Pronoun

pronounspronominalpronominal systempossessive pronounspronominal formspronominalsgender pronounsmasculine pronounsobject pronounpersonal pronoun
In linguistics and grammar, a pronoun (abbreviated ) has been theorized to be a word that substitutes for a noun or noun phrase.wikipedia
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Pro-form

proformcorrelative pronouncorrelatives
It is a particular case of a pro-form.

Reflexive pronoun

reflexiveHimselfHerself
Subtypes include personal and possessive pronouns, reflexive and reciprocal pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, relative and interrogative pronouns, and indefinite pronouns.
In general linguistics, a reflexive pronoun, sometimes simply called a reflexive, is an anaphoric pronoun that must be coreferential with another nominal (its antecedent) within the same clause.

Reciprocal pronoun

reciprocalreciprocalityreciprocals
Subtypes include personal and possessive pronouns, reflexive and reciprocal pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, relative and interrogative pronouns, and indefinite pronouns.
A reciprocal pronoun is a type of pronoun which is used for one of the participants of a reciprocal construction, i.e. a clause in which two participants are in a mutual relationship.

Indefinite pronoun

indefiniteindefinite pronounsanybody
Subtypes include personal and possessive pronouns, reflexive and reciprocal pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, relative and interrogative pronouns, and indefinite pronouns.
An indefinite pronoun is a pronoun that refers to non-specific beings, objects, or places.

Demonstrative

demonstrative pronoundemonstrativesdemonstrative pronouns
Subtypes include personal and possessive pronouns, reflexive and reciprocal pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, relative and interrogative pronouns, and indefinite pronouns.
Demonstrative constructions include demonstrative adjectives or demonstrative determiners, which qualify nouns (as in Put that coat on); and demonstrative pronouns, which stand independently (as in Put that on).

Part of speech

parts of speechclosed classword class
Pronouns have traditionally been regarded as one of the parts of speech, but some modern theorists would not consider them to form a single class, in view of the variety of functions they perform cross-linguistically. Pronouns (antōnymía) are listed as one of eight parts of speech in The Art of Grammar, a treatise on Greek grammar attributed to Dionysius Thrax and dating from the 2nd century BC.
Commonly listed English parts of speech are noun, verb, adjective, adverb, pronoun, preposition, conjunction, interjection, and sometimes numeral, article, or determiner.

Prop-word

For example, in That's not the one I wanted, the phrase the one (containing the prop-word one) is a pronominal.
The prop-word thus functions somewhat similarly to a pronoun, except that a pronoun usually takes the place of a whole noun (determiner) phrase (for example, "the red hat" may be replaced by the pronoun it).

Anaphora (linguistics)

anaphoraanaphoricanaphor
The use of pronouns often involves anaphora, where the meaning of the pronoun is dependent on an antecedent.
For example, in the sentence Sally arrived, but nobody saw her, the pronoun her is an anaphor, referring back to the antecedent Sally.

Dummy pronoun

dummy subjectdummypleonastic
Even third-person personal pronouns are sometimes used without antecedents ("unprecursed") – this applies to special uses such as dummy pronouns and generic they, as well as cases where the referent is implied by the context.
A dummy pronoun, also called an expletive pronoun or pleonastic pronoun, is a pronoun used to fulfill the syntactical requirements without providing explicit meaning.

Possessive

possessive pronounpossessive casepossessive pronouns
Subtypes include personal and possessive pronouns, reflexive and reciprocal pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, relative and interrogative pronouns, and indefinite pronouns.
It is common for languages to have independent possessive determiners (adjectives) and possessive pronouns corresponding to the personal pronouns of the language.

Referent

co-referreferencereferents
The referent of the pronoun is often the same as that of a preceding (or sometimes following) noun phrase, called the antecedent of the pronoun.
In the sentence John had his dog with him, for instance, the noun John and the pronoun him are co-referential, since they both refer to the same person (John).

Determiner

determinersDeterminer (linguistics)definite determiner
Certain types of pronouns are often identical or similar in form to determiners with related meaning; some English examples are given in the table on the right.
Most determiners have been traditionally classed along with either adjectives or pronouns, and this still occurs in classical grammars: for example, demonstrative and possessive determiners are sometimes described as demonstrative adjectives and possessive adjectives or as (adjectival) demonstrative pronouns and (adjectival) possessive pronouns respectively.

Interrogative word

interrogative pronouninterrogativeinterrogative pronouns
Subtypes include personal and possessive pronouns, reflexive and reciprocal pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, relative and interrogative pronouns, and indefinite pronouns.

Grammatical case

casecasescase marking
Personal pronouns may be classified by person, number, gender and case.
Case is a special grammatical category of a noun, pronoun, adjective, participle or numeral whose value reflects the grammatical function performed by that word in a phrase, clause or sentence.

Grammatical gender

genderfemininemasculine
Personal pronouns may be classified by person, number, gender and case.
Grammatical gender manifests itself when words related to a noun like determiners, pronouns or adjectives change their form (inflect) according to the gender of noun they refer to (agreement).

It (pronoun)

itIts (pronoun)pronoun ''it
It is a third-person, singular neuter pronoun (nominative (subjective) case and oblique (objective) case) in Modern English.

T–V distinction

T-V distinctioninformalformal
In sociolinguistics, a T–V distinction (from the Latin pronouns tu and vos) is a contrast, within one language, between various forms of addressing one's conversation partner or partners that are specialized for varying levels of politeness, social distance, courtesy, familiarity, age or insult toward the addressee.

Preposition and postposition

prepositionpostpositionprepositions
Object pronouns are used for the object of a verb or preposition (John likes me but not her).
A preposition or postposition typically combines with a noun or pronoun, or more generally a noun phrase, this being called its complement, or sometimes object.

List of glossing abbreviations

abbreviatedglossing abbreviationglossing abbreviations
In linguistics and grammar, a pronoun (abbreviated ) has been theorized to be a word that substitutes for a noun or noun phrase.

Thou

theethedidst
The word thou is a second-person singular pronoun in English.

Personal pronoun

personal pronounspersonalWeak pronoun
Subtypes include personal and possessive pronouns, reflexive and reciprocal pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, relative and interrogative pronouns, and indefinite pronouns.
Personal pronouns are pronouns that are associated primarily with a particular grammatical person – first person (as I), second person (as you), or third person (as he, she, it, they).

English personal pronouns

personal pronounsEnglishEnglish personal pronoun
Principal forms are shown in the adjacent table (see also English personal pronouns).
Modern English has very little inflection of nouns or adjectives, to the point where some authors describe it as an analytic language, but the Modern English system of personal pronouns has preserved some of the inflectional complexity of Old English and Middle English.

Government and binding theory

government and bindingmaximal projectionChomsky's Binding Theory
The grammatical behavior of certain types of pronouns, and in particular their possible relationship with their antecedents, has been the focus of studies in binding, notably in the Chomskyan government and binding theory.
The name refers to two central subtheories of the theory: government, which is an abstract syntactic relation applicable, among other things, to the assignment of case; and binding, which deals chiefly with the relationships between pronouns and the expressions with which they are co-referential.

One (pronoun)

oneimpersonal pronounimpersonal pronouns
One is a pronoun in the English language.

Dionysius Thrax

Dionysius the ThracianDionysios ThraxDionysios Trax
Pronouns (antōnymía) are listed as one of eight parts of speech in The Art of Grammar, a treatise on Greek grammar attributed to Dionysius Thrax and dating from the 2nd century BC.
Paragraph 11 treats the eight word classes, though strong doubts exist as to whether or not this division goes back to Dionysius Thrax, since ancient testimonies assert that he conflated proper nouns and appellatives, and classified the article together with pronouns.