Property

propertiespatrimonyproprietaryproperty rightsland ownerprivate propertypatrimonialproperty ownershipproprietary rightright to own property
Property, in the abstract, is what belongs to or with something, whether as an attribute or as a component of said thing.wikipedia
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Renting

rentrentedrental
Depending on the nature of the property, an owner of property has the right to consume, alter, share, redefine, rent, mortgage, pawn, sell, exchange, transfer, give away or destroy it, or to exclude others from doing these things, as well as to perhaps abandon it; whereas regardless of the nature of the property, the owner thereof has the right to properly use it (as a durable, mean or factor, or whatever), or at the very least exclusively keep it.
Renting, also known as hiring or letting, is an agreement where a payment is made for the temporary use of a good, service or property owned by another.

Gift

giftspresentpresents
Depending on the nature of the property, an owner of property has the right to consume, alter, share, redefine, rent, mortgage, pawn, sell, exchange, transfer, give away or destroy it, or to exclude others from doing these things, as well as to perhaps abandon it; whereas regardless of the nature of the property, the owner thereof has the right to properly use it (as a durable, mean or factor, or whatever), or at the very least exclusively keep it.
In many countries, the act of mutually exchanging money, goods, etc. may sustain social relations and contribute to social cohesion.

Private property

Privateprivate ownershipprivate land
In economics and political economy, there are three broad forms of property: private property, public property, and collective property (also called cooperative property).
Private property is a legal designation for the ownership of property by non-governmental legal entities.

Estate (law)

estateestatesestate law
In the context of this article, it is one or more components (rather than attributes), whether physical or incorporeal, of a person's estate; or so belonging to, as in being owned by, a person or jointly a group of people or a legal entity like a corporation or even a society.
It is the sum of a person's assets – legal rights, interests and entitlements to property of any kind – less all liabilities at that time.

Lost, mislaid, and abandoned property

derelictunclaimed propertyabandoned
Depending on the nature of the property, an owner of property has the right to consume, alter, share, redefine, rent, mortgage, pawn, sell, exchange, transfer, give away or destroy it, or to exclude others from doing these things, as well as to perhaps abandon it; whereas regardless of the nature of the property, the owner thereof has the right to properly use it (as a durable, mean or factor, or whatever), or at the very least exclusively keep it.
Lost, mislaid, and abandoned property are categories of the common law of property which deals with personal property or chattel which has left the possession of its rightful owner without having directly entered the possession of another person.

Public property

publiccommunal propertypublicly owned
In economics and political economy, there are three broad forms of property: private property, public property, and collective property (also called cooperative property).
Public property is property that is dedicated to public use and is a subset of state property.

Collateral (finance)

collateralcollateralizedsecured
Depending on the nature of the property, an owner of property has the right to consume, alter, share, redefine, rent, mortgage, pawn, sell, exchange, transfer, give away or destroy it, or to exclude others from doing these things, as well as to perhaps abandon it; whereas regardless of the nature of the property, the owner thereof has the right to properly use it (as a durable, mean or factor, or whatever), or at the very least exclusively keep it.
In lending agreements, collateral is a borrower's pledge of specific property to a lender, to secure repayment of a loan.

Intellectual property

intellectual property rightsIPintellectual properties
Important widely recognized types of property include real property (the combination of land and any improvements to or on the land), personal property (physical possessions belonging to a person), private property (property owned by legal persons, business entities or individual natural persons), public property (state owned or publicly owned and available possessions) and intellectual property (exclusive rights over artistic creations, inventions, etc.), although the last is not always as widely recognized or enforced. Throughout the last centuries of the second millennium, with the development of more complex theories of property, the concept of personal property had become divided into tangible property (such as cars and clothing) and intangible property (such as financial instruments, including stocks and bonds; intellectual property, including patents, copyrights and trademarks; digital files; communication channels; and certain forms of identifier, including Internet domain names, some forms of network address, some forms of handle and again trademarks).
Intellectual property (IP) is a category of property that includes intangible creations of the human intellect.

Title (property)

titleland titlelegal title
A title, or a right of ownership, establishes the relation between the property and other persons, assuring the owner the right to dispose of the property as the owner sees fit.
In property law, a title is a bundle of rights in a piece of property in which a party may own either a legal interest or equitable interest.

Wealth

savingsaffluentwealthy
Capitalism has as a central assumption that property rights encourage their holders to develop the property, generate wealth, and efficiently allocate resources based on the operation of markets.
Wealth is the abundance of valuable resources or valuable material possessions.

Cooperative

co-operativeco-opcooperatives
In economics and political economy, there are three broad forms of property: private property, public property, and collective property (also called cooperative property).
The principles challenged the idea that a person should be an owner of property before being granted a political voice.

Personal property

chattelchattelsmovable property
Important widely recognized types of property include real property (the combination of land and any improvements to or on the land), personal property (physical possessions belonging to a person), private property (property owned by legal persons, business entities or individual natural persons), public property (state owned or publicly owned and available possessions) and intellectual property (exclusive rights over artistic creations, inventions, etc.), although the last is not always as widely recognized or enforced. In common law, real property (immovable property) is the combination of interests in land and improvements thereto, and personal property is interest in movable property.
Personal property is generally considered property that is movable, as opposed to real property or real estate.

Real property

landrealproperty
Important widely recognized types of property include real property (the combination of land and any improvements to or on the land), personal property (physical possessions belonging to a person), private property (property owned by legal persons, business entities or individual natural persons), public property (state owned or publicly owned and available possessions) and intellectual property (exclusive rights over artistic creations, inventions, etc.), although the last is not always as widely recognized or enforced. In common law, real property (immovable property) is the combination of interests in land and improvements thereto, and personal property is interest in movable property.
In English common law, real property, real estate, realty, or immovable property is land which is the property of some person and all structures (also called improvements or fixtures) integrated with or affixed to the land, including crops, buildings, machinery, wells, dams, ponds, mines, canals, and roads, among other things.

Inheritance

heirinheritedheirs
Treatment of intangible property is such that an article of property is, by law or otherwise by traditional conceptualization, subject to expiration even when inheritable, which is a key distinction from tangible property.
Inheritance is the practice of passing on property, titles, debts, rights, and obligations upon the death of an individual.

Common law

common-lawcommoncourts of common law
In common law, real property (immovable property) is the combination of interests in land and improvements thereto, and personal property is interest in movable property.
categorizing and prioritizing rights to property—for example, the same article of property often has a "legal title" and an "equitable title", and these two groups of ownership rights may be held by different people.

Security interest

securityequitable chargecharge
A security interest is a legal right granted by a debtor to a creditor over the debtor's property (usually referred to as the collateral ) which enables the creditor to have recourse to the property if the debtor defaults in making payment or otherwise performing the secured obligations.

Propertarianism

propertarianhigh valuation of private property rightsproprietarianism
Thus even ardent propertarians may disagree about IP. By either standard, one's body is one's property.
:Since [libertarians' in the United States] use of the word "liberty" refers almost exclusively to property, it would be helpful if we had some other word, such as "propertarian," to describe them.

Nonpossessory interest in land

nonpossessorynonpossessory interestnonpossessory interests
A nonpossessory interest in land is a term of the law of property to describe any of a category of rights held by one person to use land that is in the possession of another.

Russell Kirk

Kirk, Russell
"Separate property from private possession, and Leviathan becomes master of all... Upon the foundation of private property, great civilizations are built... The conservative acknowledges that the possession of property fixes certain duties upon the possessor; he accepts those moral and legal obligations cheerfully." (Russell Kirk, The Politics of Prudence)
4) A belief that property and freedom are closely linked;

John Locke

LockeLockeanLocke, John
(John Locke, Second Treatise on Civil Government)
Some see his statements on unenclosed property as having been intended to justify the displacement of the Native Americans.

Restatements of the Law

RestatementRestatement (Third) of PropertyFirst Restatement of Contracts
The Restatement (First) of Property defines property as anything, tangible or intangible whereby a legal relationship between persons and the state enforces a possessory interest or legal title in that thing.
In the period between 1923 and 1944, the American Law Institute published Restatements of Agency, Conflict of Laws, Contracts, Judgments, Property, Restitution, Security, Torts, and Trusts.

Trademark

trademarkstrade marktrademarked
Throughout the last centuries of the second millennium, with the development of more complex theories of property, the concept of personal property had become divided into tangible property (such as cars and clothing) and intangible property (such as financial instruments, including stocks and bonds; intellectual property, including patents, copyrights and trademarks; digital files; communication channels; and certain forms of identifier, including Internet domain names, some forms of network address, some forms of handle and again trademarks).
The law considers a trademark to be a form of property.

Law

legallawslegal theory
Various scholarly disciplines (such as law, economics, anthropology or sociology) may treat the concept more systematically, but definitions vary, most particularly when involving contracts.
Property law governs ownership and possession.

Ownership

ownerownersown
In the context of this article, it is one or more components (rather than attributes), whether physical or incorporeal, of a person's estate; or so belonging to, as in being owned by, a person or jointly a group of people or a legal entity like a corporation or even a society. A title, or a right of ownership, establishes the relation between the property and other persons, assuring the owner the right to dispose of the property as the owner sees fit.
Personal property is a type of property.

Theft

thiefthievesstealing
* Theft
In common usage, theft is the taking of another person's property or services without that person's permission or consent with the intent to deprive the rightful owner of it.