court in 1937, photographed by Erich Salomon
Associate Justice William O. Douglas served alongside Hughes on the Supreme Court
Hughes's gravesite

Seeking a strong candidate to defeat newspaper mogul William Randolph Hearst in the 1906 New York gubernatorial election, President Theodore Roosevelt convinced New York Republican leaders to nominate Hughes for governor.

Taft won re-nomination, but Roosevelt ran on the ticket of a third party, the Progressive Party.

Gifford Pinchot portrait by Pirie MacDonald, 1909

Gifford Pinchot

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American forester and politician.

American forester and politician.

Gifford Pinchot portrait by Pirie MacDonald, 1909
Portrait of Gifford Pinchot by Benjamin Johnston, c. 1901
Theodore Roosevelt and Gifford Pinchot on the steamer Mississippi, 1907
Pinchot visiting summer campers attending the School of Forestry camp at Grey Towers (Pinchot is with the dog), 1910
Time cover, November 23, 1925
Grey Towers near Milford, Pennsylvania, a National Historic Site

He was a member of the Republican Party for most of his life, though he joined the Progressive Party for a brief period.

Pinchot enjoyed a close relationship with President Theodore Roosevelt, who shared Pinchot's views regarding the importance of conservation.

Hiram Johnson

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American attorney and politician who served as the 23rd governor of California from 1911 to 1917.

American attorney and politician who served as the 23rd governor of California from 1911 to 1917.

Johnson during his tenure as governor
Johnson and newly elected Lieutenant Governor A.J. Wallace, right, in the Los Angeles Herald, November 9, 1910
Refusing to give the lady [Peace Treaty of Versailles] a seat—by Senators Borah, Lodge and Johnson
'Gainst the League, Aint' You, Warren? July 26, 1920 political cartoon showing Johnson trying to force President Warren Harding against the League of Nations; Harding was already anti-League of Nations
Time cover, 29 Sep 1924
Hiram Johnson Sr. (left) with his oldest son, Hiram Johnson Jr. c. 1920–1925
The front page of the Los Angeles Times for August 7, 1945, reporting the US atomic bomb attack on Hiroshima and the death of Johnson.

He ran for vice president on Theodore Roosevelt's Progressive ticket in the 1912 presidential election.

Square Deal

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The Square Deal was Theodore Roosevelt's domestic program, which reflected his three major goals: conservation of natural resources, control of corporations, and consumer protection.

When Roosevelt ran for president on an independent Progressive Party ticket in 1912, in addition to these policies he proposed stringent new controls on the court system, especially state courts, to make them more democratic.