Province of Turin

Roadmap of the Metropolitan City of Turin.
Satellite view of the western region.

Province in the Piedmont region of Italy.

- Province of Turin

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Provinces of Italy

Intermediate level between a municipality (comune) and a region (regione).

Provinces of Italy (grey borders), within Regions (solid borders)
Provinces of Italy in 1942 during the World War II
Trend in number of provinces from 1861 to 2010
Provinces as proposed by the Monti Cabinet in 2012
Abruzzo
Aosta Valley
Apulia
Basilicata
Calabria
Campania
Emilia-Romagna
Friuli-Venezia Giulia
Lazio
Liguria
Lombardy
Marche
Molise
Piedmont
Sardinia
Sicily
Tuscany
Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol
Umbria
Veneto

Metropolitan cities — in 2015, 14 metropolitan cities replaced the provinces of Bari, Bologna, Cagliari, Catania, Florence, Genoa, Messina, Milan, Naples, Palermo, Reggio Calabria, Rome, Turin, and Venice.

Metropolitan City of Turin

Metropolitan city in the Piedmont region, Italy.

A view of Turin.

It replaced the Province of Turin and comprises the city of Turin and 311 other municipalities (comuni).

Punta Nera

Punta Nera in summertime (SSW slopes)
Summit (on the right) and subsummmit of the Punta Nera as seen from the Grand Argentier

The Punta Nera is a mountain of Savoie (France) and of the Province of Turin (Italy).

Corriere della Sera

Italian daily newspaper published in Milan with an average daily circulation of 410,242 copies in December 2015.

Front page on 15 July 2009
Front page on 15 July 2009
The headquarters in Milan
Corriere della Sera journalists interviewing Russian President Vladimir Putin in June 2015

Corriere della Sera Torino (in the Province of Turin);

Nicolás Burdisso

Argentine football manager and former professional player who played as a centre back.

Burdisso with Argentina in 2011
Burdisso with Roma in 2012
Burdisso during a friendly match against Portugal in February 2011

The Burdisso brothers hold Italian passports due to their family origins in Collegno (Turin) and Revello (Cuneo), their grandparents' birthplaces in the Italian region of Piedmont.

Eugenio Brunetta d'Usseaux

Italian nobleman.

The mother was Carolyne Mattone of Benevello also come from an Italian noble family who owned the Castle of Mazzè (near Turin), related to the family Valperga since seven centuries before.

Azio Corghi

Italian opera composer, also a teacher and musicologist.

He was born at Cirié, in the Province of Turin, studied at the Turin and Milan conservatories and was a pupil of Bruno Bettinelli.

Marco Rizzo

Italian politician.

From 1986–1991, he was a member of the Turin Province party executive of the Italian Communist Party (PCI), and joined the Communist Refoundation Party (PRC) in 1991, serving as its representative to the Council of the Turin Province until 1995.

Mercedes Bresso

Italian politician (Democratic Party) who served as Member of the European Parliament from 2014 until 2019.

1995–2004, she was the President of the Turin Province, and, a Member of Regional Council (1985–1995) and of the Regional Executive (1994–1995) with responsibility for regional planning in Piedmont.

Franco-Provençal

Language within Gallo-Romance originally spoken in east-central France, western Switzerland and northwestern Italy.

Graziadio Isaia Ascoli
Title page of a Franco-Provençal dictionary from Saint-Étienne, France (1896): "The Key to the Gaga Dialect".
Language area map with standard place names and modern political divisions.
Conference hall at the 37th Fête internationale de l'arpitan, Saint-Etienne (France), 2016.
400px
Bilingual road sign (French-Valdôtain) in Introd, Aosta Valley.
Road sign for Charvex (La Balme de Thuy), Haute-Savoie, France after a name change in the 1990s to a historical Savoyard spelling. (Former village name: Charvet.)
Text of a carol about the appearance of a comet in 1682 by Jean Chapelon.
Cé qu'è l'ainô musical score showing verses 1, 2, 4, & 68.
Amélie Gex
Jean-Baptiste Cerlogne originating from Saint-Nicolas, Aosta Valley

Paradoxically, the same federal laws do not grant the language the same protection in the Province of Turin because Franco-Provençal speakers make up less than 15% of the population.