Prostitution law

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[[File:Prostitution laws of the world2.svg|thumb|right|400px|wikipedia
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Prostitution

prostituteprostituteswhore
At one extreme, prostitution or sex work is legal in some places and regarded as a profession, while at the other extreme, it is a crime punishable by death in some other places.
Prostitution occurs in a variety of forms, and its legal status varies from country to country (sometimes from region to region within a given country), ranging from being an enforced or unenforced crime, to unregulated, to a regulated profession.

Sex tourism

sex touristssex touristsexual tourism
They argue that a system which allows legalized and regulated prostitution has very negative effects and does not improve the situation of the prostitutes; such legal systems only lead to crime and abuse: many women who work in licensed brothels are still controlled by outside pimps; many brothel owners are criminals themselves; the creation of a legal and regulated prostitution industry only leads to another parallel illegal industry, as many women do not want to register and work legally (since this would rob them of their anonymity) and other women can not be hired by legal brothels because of underlying problems (e.g., drug abuse); legalizing prostitution makes it more socially acceptable to buy sex, creating a huge demand for prostitutes (both by local men and by foreigners engaging in sex tourism) and, as a result, human trafficking and underage prostitution increase in order to satisfy this demand.
Generally, people who travel to engage in sexual activity, including with a prostitute, are subject to prostitution laws of the destination jurisdiction.

Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others

Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and the Exploitation of the Prostitution of OthersConventionconventionConventionConvention of 1949
The United Nations [[Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others]] favors criminalizing the activities of those seen as exploiting or coercing prostitutes (so-called "pimping" and "procuring" laws), while leaving sex workers free from regulation.

Procuring (prostitution)

pimppimpingmadam
They argue that a system which allows legalized and regulated prostitution has very negative effects and does not improve the situation of the prostitutes; such legal systems only lead to crime and abuse: many women who work in licensed brothels are still controlled by outside pimps; many brothel owners are criminals themselves; the creation of a legal and regulated prostitution industry only leads to another parallel illegal industry, as many women do not want to register and work legally (since this would rob them of their anonymity) and other women can not be hired by legal brothels because of underlying problems (e.g., drug abuse); legalizing prostitution makes it more socially acceptable to buy sex, creating a huge demand for prostitutes (both by local men and by foreigners engaging in sex tourism) and, as a result, human trafficking and underage prostitution increase in order to satisfy this demand. In many jurisdictions, prostitution – the commercial exchange of sex for money, goods, service, or some other benefit agreed upon by the transacting parties – is illegal, while in others it is legal, but surrounding activities, such as soliciting in a public place, operating a brothel, and pimping, may be illegal.
Procuring and brothels are legal in the Netherlands, Germany, Greece, New Zealand, and most of Australia and Nevada.

Prostitution in the Americas

DominicaGreenlandGrenada
Some Mexican cities have enacted "tolerance zones" ("zonas de tolerancia") which allow regulated prostitution and function as red light districts.

Prostitution in Europe

AndorraBosnia and HerzegovinaLiechtenstein
In eight European countries (Netherlands, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Greece, Turkey, Hungary, and Latvia), prostitution is legal and regulated.

Prostitution in Israel

Israel
This legislation makes Israel the tenth country to adopt the "Nordic model".

Prostitution in Ecuador

Ecuador
Prostitution in Ecuador is legal and regulated, as long as the prostitute is over the age of 18, registered, and works from a licensed brothel.

Prostitution in Panama

Panamaprostitution being legal in Panamá
Prostitution in Panama is legal and regulated.

Prostitution in Austria

Austriaprostitution sectors
Prostitution in Austria is legal and regulated.

Prostitution in Germany

Germanyprostitutebrothels in Germany
Full service sex work is widespread and regulated by the German government, which levies taxes on it.

Prostitution in the Netherlands

prostitutionNetherlandsa law on sex companies
Prostitution in the Netherlands is legal and regulated.

Prostitution in China

prostitutionChinaprostitute their daughters
However, it does not advocate a system of legal and regulated prostitution.

Prostitution in Hungary

Hungaryprostitute
Prostitution in Hungary has been legalized and regulated by the government since 1999.

Prostitution in New Zealand

New ZealandprostitutionContagious Diseases Act 1869
The 2003 decriminalisation of brothels, escort agencies and soliciting, and the substitution of a minimal regulatory model, created worldwide interest; New Zealand prostitution laws are now some of the most liberal in the world.

Prostitution in Mexico

Mexicolegal and regulated prostitution
Some Mexican cities have enacted "tolerance zones" ("zonas de tolerancia") which allow regulated prostitution and function as red light districts.

Prostitution in Namibia

Namibiais commonplace
In 2008, the Legal Assistance Centre, a Windhoek-based non-profit human rights organisation, called for the decriminalization of prostitution as a means of cutting the country's high HIV-AIDS rate as well as a means for maintaining the human rights of the prostitute themselves.

Prostitution in France

FranceRéglementationFrench system of licensed prostitution
France became officially "abolitionist" in 1960 when it ratified the 1949 UN [[Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others|Convention on the Suppression of Trafficking and the Exploitation of Prostitution]].

Sex industry

adult entertainmentadult industrysex trade
At one extreme, prostitution or sex work is legal in some places and regarded as a profession, while at the other extreme, it is a crime punishable by death in some other places.

Profession

professionsoccupationprofessed
At one extreme, prostitution or sex work is legal in some places and regarded as a profession, while at the other extreme, it is a crime punishable by death in some other places.