Prosody (Latin)

prosodyLatin prosodyclassical Indo-European versedactylichexameter versesIambic septenariusiambic trimeterLatin poetryquantities
Latin prosody (from Middle French prosodie, from Latin prosōdia, from Ancient Greek προσῳδία prosōidía, "song sung to music, pronunciation of syllable") is the study of Latin poetry and its laws of meter.wikipedia
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Horace

Quintus Horatius FlaccusHoratiusHoratian
The following article provides an overview of those laws as practised by Latin poets in the late Roman Republic and early Roman Empire, with verses by Catullus, Horace, Virgil and Ovid as models. Thus it was used in Ennius's Annals, Lucretius's On The Nature of Things, Virgil's "Aeneid" and Ovid's "Metamorphoses"; also in Juvenal's caustic satires and Horace's genial Talks and Letters.
Horace also crafted elegant hexameter verses (Satires and Epistles) and caustic iambic poetry (Epodes).

Syllable weight

heavy syllableheavylongum
Long syllables are sometimes called heavy and short ones light, using terminology borrowed from Sanskrit.
In classical Indo-European verse, as developed in Greek, Sanskrit, and Latin, distinctions of syllable weight were fundamental to the meter of the line.

Catullus

Gaius Valerius CatullusCatallusCatullan
The following article provides an overview of those laws as practised by Latin poets in the late Roman Republic and early Roman Empire, with verses by Catullus, Horace, Virgil and Ovid as models.

Plautus

Titus Maccius PlautusPlautineT. Maccius Plautus
He set a precedent followed by all later writers of the genre, notably Plautus and Terence.

Ennius

Quintus EnniusEnnian
Livius, a versatile author, also translated Homer's Odyssey into a rugged native meter known as Saturnian, but it was his near contemporary, Ennius (239–169 BC), who introduced the traditional meter of Greek epic, the dactylic hexameter, into Latin literature. Thus it was used in Ennius's Annals, Lucretius's On The Nature of Things, Virgil's "Aeneid" and Ovid's "Metamorphoses"; also in Juvenal's caustic satires and Horace's genial Talks and Letters.

Iambus (genre)

iambicIambusiambic poetry
He identified with, among others, Sappho and Alcaeus of Mytilene, composing Sapphic and Alcaic stanzas, and with Archilochus, composing poetic invectives in the Iambus tradition (in which he adopted the metrical form of the epode or "iambic distich").
Horace's poem is in couplets, where a line of iambic trimeter (six iambic feet) is followed by a line of iambic dimeter (four iambic feet).

Neoteric

NeoteroiNew poetryavant-garde poet
The late republic saw the emergence of Neoteric poets.
*Prosody (Latin)

Choliamb

scazoncholiambicsiambic
The Alexandrians' preference for short poems influenced Catullus to experiment with a variety of meters borrowed from Greece, including Aeolian forms such as hendecasyllabic verse, the Sapphic stanza and Greater Asclepiad, as well as iambic verses such as the choliamb and the iambic tetrameter catalectic (a dialogue meter borrowed from Old Comedy).
*Prosody (Latin)

Iambic trimeter

iambiciambic senariusiambic sēnārius
In ancient Greek poetry and Latin poetry, an iambic trimeter is a quantitative meter, in which a line consists of three iambic metra.

Epode

EpodesEpode of Horace
He identified with, among others, Sappho and Alcaeus of Mytilene, composing Sapphic and Alcaic stanzas, and with Archilochus, composing poetic invectives in the Iambus tradition (in which he adopted the metrical form of the epode or "iambic distich").
* Prosody (Latin)

Brevis in longo

brevis in longō
Venit and iram at the ends of lines 2 and 4 count as spondees by brevis in longo, despite their naturally short second syllables.
*Prosody (Latin)

Dactylic pentameter

hemiepespentameterdactylic
Standard cola include the hemiepes, the glyconic, and the lekythion.
*Prosody (Latin)

Satires (Horace)

SatiresSatiraeSatire
Thus it was used in Ennius's Annals, Lucretius's On The Nature of Things, Virgil's "Aeneid" and Ovid's "Metamorphoses"; also in Juvenal's caustic satires and Horace's genial Talks and Letters.
*Prosody (Latin)

Aeneid

The AeneidÆneidAEneis
Dactylic hexameter often has a bucolic diaeresis (a diaeresis between the fourth and fifth feet of a line), as in the first of the following lines from the introduction to Virgil's epic poem, the Aeneid.

Ovid

Publius Ovidius NasoOvidianOvidius
The pentameter came into Latin usage later than the hexameter and therefore it was not always handled with rigour by Catullus, compared for example with the later poets, especially Ovid.

Epistles (Horace)

EpistulaeEpistlesEpistles of Horace
Thus it was used in Ennius's Annals, Lucretius's On The Nature of Things, Virgil's "Aeneid" and Ovid's "Metamorphoses"; also in Juvenal's caustic satires and Horace's genial Talks and Letters.
*Prosody (Latin)

Anceps

ancipites
Also ti in scelesti is long by nature and it too is in anceps; the third foot would otherwise be a tribrach (uuu) thanks to the resolution of a long syllable into the two shorts in rui.

Middle French

Frenchmedieval French16th-century French
Latin prosody (from Middle French prosodie, from Latin prosōdia, from Ancient Greek προσῳδία prosōidía, "song sung to music, pronunciation of syllable") is the study of Latin poetry and its laws of meter.

Latin

Latin languageLat.la
Latin prosody (from Middle French prosodie, from Latin prosōdia, from Ancient Greek προσῳδία prosōidía, "song sung to music, pronunciation of syllable") is the study of Latin poetry and its laws of meter.

Ancient Greek

GreekClassical GreekGr.
Latin prosody (from Middle French prosodie, from Latin prosōdia, from Ancient Greek προσῳδία prosōidía, "song sung to music, pronunciation of syllable") is the study of Latin poetry and its laws of meter.

Roman Republic

RomanRepublicRomans
The following article provides an overview of those laws as practised by Latin poets in the late Roman Republic and early Roman Empire, with verses by Catullus, Horace, Virgil and Ovid as models.

Roman Empire

RomanRomansEmpire
The following article provides an overview of those laws as practised by Latin poets in the late Roman Republic and early Roman Empire, with verses by Catullus, Horace, Virgil and Ovid as models.

Livius Andronicus

Lucius Livius AndronicusLiviusLivi Andronici
The start of Latin literature is usually dated to the first performance of a play by Livius Andronicus in Rome in 240 BC.

Ancient Greek comedy

New ComedycomedyMiddle Comedy
Livius, a Greek slave, translated Greek New Comedy for Roman audiences.