Protea

King ProteasCommon Sugarbush ProteaHighveld proteaProtea cryophilaSee textsugar bushessugarbushthe Proteas
Protea is both the botanical name and the English common name of a genus of South African flowering plants, sometimes also called sugarbushes (Afrikaans: suikerbos) or fynbos.wikipedia
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Proteaceae

ProteaceaProteaproteaceous
Within the huge family Proteaceae, they are a member of the subfamily Proteoideae, which has Southern African and Australian members.
Well-known genera include Protea, Banksia, Embothrium, Grevillea, Hakea and Macadamia.

Fynbos

Lowland fynbos and renosterveldMontane fynbos and renosterveldfynbos biome
Protea is both the botanical name and the English common name of a genus of South African flowering plants, sometimes also called sugarbushes (Afrikaans: suikerbos) or fynbos.
Several plant families are conspicuous in fynbos; the Proteaceae are prominent, with genera such as Protea, Leucospermum (the "pincushions"), and Leucadendron (the silver tree and "cone bushes").

Leucospermum

DiastelloideaCardinistyleBrevifilamentum
The common Proteaceae plants, e.g. Protea, Leucospermum, and Leucadendron are diploid organisms, thus they can freely hybridise with closely related species to form new cultivars.
Leucospermum differs from genera such as Protea, Leucadendron, Mimetes, Diastella, Paranomus, Serruria, and Orothamnus by having the flower heads in the axils of the leaves (although often very near the tip of the branch), small en inconspicuous bracts subtending the head, brightly coloured styles that are straight or curve toward the center of the flower head and extend far from the perianth, giving the flower head the appearance of a pincushion, and large nut-like fruits covered by a pale and soft layer that attracts ants.

Protea nitida

Waboomwaboom treeWaboom trees
Protea nitida, commonly called wagon tree, waboom or blousuikerbos, is a large, slow-growing Protea endemic to South Africa.

Protea caffra

P. caffraTransvaal-sugar bush
Protea is a flowering plant genus in the family Proteaceae.

Protea cynaroides

King ProteaNational flower of South AfricaP. cynaroides
Some protea flower species, like the king protea flower, are self-pollinating flowers.
It is a distinctive member of Protea, having the largest flower head in the genus.

Proteoideae

The Proteaceae are divided into two subfamilies: the Proteoideae, best represented in southern Africa, and the Grevilleoideae, concentrated in Australia and South America and the other smaller segments of Gondwana that are now part of eastern Asia.

Cape of Good Hope

Capethe Capethe Cape of Good Hope
Proteas attracted the attention of botanists visiting the Cape of Good Hope in the 17th century.
When flowering, however, proteas and ericas attract sunbirds, sugarbirds, and other species in search of nectar.

Protea roupelliae

P. roupelliae
Protea roupelliae is a species of Protea in the large family Proteaceae, and was named to commemorate Arabella Elizabeth Roupell (1817-1914) who spent two years in Cape Town and painted local flowers for her own pleasure.

Flowering plant

Angiospermsflowering plantsangiosperm
Protea is both the botanical name and the English common name of a genus of South African flowering plants, sometimes also called sugarbushes (Afrikaans: suikerbos) or fynbos.

Protea compacta

Its distribution is from the Kleinmond to Bredasdorp Mountains and is one of the best known proteas in the cut flower industry.

Protea lepidocarpodendron

Protea lepidocarpodendron, the black bearded sugarbush, is a bearded Protea that is placed in the section Speciosae.

Protea eximia

This protea species was discovered by James Niven ca.

Protea scolymocephala

Protea scolymocephala, the thistle protea, is a flowering plant from the genus Protea native to South Africa.

Protea aristata

This protea prefers rocky outcrops, which habit has led to the survival of very old specimens protected from fire by their rocky surrounds.

Botanical name

specific epithetepithetspecific name
Protea is both the botanical name and the English common name of a genus of South African flowering plants, sometimes also called sugarbushes (Afrikaans: suikerbos) or fynbos.

Genus

generageneric namegeneric
Protea is both the botanical name and the English common name of a genus of South African flowering plants, sometimes also called sugarbushes (Afrikaans: suikerbos) or fynbos.

Afrikaans

Afrikaans languageAfrikaans-speakingAfrikaans-language
Protea is both the botanical name and the English common name of a genus of South African flowering plants, sometimes also called sugarbushes (Afrikaans: suikerbos) or fynbos.

Carl Linnaeus

LinnaeusL.Carl von Linné
The genus Protea was named in 1735 by Carl Linnaeus after the Greek god Proteus, who could change his form at will, because they have such a wide variety of forms.

Proteus

proteanEidotheaGreek god
The genus Protea was named in 1735 by Carl Linnaeus after the Greek god Proteus, who could change his form at will, because they have such a wide variety of forms.

Herman Boerhaave

Hermann BoerhaaveBoerhaaveBoerh.
Linnaeus's genus was formed by merging a number of genera previously published by Herman Boerhaave, although precisely which of Boerhaave's genera were included in Linnaeus's Protea varied with each of Linnaeus's publications.

Gondwana

GondwanalandGondwanansouthern continents
Evidence from pollen fossils suggests Proteaceae ancestors grew in Gondwana, in the Upper Cretaceous, 75-80 million years ago.

Late Cretaceous

Upper CretaceousLate Cretaceous PeriodSenonian
Evidence from pollen fossils suggests Proteaceae ancestors grew in Gondwana, in the Upper Cretaceous, 75-80 million years ago.

Grevillea

Anadeniafan-leaf grevilleaGrevilleoideae
The Proteaceae are divided into two subfamilies: the Proteoideae, best represented in southern Africa, and the Grevilleoideae, concentrated in Australia and South America and the other smaller segments of Gondwana that are now part of eastern Asia.