Province of Quebec (1763–1791)

Province of QuebecQuebecBritish Province of QuebecCanadaProvince of Quebec (1763–91)Province of Quebec (1763-1791)British CanadaBritish colony and provinceBritish colony of QuebecBritish Quebec
The Province of Quebec was a colony in North America created by Great Britain after the Seven Years' War which ended by the Battle of the Plain of Abraham.wikipedia
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Canada (New France)

CanadaColony of CanadaNew France
During the war, Great Britain's forces conquered French Canada.
In the Treaty of Paris of 1763, which formally ended the conflict, France renounced its claim to Canada in exchange for other colonies and the colony became the British colony of Quebec.

Upper Canada

UpperProvince of Upper CanadaUpper Canadian
In 1791, the territory north of the Great Lakes was divided into Lower Canada and Upper Canada. The Constitutional Act of 1791 divided the colony in two at the Ottawa River, so that the western part (Upper Canada) could be under the English legal system, with English speakers in the majority.
The Province of Upper Canada (province du Haut-Canada) was a part of British Canada established in 1791 by the Kingdom of Great Britain, to govern the central third of the lands in British North America, formerly part of the Province of Quebec since 1763.

Quebec Act

Quebec Act of 1774Province of QuebecQuebec Act, 1774
In 1774, the British Parliament passed the Quebec Act that allowed Quebec to restore the use of French customary law (Coutume de Paris) in private matters alongside the English common law system, and allowing the Catholic Church to collect tithes.
The territory found along the St. Lawrence River, called Canada by the French, was renamed Quebec by the British, after its capital city.

Royal Proclamation of 1763

Proclamation of 1763Royal ProclamationProclamation Line of 1763
By Britain's Royal Proclamation of 1763, Canada (part of New France) was renamed the Province of Quebec.
It established new governments for four areas: the province of Quebec, the new colonies of West Florida and East Florida, and Grenada.

Lower Canada

LowerProvince of Lower CanadaLower Canadian
In 1791, the territory north of the Great Lakes was divided into Lower Canada and Upper Canada.
The Province of Lower Canada was created by the "Constitutional Act of 1791" from the partition of the British colony of the Province of Quebec (1763–91) into the Province of Lower Canada and the Province of Upper Canada.

Illinois Country

Upper LouisianaPays des IllinoisIllinois
The act also enlarged the boundaries of Quebec to include the Ohio Country and part of the Illinois Country, from the Appalachian Mountains on the east, south to the Ohio River, west to the Mississippi River and north to the southern boundary of lands owned by the Hudson's Bay Company, or Rupert's Land.
Eventually, the eastern part of the Illinois Country became part of the British Province of Quebec, while the inhabitants chose to side with the Americans during the Revolutionary War.

United Empire Loyalist

United Empire LoyalistsLoyalistLoyalists
These United Empire Loyalists settled mainly in the Eastern Townships, Montreal, and what was known then as the pays d'en haut west of the Ottawa River.
United Empire Loyalists (or simply Loyalists) is an honorific which was first given by the 1st Lord Dorchester, the Governor of Quebec, and Governor-General of the Canadas, to American Loyalists who resettled in British North America during or after the American Revolution.

Kingdom of Great Britain

Great BritainBritishBritain
The Province of Quebec was a colony in North America created by Great Britain after the Seven Years' War which ended by the Battle of the Plain of Abraham.
New France became Quebec.

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican War of IndependenceAmerican Revolution
Owing to an influx of Loyalist refugees from the American Revolutionary War, the demographics of Quebec came to shift and now included a substantial English-speaking Protestant element from the former Thirteen Colonies.
Meanwhile, British officials in Quebec began lobbying Indian tribes to support them, while the Americans urged them to maintain their neutrality.

Pays d'en Haut

Enhaultpays d’en hautUpper Country
These United Empire Loyalists settled mainly in the Eastern Townships, Montreal, and what was known then as the pays d'en haut west of the Ottawa River.
The Pays d'en Haut was established in 1610 and dependent upon the colony of Canada until 1763, when the Treaty of Paris ended New France, and both were ceded to the British as the Province of Quebec.

Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester

Guy CarletonSir Guy CarletonLord Dorchester
He twice served as Governor of the Province of Quebec, from 1768 to 1778, concurrently serving as Governor General of British North America in that time, and again from 1785 to 1795.

Loyalist (American Revolution)

LoyalistLoyalistsTories
Owing to an influx of Loyalist refugees from the American Revolutionary War, the demographics of Quebec came to shift and now included a substantial English-speaking Protestant element from the former Thirteen Colonies.
Rebel agents were active in Quebec (which was then frequently called "Canada", the name of the earlier French province) in the months leading to the outbreak of active hostilities.

James Murray (British Army officer, born 1721)

James MurrayMurrayGeneral Murray
General James Murray FRS (21 January 1721, Ballencrieff, East Lothian, Scotland – 18 June 1794, Battle, East Sussex) was a British soldier, whose lengthy career included service as colonial administrator and governor of the Province of Quebec and later as Governor of Minorca from 1778 to 1782.

Frederick Haldimand

Sir Frederick HaldimandGeneral Sir Frederick HaldimandGovernor Haldimand
From 1778 to 1786, he served as Governor of the Province of Quebec, during which time he oversaw military operations against the northern frontiers in the war, and engaged in ultimately fruitless negotiations to establish the independent Vermont Republic as a new British province.

Henry Hamilton (governor)

Henry HamiltonHenryHenry "Hair Buyer" Hamilton
He served in North America as Lieutenant Governor of the Province of Quebec and later as Deputy Governor after the Revolutionary War.

Henry Hope (Quebec lieutenant governor)

Henry Hope
1746 – 13 April 1789) was a soldier and a colonial administrator in the Province of Quebec (1763–1791).

Hector Theophilus de Cramahé

CramahéHector Cramahé
Hector Theophilus de Cramahé (1 October 1720 – 9 June 1788), born Théophile Hector Chateigner de Cramahé, was Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Quebec, and titular Lieutenant Governor of Detroit.

American Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionary WarRevolutionary
Portions of its southwest (below the Great Lakes) were later ceded to the United States in the Treaty of Paris (1783) at the conclusion of the American Revolution although the British maintained a military presence there until 1796.
The great majority received land and subsidies for resettlement in British colonies in North America, known as United Empire Loyalists, especially Quebec (concentrating in the Eastern Townships), Prince Edward Island, and Nova Scotia.

Adam Mabane

1734 – January 3, 1792) was a physician, judge and political figure in the early Province of Quebec.

Ohio Country

OhioOhio territoryOhio Valley
The act also enlarged the boundaries of Quebec to include the Ohio Country and part of the Illinois Country, from the Appalachian Mountains on the east, south to the Ohio River, west to the Mississippi River and north to the southern boundary of lands owned by the Hudson's Bay Company, or Rupert's Land.
On June 22, 1774, the British Parliament passed the Quebec Act; it annexed the region to the province of Quebec.

Francis Maseres

Baron MaseresMaseres
He is known as attorney general of the Province of Quebec, judge, mathematician, historian, member of the Royal Society, and cursitor baron of the exchequer.

George Suckling

newly appointed judge
He also served as a member of the 1st General Assembly of Nova Scotia from 1758 to 1759 and was the first Attorney General in Quebec, serving under James Murray from 1764 to 1766, when he was removed from office.

Constitutional Act 1791

Constitutional Act of 1791Constitutional Actconstitution
The Constitutional Act of 1791 divided the colony in two at the Ottawa River, so that the western part (Upper Canada) could be under the English legal system, with English speakers in the majority.
The Act reformed the government of the Province of Quebec (1763-1791) to accommodate, amongst other Loyalists, the 10,000 United Empire Loyalists who had arrived from the United States following the American Revolution.

Canada

CanadianCANCanadians
The Royal Proclamation of 1763 established First Nation treaty rights, created the Province of Quebec out of New France, and annexed Cape Breton Island to Nova Scotia.

Thirteen Colonies

American coloniescoloniescolonial
Owing to an influx of Loyalist refugees from the American Revolutionary War, the demographics of Quebec came to shift and now included a substantial English-speaking Protestant element from the former Thirteen Colonies.
Those in the British West Indies, Newfoundland, the Province of Quebec, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Bermuda, and East and West Florida remained loyal to the crown throughout the war (although Spain reacquired Florida before the war was over, and later sold it to the United States).