Proletariat

proletarianproletariansworking classindustrial working classindustrial workersproletariiproleworkersworkerlower class
The proletariat ( from Latin proletarius "producing offspring") is the class of wage-earners in an economic society whose only possession of significant material value is their labour-power (how much work they can do).wikipedia
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Social class

classsocial classesclasses
The proletariat ( from Latin proletarius "producing offspring") is the class of wage-earners in an economic society whose only possession of significant material value is their labour-power (how much work they can do). In Marxist theory, the proletariat is the social class that does not have ownership of the means of production and whose only means of subsistence is to sell their labor power for a wage or salary.
His simple understanding of classes in modern capitalist society is the proletariat, those who work but do not own the means of production; and the bourgeoisie, those who invest and live off the surplus generated by the proletariat's operation of the means of production.

Marxist philosophy

Marxist theoryMarxist philosopherMarxist
Marxist theory considers the proletariat to be oppressed by capitalism and the wage system.
The theory is also about the hustles of the proletariat and their reprimand of the bourgeoisie.

Capitalism

capitalistcapitalistscapitalistic
Marxist theory considers the proletariat to be oppressed by capitalism and the wage system. Karl Marx, who studied Roman law at the Friedrich Wilhelm University of Berlin, used the term proletariat in his socio-political theory of Marxism to describe a working class unadulterated by private property and capable of a revolutionary action to topple capitalism in order to create classless society. According to Marxism, capitalism is a system based on the exploitation of the proletariat by the bourgeoisie.
Modern capitalist societies—marked by a universalization of money-based social relations, a consistently large and system-wide class of workers who must work for wages, and a capitalist class which owns the means of production—developed in Western Europe in a process that led to the Industrial Revolution.

Marxism

MarxistMarxistsMarxist ideology
Karl Marx, who studied Roman law at the Friedrich Wilhelm University of Berlin, used the term proletariat in his socio-political theory of Marxism to describe a working class unadulterated by private property and capable of a revolutionary action to topple capitalism in order to create classless society. According to Marxism, capitalism is a system based on the exploitation of the proletariat by the bourgeoisie. In Marxist theory, the proletariat is the social class that does not have ownership of the means of production and whose only means of subsistence is to sell their labor power for a wage or salary.
According to Marxist theory, in capitalist societies, class conflict arises due to contradictions between the material interests of the oppressed and exploited proletariat—a class of wage labourers employed to produce goods and services—and the bourgeoisie—the ruling class that owns the means of production and extracts its wealth through appropriation of the surplus product produced by the proletariat in the form of profit.

Social class in ancient Rome

Roman societysocial hierarchyancient Roman society
The proletarii constituted a social class of Roman citizens owning little or no property.
Below the equites were three more classes of property-owning citizens; and lastly the proletarii, whose property was valued below 11,000 asses.

Marian reforms

Marianreformsreformed the organization of the army
As a result of the Marian reforms initiated in 107 BC by the Roman general Gaius Marius (157–86), which expanded the eligibility of military service to the urban poor, the proletarii became the backbone of the Roman army.

Working class

working-classlower classworkers
Karl Marx, who studied Roman law at the Friedrich Wilhelm University of Berlin, used the term proletariat in his socio-political theory of Marxism to describe a working class unadulterated by private property and capable of a revolutionary action to topple capitalism in order to create classless society.
In Marxist theory and socialist literature, the term working class is often used interchangeably with the term proletariat and includes all workers who expend both physical and mental labour (salaried knowledge workers and white-collar workers) to produce economic value for the owners of the means of production (the bourgeoisie in Marxist literature).

Karl Marx

MarxMarx, KarlMarxist
Karl Marx, who studied Roman law at the Friedrich Wilhelm University of Berlin, used the term proletariat in his socio-political theory of Marxism to describe a working class unadulterated by private property and capable of a revolutionary action to topple capitalism in order to create classless society.
In capitalism, this manifests itself in the conflict between the ruling classes (known as the bourgeoisie) that control the means of production and the working classes (known as the proletariat) that enable these means by selling their labour power in return for wages.

Bourgeoisie

bourgeoisburgherburghers
Marxism sees the proletariat and bourgeoisie (capitalist class) as occupying conflicting positions, since workers automatically wish their wages to be as high as possible, while owners and their proxies wish for wages (costs) to be as low as possible.
Nazism rejected the Marxist concept of internationalist class struggle, but supported the "class struggle between nations", and sought to resolve internal class struggle in the nation while it identified Germany as a proletariat nation fighting against plutocratic nations.

Lumpenproletariat

lumpenlumpen proletariatlower classes
In Marxist theory, the borders between the proletariat and some layers of the petite bourgeoisie, who rely primarily but not exclusively on self-employment at an income no different from an ordinary wage or below it – and the lumpenproletariat, who are not in legal employment – are not necessarily well defined.
They dismissed its revolutionary potential and contrasted it with the proletariat.

Petite bourgeoisie

petty bourgeoispetty bourgeoisiepetit bourgeois
In Marxist theory, the borders between the proletariat and some layers of the petite bourgeoisie, who rely primarily but not exclusively on self-employment at an income no different from an ordinary wage or below it – and the lumpenproletariat, who are not in legal employment – are not necessarily well defined.
The petite bourgeoisie is economically distinct from the proletariat and the lumpenproletariat social-class strata who rely entirely on the sale of their labor-power for survival; and also are distinct from the capitalist class haute bourgeoisie ("high bourgeoisie") who own the means of production and thus can buy the labor-power of the proletariat and lumpenproletariat to work the means of production.

Exploitation of labour

exploitationexploitation of workersexploit
According to Marxism, capitalism is a system based on the exploitation of the proletariat by the bourgeoisie.
The exploited are the proletariat.

Communism

communistcommunistscommunist ideology
These common interests put the proletariat in a position to unite and take power away from the capitalist class (see dictatorship of the proletariat), in order to create a communist society free from class distinctions.
The two classes are the working class—who must work to survive and who make up the majority within society—and the capitalist class—a minority who derives profit from employing the working class through private ownership of the means of production.

Means of production

productive propertydifferent organizations of productionforces
In Marxist theory, the proletariat is the social class that does not have ownership of the means of production and whose only means of subsistence is to sell their labor power for a wage or salary.
In contrast, the proletariat, or working class, comprises the majority of the population that lacks access to the means of production and are therefore induced to sell their labor power for a wage or salary to gain access to necessities, goods and services.

Private property

Privateprivate ownershipprivate land
Karl Marx, who studied Roman law at the Friedrich Wilhelm University of Berlin, used the term proletariat in his socio-political theory of Marxism to describe a working class unadulterated by private property and capable of a revolutionary action to topple capitalism in order to create classless society.
The property-owning (capitalist) class lives off passive property income produced by the working population by virtue of their claim to ownership in the form of stock or private equity.

Classless society

classlessclasslessnesswithout social classes
Karl Marx, who studied Roman law at the Friedrich Wilhelm University of Berlin, used the term proletariat in his socio-political theory of Marxism to describe a working class unadulterated by private property and capable of a revolutionary action to topple capitalism in order to create classless society.

Socialism

socialistsocialistssocialistic
Socialist parties have often struggled over the question of whether they should seek to organize and represent all the lower classes, or just the wage-earning proletariat.
The major characteristics of socialism (particularly as conceived by Marx and Engels after the Paris Commune of 1871) are that the proletariat would control the means of production through a workers' state erected by the workers in their interests.

Wage

wageswage ratelabor costs
In Marxist theory, the proletariat is the social class that does not have ownership of the means of production and whose only means of subsistence is to sell their labor power for a wage or salary.

Latin

Latin languageLat.la
The proletariat ( from Latin proletarius "producing offspring") is the class of wage-earners in an economic society whose only possession of significant material value is their labour-power (how much work they can do).

Wage labour

wage laborlaborlabour
The proletariat ( from Latin proletarius "producing offspring") is the class of wage-earners in an economic society whose only possession of significant material value is their labour-power (how much work they can do).

Dictatorship of the proletariat

proletarian dictatorshipdictatorship of proletariatleading role of The Party
These common interests put the proletariat in a position to unite and take power away from the capitalist class (see dictatorship of the proletariat), in order to create a communist society free from class distinctions.

Census

UK censuscensusespopulation census
The origin of the name is presumably linked with the census, which Roman authorities conducted every five years to produce a register of citizens and their property from which their military duties and voting privileges could be determined.

Roman Republic

RomanRepublicRomans
The only contribution of a proletarius to the Roman society was seen in his ability to raise children, the future Roman citizens who can colonize new territories conquered by the Roman Republic and later by the Roman Empire.

Roman Empire

RomanRomansEmpire
The only contribution of a proletarius to the Roman society was seen in his ability to raise children, the future Roman citizens who can colonize new territories conquered by the Roman Republic and later by the Roman Empire.

Centuriate Assembly

comitia centuriatapeoplecenturiae
Although included in one of the five support centuriae of the Comitia Centuriata (English: Centuriate Assembly), proletarii were largely deprived of their voting rights due to their low social status caused by their lack of "even the minimum property required for the lowest class" and a class-based hierarchy of the Comitia Centuriata.