Protests against the Iraq War

Protests against the 2003 Iraq waranti-war protestsMarch 20, 2010 anti-war protestIraq War protestsProtestsworldwide popular protests2002–2003 urban protests against the war2003 demonstrations against the war in Iraqanti-Iraq War rallyanti-war demonstrations
Beginning in 2002, and continuing after the 2003 invasion of Iraq, large-scale protests against the Iraq War were held in many cities worldwide, often coordinated to occur simultaneously around the world.wikipedia
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15 February 2003 anti-war protests

February 15, 2003 anti-war protest15 February 2003 anti-war protestFebruary 15, 2003
After the biggest series of demonstrations, on February 15, 2003, New York Times writer Patrick Tyler claimed that they showed that there were two superpowers on the planet: the United States and worldwide public opinion.
It was part of a series of protests and political events that had begun in 2002 and continued as the war took place.

2003 invasion of Iraq

invasion of IraqIraq War2003 Iraq War
Beginning in 2002, and continuing after the 2003 invasion of Iraq, large-scale protests against the Iraq War were held in many cities worldwide, often coordinated to occur simultaneously around the world.
On 15 February 2003, a month before the invasion, there were worldwide protests against the Iraq War, including a rally of three million people in Rome, which the Guinness Book of Records listed as the largest ever anti-war rally.

Peace movement

peace activistpeaceantiwar movement
These protests are said to be the biggest global peace protests before a war actually started; the peace movement is compared with the movement caused by the Vietnam War.
Global protests against the U.S. invasion of Iraq in early 2003 are an example of a more specific, short term and loosely affiliated single-issue "movement" —with relatively scattered ideological priorities, ranging from absolutist pacifism to Islamism and Anti-Americanism (see Human shield action to Iraq).

Barack Obama

ObamaPresident ObamaPresident Barack Obama
On October 2, the day President Bush signed into law Congress' joint resolution authorizing the war, a small-scale protest was held in Chicago, attended by a crowd of roughly 1,000 who listened to speeches by Jesse Jackson and then-Illinois State Senator Barack Obama.
On October 2, 2002, the day President Bush and Congress agreed on the joint resolution authorizing the Iraq War, Obama addressed the first high-profile Chicago anti-Iraq War rally, and spoke out against the war.

Halloween 2002 anti-war protest

around 150 protests
On October 31, around 150 protests took place across the United Kingdom, including Critical Mass bike rides, occupations, and mass demonstrations in Brighton, Manchester, Glasgow and London.
* Protests against the Iraq War

Million Worker March

Approximately 10,000 people attending the Million Worker March in Washington, D.C. conducted a pro-labor demonstration, with a very heavy additional focus against the war in Iraq as well.
Organizers presented an array of demands from better wages to an end to the war in Iraq.

Veterans for Peace

Veteran For PeaceBig Bend Veterans for PeaceVets for Peace
A coalition of United States-based groups, initiated by United for Peace and Justice, Rainbow/PUSH Coalition, National Organization for Women, Friends of the Earth, U.S. Labor Against the War, Climate Crisis Coalition, People's Hurricane Relief Fund, National Youth and Student Peace Coalition, and Veterans for Peace held a national mobilization against the war in New York City on April 29.
Starting in 2003, Veterans for Peace became a major participant of protests against the Iraq War.

A.N.S.W.E.R.

ANSWER CoalitionAct Now to Stop War and End RacismANSWER
Both protests were called by the ANSWER Coalition.
ANSWER joined with other groups to organize the March 20, 2010 anti-war protest in Washington, DC.

World Social Forum

Social Forum2005 World Social ForumWorld Social Forum (WSF)
The protests had been called by the Anti-War Assembly of the 2005 World Social Forum an annual conference of the alternative globalization movement which took place in Porto Alegre, Brazil on 26 January – 31, and were supported by coalitions from all over the world.
The global day of action was an international protest attended by an estimated 12 million people in 700 cities across 60 countries protesting the Bush Administration's plans to invade and occupy Iraq.

Opposition to the Iraq War

anti-warPopular opposition to war on Iraqanti-Iraq War
The opposition to the war manifested itself most visibly in a series of worldwide protests against the Iraq War during February 2003, just before the invasion of Iraq starting on March 20, 2003.

History of Iraq (2003–2011)

occupation of IraqPost-invasion Iraqoccupation
Tens of thousands of people demonstrated in Washington, D.C., San Francisco, Reno, Nevada and other cities around the world, in opposition to the occupation of Iraq.
This suspicion had already been a concern during the global protests against the war on Iraq.

Iraq War

Operation Iraqi FreedomIraqwar in Iraq
Protests to mark the second anniversary of start of the Iraq War were held across the world, in the U.S., United Kingdom, Canada, Central America, South America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Africa, Asia and the Middle East.

List of rallies and protest marches in Washington, D.C.

List of protest marches on Washington, D.C.List of protest marches on Washington, DCpolitical protests

Post–September 11 anti-war movement

The anti-war movement has organized massive anti-war rallies, in opposition to the War on Terrorism.

Anti-war movement

anti-warantiwaranti-war activist
Millions of people staged mass protests across the world in the immediate prelude to the invasion, and demonstrations and other forms of anti-war activism have continued throughout the occupation.

Public opinion in the United States on the invasion of Iraq

Popular opinion in the United States on the invasion of IraqAmerican popular opinion on invasion of Iraqpolls within the United States

The New York Times

New York TimesNY TimesNYT
After the biggest series of demonstrations, on February 15, 2003, New York Times writer Patrick Tyler claimed that they showed that there were two superpowers on the planet: the United States and worldwide public opinion.

Patrick Tyler

Tyler, Patrick
After the biggest series of demonstrations, on February 15, 2003, New York Times writer Patrick Tyler claimed that they showed that there were two superpowers on the planet: the United States and worldwide public opinion.