Prussia

PrussianPrussian statePrussian armyHistory of PrussiaKingdom of PrussiaPrussian governmentPreußenPrussiansGermanGermany
Prussia (Preußen, Old Prussian: Prūsa or Prūsija) was a historically prominent German state that originated in 1525 with a duchy centred on the region of Prussia on the southeast coast of the Baltic Sea.wikipedia
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Kingdom of Prussia

PrussiaPrussianPrussian court
The Kingdom of Prussia was thus abolished in favour of a republic—the Free State of Prussia, a state of Germany from 1918 until 1933. The union of Brandenburg and the Duchy of Prussia in 1618 led to the proclamation of the Kingdom of Prussia in 1701. Before its abolition, the territory of the Kingdom of Prussia included the provinces of West Prussia; East Prussia; Brandenburg; Saxony (including much of the present-day state of Saxony-Anhalt and parts of the state of Thuringia in Germany); Pomerania; Rhineland; Westphalia; Silesia (without Austrian Silesia); Lusatia; Schleswig-Holstein; Hanover; Hesse-Nassau; and a small detached area in the south called Hohenzollern, the ancestral home of the Prussian ruling family.
The Kingdom of Prussia (Königreich Preußen) was a German kingdom that constituted the state of Prussia between 1701 and 1918.

History of Germany

German historyGermanyMedieval Germany
Prussia, with its capital first in Königsberg and then, in 1701, in Berlin, decisively shaped the history of Germany.
1648 marked the effective end of the Holy Roman Empire and the beginning of the modern nation-state system, with Germany divided into numerous independent states, such as Prussia, Bavaria, Saxony, Austria and other states, which also controlled land outside of the area considered "Germany".

Abolition of Prussia

25 February 1947abolishedan Allied decree
It was de facto dissolved by an emergency decree transferring powers of the Prussian government to German Chancellor Franz von Papen in 1932 and de jure by an Allied decree in 1947.
Prussia was a region connecting the rest of Germany by land to Russia.

Old Prussians

PrussiansOld PrussianPrussian
The name Prussia derives from the Old Prussians; in the 13th century, the Teutonic Knights—an organized Catholic medieval military order of German crusaders—conquered the lands inhabited by them.
This region lent its name to the later state of Prussia (see King in Prussia).

Otto von Bismarck

BismarckChancellor BismarckPrince Bismarck
During the 19th century Prussian Chancellor Otto von Bismarck united the German principalities into a "Lesser Germany", which excluded the Austrian Empire.
Otto Eduard Leopold, Prince of Bismarck, Duke of Lauenburg (Born von Bismarck-Schönhausen; Otto Eduard Leopold Fürst von Bismarck, Herzog zu Lauenburg; 1 April 1815 – 30 July 1898), known as Otto von Bismarck, was a conservative Prussian statesman who dominated European affairs from the 1860s until 1890.

Free State of Prussia

PrussiaPrussianState of Prussia
The Kingdom of Prussia was thus abolished in favour of a republic—the Free State of Prussia, a state of Germany from 1918 until 1933.
After the end of World War II in 1945, Otto Braun approached Allied officials in occupied Germany to reinstate the legal Prussian government, but was rejected and Prussia was abolished in 1947.

Prussia (region)

PrussiaPrussianOld Prussia
Prussia (Preußen, Old Prussian: Prūsa or Prūsija) was a historically prominent German state that originated in 1525 with a duchy centred on the region of Prussia on the southeast coast of the Baltic Sea.
The former German kingdom and later state of Prussia (1701–1947) derived its name from the region.

Germans

Germanethnic Germanethnic Germans
Prussia (Preußen, Old Prussian: Prūsa or Prūsija) was a historically prominent German state that originated in 1525 with a duchy centred on the region of Prussia on the southeast coast of the Baltic Sea.
The former German state of Prussia took its name from the Baltic Prussians, although it was led by Germans who had assimilated the Old Prussians; the old Prussian language was extinct by the 17th or early 18th century.

Congress of Vienna

Vienna CongressTreaty of ViennaFinal Act of the Congress of Vienna
At the Congress of Vienna (1814–15), which redrew the map of Europe following Napoleon's defeat, Prussia acquired rich new territories, including the coal-rich Ruhr.
France lost all its recent conquests while Prussia, Austria and Russia made major territorial gains.

Coat of arms of Prussia

Prussian eaglePrussiaarms
The main coat of arms of Prussia, as well as the flag of Prussia, depicted a black eagle on a white background.
The state of Prussia developed from the State of the Teutonic Order.

Austria

AUTAustrianRepublic of Austria
In 1871, most German states (notably excluding Austria and Switzerland) united to create the German Empire under Prussian leadership.
With the rise of Prussia, the Austrian–Prussian dualism began in Germany.

Brandenburg-Prussia

BrandenburgPrussiaBrandenburgian
The union of Brandenburg and the Duchy of Prussia in 1618 led to the proclamation of the Kingdom of Prussia in 1701.
The second half of the 17th century laid the basis for Prussia to become one of the great players in European politics.

Flag of Prussia

colours of PrussiaPrussian war flagflag of Prussia from 1892–1935
The main coat of arms of Prussia, as well as the flag of Prussia, depicted a black eagle on a white background.
The state of Prussia had its origins in the separate lands of the Margraviate of Brandenburg and of the Duchy of Prussia.

Polonization

PolonizedPolonisationpolonised
Their monastic state was mostly Germanised through immigration from central and western Germany, and, in the south, it was Polonised by settlers from Masovia.
For Poles, it was a process of rebuilding Polish national identity and reclaiming Polish heritage, including the fields of education, religion, infrastructure and administration, that suffered under the prolonged periods of foreign occupation by the neighboring empires of Russia, Prussia, and Austria-Hungary.

Province of Pomerania (1815–1945)

Province of PomeraniaPomeraniaPrussian Province of Pomerania
Before its abolition, the territory of the Kingdom of Prussia included the provinces of West Prussia; East Prussia; Brandenburg; Saxony (including much of the present-day state of Saxony-Anhalt and parts of the state of Thuringia in Germany); Pomerania; Rhineland; Westphalia; Silesia (without Austrian Silesia); Lusatia; Schleswig-Holstein; Hanover; Hesse-Nassau; and a small detached area in the south called Hohenzollern, the ancestral home of the Prussian ruling family.
The Province of Pomerania (Provinz Pommern; Prowincja Pomorze) was a province of Prussia from 1815 to 1945.

Baltic Sea

BalticBaltic coastthe Baltic
Prussia (Preußen, Old Prussian: Prūsa or Prūsija) was a historically prominent German state that originated in 1525 with a duchy centred on the region of Prussia on the southeast coast of the Baltic Sea.
In the period between the 8th and 14th centuries, there was much piracy in the Baltic from the coasts of Pomerania and Prussia, and the Victual Brothers even held Gotland.

States of the Weimar Republic

StateGerman statesLänder
The Kingdom of Prussia was thus abolished in favour of a republic—the Free State of Prussia, a state of Germany from 1918 until 1933.
In Prussia, the largest of the German states, Hitler took direct control by appointing himself as Reichstatthalter. However, he passed his authority to Hermann Göring, who had been installed as Prussian prime minister without an election.

Gdańsk

DanzigGdanskDanzig (Gdańsk)
The port cities of Stettin (Szczecin) in Pomerania, Danzig (Gdańsk) in Prussia, Riga in Livonia, Königsberg (Kaliningrad), and Memel (Klaipėda) rose on the back of this wheat production.
The city's history is complex, with periods of Polish, Prussian and German rule, and periods of autonomy or self-rule as a free city state.

North German Confederation

North German FederationGermanyState
The country then grew rapidly in influence economically and politically, and became the core of the North German Confederation in 1867, and then of the German Empire in 1871. The combination of the black and white colours with the white and red Hanseatic colours of the free cities Bremen, Hamburg and Lübeck, as well as of Brandenburg, resulted in the black-white-red commercial flag of the North German Confederation, which became the flag of the German Empire in 1871.
The North German Confederation had nearly 30 million inhabitants, of whom eighty percent lived in Prussia.

Province of Hohenzollern

HohenzollernHohenzollern Province1850
Before its abolition, the territory of the Kingdom of Prussia included the provinces of West Prussia; East Prussia; Brandenburg; Saxony (including much of the present-day state of Saxony-Anhalt and parts of the state of Thuringia in Germany); Pomerania; Rhineland; Westphalia; Silesia (without Austrian Silesia); Lusatia; Schleswig-Holstein; Hanover; Hesse-Nassau; and a small detached area in the south called Hohenzollern, the ancestral home of the Prussian ruling family.
The Province of Hohenzollern (Provinz Hohenzollern) or the Hohenzollern Lands (Hohenzollernsche Lande) was a province of Prussia from 1850 to 1946.

Thuringia

ThüringenFree State of ThuringiaThuringen
Before its abolition, the territory of the Kingdom of Prussia included the provinces of West Prussia; East Prussia; Brandenburg; Saxony (including much of the present-day state of Saxony-Anhalt and parts of the state of Thuringia in Germany); Pomerania; Rhineland; Westphalia; Silesia (without Austrian Silesia); Lusatia; Schleswig-Holstein; Hanover; Hesse-Nassau; and a small detached area in the south called Hohenzollern, the ancestral home of the Prussian ruling family.
The Prussian territories around Erfurt, Mühlhausen and Nordhausen joined Thuringia in 1945.

Great power

Great Powersworld powermajor power
Prussia entered the ranks of the great powers shortly after becoming a kingdom, and exercised most influence in the 18th and 19th centuries.
The Congress of Vienna consisted of five main powers: the Austrian Empire, France, Prussia, Russia, and the United Kingdom (UK).

Austrian Empire

AustrianAustriaAustrians
During the 19th century Prussian Chancellor Otto von Bismarck united the German principalities into a "Lesser Germany", which excluded the Austrian Empire.
The Austrian Empire was the main beneficiary from the Congress of Vienna and it established an alliance with Britain, Prussia, and Russia forming the Quadruple Alliance.

Brandenburg

State of BrandenburgBrandenburg, GermanyBB
The combination of the black and white colours with the white and red Hanseatic colours of the free cities Bremen, Hamburg and Lübeck, as well as of Brandenburg, resulted in the black-white-red commercial flag of the North German Confederation, which became the flag of the German Empire in 1871.
In late medieval and early modern times, Brandenburg was one of seven electoral states of the Holy Roman Empire, and, along with Prussia, formed the original core of the German Empire, the first unified German state.

Klaipėda

MemelKlaipedaMemel (Klaipėda)
The port cities of Stettin (Szczecin) in Pomerania, Danzig (Gdańsk) in Prussia, Riga in Livonia, Königsberg (Kaliningrad), and Memel (Klaipėda) rose on the back of this wheat production.
During the planning of a campaign against Samogitia, Memel's garrison of the Teutonic Order's Livonian branch was replaced with knights from the Prussian branch in 1328.