Propaganda in Nazi Germany

propagandaNazi propagandaNaziGerman propagandaNazi propagandistNazi anti-Semitic propagandaNazi prop­a­gan­dapropaganda-basedpropagandisticanti-Semitic caricatures
The propaganda used by the German Nazi Party in the years leading up to and during Adolf Hitler's leadership of Germany (1933–1945) was a crucial instrument for acquiring and maintaining power, and for the implementation of Nazi policies.wikipedia
578 Related Articles

Nazi Germany

GermanGermanyNazi
The propaganda used by the German Nazi Party in the years leading up to and during Adolf Hitler's leadership of Germany (1933–1945) was a crucial instrument for acquiring and maintaining power, and for the implementation of Nazi policies. On 13 March 1933, the Third Reich established a Ministry of Propaganda, appointing Joseph Goebbels as its Minister. Directed by Kurt Gerron, it was meant to show how well the Jews lived under the "benevolent" protection of the Third Reich. The image that Signal transmitted was that of Nazi Germany and its New Order as the great benefactor of European peoples and of Western civilization in general.
Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels made effective use of film, mass rallies, and Hitler's hypnotic oratory to influence public opinion.

Der Stürmer

antisemitic newspaperStürmer
Der Stürmer, a Nazi propaganda newspaper, told Germans that Jews kidnapped small children before Passover because "Jews need the blood of a Christian child, maybe, to mix in with their Matzah." Posters, films, cartoons, and fliers were seen throughout Germany which attacked the Jewish community.
It was a significant part of Nazi propaganda, and was vehemently anti-Semitic.

Wehrmachtbericht

OKW communiquesOKW communique
One of the primary sources for propaganda was the Wehrmachtbericht, a daily radio broadcast from the High Command of the Wehrmacht, the OKW.
Wehrmachtbericht (literally: "Armed forces report", usually translated as Wehrmacht communiqué or Wehrmacht report) was the daily Wehrmacht High Command mass-media communiqué and a key component of Nazi propaganda during World War II.

Theresienstadt (1944 film)

TheresienstadtTheresienstadt. Ein Dokumentarfilm aus dem jüdischen SiedlungsgebietDer Führer schenkt den Juden eine Stadt
The hoax was so successful for the Nazis that they went on to make a propaganda film Theresienstadt.
Ein Dokumentarfilm aus dem jüdischen Siedlungsgebiet ("Theresienstadt: A Documentary Film from the Jewish Settlement Area"), unofficially Der Führer schenkt den Juden eine Stadt' ("The Führer Gives a City to the Jews"), was a black-and-white projected Nazi propaganda film.

Reich Ministry of Public Enlightenment and Propaganda

Propaganda MinistryPropaganda MinisterReich Minister of Propaganda
On 13 March 1933, the Third Reich established a Ministry of Propaganda, appointing Joseph Goebbels as its Minister.
As the central office of Nazi propaganda, it comprehensively supervised and regulated the culture and mass media of Nazi Germany.

Julius Streicher

StreicherGauleiter StreicherSTREICHER, Julius
In 1938, Julius Streicher published Der Giftpilz (The Poisonous Mushroom), a storybook that equated the Jewish people to poisonous mushrooms and aimed to educate children about the Jews.
He was the founder and publisher of the semi-pornographic and virulently anti-Semitic newspaper Der Stürmer, which became a central element of the Nazi propaganda machine.

Kurt Gerron

Directed by Kurt Gerron, it was meant to show how well the Jews lived under the "benevolent" protection of the Third Reich.
In 1944, Gerron was coerced into directing a Nazi propaganda film intended to be viewed in "neutral" nations (in Switzerland, Sweden, and Ireland, for example) showing how "humane" conditions were at Theresienstadt.

Mein Kampf

a voluminous bookMain KampfMy Battle
Adolf Hitler devoted three chapters of his 1925 book Mein Kampf, itself a propaganda tool, to the study and practice of propaganda.
In 1939, the Nazi propaganda ministry hired James Murphy to create an English version of Mein Kampf, which they hoped to use to promote Nazi goals in English-speaking countries.

Triumph of the Will

Triumph des WillensNazi propaganda filmLe Triomphe de la volonté
Triumph des Willens (Triumph of the Will, 1935) by film-maker Leni Riefenstahl chronicled the Nazi Party Congress of 1934 in Nuremberg.
Triumph of the Will (Triumph des Willens) is a 1935 Nazi propaganda film directed, produced, edited, and co-written by Leni Riefenstahl.

Department of Film (Nazi Germany)

Department of Filmfilm department
The Nazis produced many films to promote their views, using the party's Department of Film for organizing film propaganda.
The Department of Film was one of five departments that comprised the Central Party Propaganda Office of the NSDAP, established by Adolf Hitler in 1933 as part of the Reichspropagandaleitung.

International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement

Red CrossICRMInternational Red Cross
On 23 June 1944, the Nazis permitted the Red Cross to visit the concentration camp Theresienstadt to dispel rumors about the Final Solution, which was intended to kill all Jews.
Rossel's report was noted for its uncritical acceptance of Nazi propaganda.

Nuremberg Rally

Nuremberg RalliesNazi Party CongressNazi Party rallies
It followed an earlier film of the 1933 Nuremberg Rally produced by Riefenstahl, Der Sieg des Glaubens.
They were large Nazi propaganda events, especially after Adolf Hitler's rise to power in 1933.

HMS Ark Royal (91)

HMS ''Ark RoyalArk RoyalHMS Ark Royal
For example, considerable embarrassment resulted when the Ark Royal proved to have survived an attack that German propaganda had hyped.
This was an embarrassment for Goebbels and Nazi propaganda.

Die Deutsche Wochenschau

Deutsche WochenschauGerman propaganda newsreelWeekly Review
A main medium was Die Deutsche Wochenschau, a newsreel series produced for cinemas, from 1940.
The coordinated newsreel production was set up as a vital instrument for the mass distribution of Nazi propaganda at war.

Invasion of Poland

invaded PolandPolish Defensive WarGerman invasion of Poland
The main part of this propaganda campaign was the false flag Operation Himmler, which was designed to create the appearance of Polish aggression against Germany, in order to justify the invasion of Poland.
Nazi propaganda was one of the factors behind the German brutality directed at civilians which had worked relentlessly to convince the German people into believing that the Jews and Slavs were Untermenschen (subhumans).

The Victory of Faith

Der Sieg des GlaubensVictory of Faith
It followed an earlier film of the 1933 Nuremberg Rally produced by Riefenstahl, Der Sieg des Glaubens.
Der Sieg des Glaubens is Nazi propaganda for the Nazi Party, which funded and promoted the film, which celebrates the victory of the Nazis in achieving power when Hitler assumed the role of Chancellor of Germany in February 1933.

Das Deutsche Mädel

Das deutsche Mädel, in contrast, recommended that girls take up hiking, tending the wounded, and preparing to care for children.
Das Deutsche Mädel (, The German Girl) was the Nazi propaganda magazine aimed at girls, particularly members of League of German Girls.

New Order (Nazism)

New OrderNew European Ordernew order in Europe and the world
The image that Signal transmitted was that of Nazi Germany and its New Order as the great benefactor of European peoples and of Western civilization in general.
Through its wide use in Nazi propaganda it quickly gained coinage in Western media.

Joseph Goebbels

GoebbelsPaul Joseph GoebbelsJoseph
It was joined in 1927 by Joseph Goebbels's Der Angriff, another unabashedly and crudely propagandistic paper.
Nazi propaganda

Leni Riefenstahl

Leni ReifenstahlRiefenstahlLeni
Triumph des Willens (Triumph of the Will, 1935) by film-maker Leni Riefenstahl chronicled the Nazi Party Congress of 1934 in Nuremberg.
In interviews for the 1993 documentary The Wonderful, Horrible Life of Leni Riefenstahl, Riefenstahl adamantly denied any deliberate attempt to create Nazi propaganda and said she was disgusted that Triumph des Willens was used in such a way.

Horst Wessel

Horst-WesselAlbrecht HöhlerHorst-Wessel-Platz
It was mainly dedicated to attacks against political opponents and Jews – one of its most striking features were vehemently antisemitic cartoons by Hans Schweitzer – but also engaged in the glorification of Nazi heroes such as Horst Wessel.
After his death, he became a major propaganda symbol in Nazi Germany.

Nuremberg

NürnbergNuremberg, GermanyCity of Nuremberg
Triumph des Willens (Triumph of the Will, 1935) by film-maker Leni Riefenstahl chronicled the Nazi Party Congress of 1934 in Nuremberg.
After Adolf Hitler's rise to power in 1933 the Nuremberg rallies became huge Nazi propaganda events, a centre of Nazi ideals.

William Joyce

Lord Haw-HawGerman stationsHerr Joyce
One of the main targets was the United Kingdom, to which William Joyce broadcast regularly, gaining the nickname 'Lord Haw-Haw'.
William Brooke Joyce (24 April 1906 – 3 January 1946), nicknamed Lord Haw-Haw, was an American-born, Anglo-Irish Fascist politician and Nazi propaganda broadcaster to the United Kingdom during World War II.

Hans F. K. Günther

Hans GüntherGünther, Hans F. K.GÜNTHER, Hans Friedrich Karl
Other books such as Rassenkunde des deutschen Volkes (Ethnology of German People) by Hans F. K. Günther and Rasse und Seele (Race and Soul) by Dr.
This definition of "race" was used in Nazi propaganda.

Leonard Banning

Although Joyce was the most notorious, and most regularly heard, of British propagandists, other broadcasters included Norman Baillie-Stewart, Jersey-born teacher Pearl Vardon, British Union of Fascists members Leonard Banning and Susan Hilton, Barry Payne Jones of the Link and Alexander Fraser Grant, whose show was aimed specifically at Scotland, also broadcasting through the 'New British Broadcasting Service'.
Leonard Banning (born 1910, date of death unknown) was a British broadcaster of Nazi propaganda during World War II.