Prussian Army

Royal Prussian ArmyPrussianArmyPrussian militaryPrussian troopsPrussian cavalryPrussian forcesPrussiansBrandenburg armyBrandenburg-Prussian Army
The Royal Prussian Army (Königlich Preußische Armee) served as the army of the Kingdom of Prussia.wikipedia
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Brandenburg-Prussia

BrandenburgPrussiaBrandenburgian
It became vital to the development of Brandenburg-Prussia as a European power.
The emerging Brandenburg-Prussian military potential, based on the introduction of a standing army in 1653, was symbolized by the widely noted victories in Warsaw (1656) and Fehrbellin (1675) and by the Great Sleigh Drive (1678).

Georg von Derfflinger

Derfflinger
Field Marshals of Brandenburg-Prussia included Derfflinger, John George II, Spaen and Sparr.
Georg von Derfflinger (20 March 1606 – 14 February 1695) was a field marshal in the army of Brandenburg-Prussia during and after the Thirty Years' War (1618–1648).

Kingdom of Prussia

PrussiaPrussianPrussian court
The Royal Prussian Army (Königlich Preußische Armee) served as the army of the Kingdom of Prussia.
The Great Elector incorporated the Junkers, the landed aristocracy, into the empire's bureaucracy and military machine, giving them a vested interest in the Prussian Army and compulsory education.

Goose step

goose-stepgoose-steppinggoosestep
Leopold introduced the iron ramrod, increasing Prussian firepower, and the slow march, or goose-step.
The step originated in Prussian military drill in the mid-18th century and was called the Stechschritt (literally, "piercing step") or Stechmarsch.

Silesian Wars

First Silesian WarSilesian WarSecond Silesian War
King Frederick the Great, a formidable battle commander, led the disciplined Prussian troops to victory during the 18th-century Silesian Wars and greatly increased the prestige of the Kingdom of Prussia.
King Frederick judged that his dynasty's claims were credible, and he had inherited from his father a large and well trained Prussian army and a healthy royal treasury.

Leopold I, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau

Leopold ILeopold I of Anhalt-DessauLeopold of Anhalt-Dessau
His friend, Leopold I, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau, served as the royal drill sergeant for the Prussian Army.
He was also a Generalfeldmarschall in the Prussian army.

Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg

Frederick WilliamFrederick William of BrandenburgFrederick William I, Elector of Brandenburg
Elector Frederick William developed it into a viable standing army, while King Frederick William I of Prussia dramatically increased its size and improved its doctrines.
Frederick William was a military commander of wide renown, and his standing army would later become the model for the Prussian Army.

Conscription

conscripteddrafteddraft
In the spring of 1644, Frederick William started building a standing army through conscription to better defend his state.
The defeat of the Prussian Army in particular shocked the Prussian establishment, which had believed it was invincible after the victories of Frederick the Great.

Frederick the Great

Frederick II of PrussiaFrederick IIFriedrich II of Prussia
King Frederick the Great, a formidable battle commander, led the disciplined Prussian troops to victory during the 18th-century Silesian Wars and greatly increased the prestige of the Kingdom of Prussia.
His most significant accomplishments during his reign included his military victories, his reorganization of Prussian armies, his patronage of the arts and the Enlightenment and his final success against great odds in the Seven Years' War.

John George II, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau

John George II of Anhalt-DessauJohn George IIJohn George
Field Marshals of Brandenburg-Prussia included Derfflinger, John George II, Spaen and Sparr.
John George made his military career in the service of the Prussian army; the Elector Frederick William named him a Generalfeldmarschall in 1670.

Hans Joachim von Zieten

ZietenGeneral ZietenGeneral von Zieten
The hussars and dragoons of General Zieten were also expanded.
Hans Joachim von Zieten, sometimes spelled Johann Joachim von Ziethen, (14 May 1699 – 26 January 1786), also known as Zieten aus dem Busch, was a cavalry general in the Prussian Army.

Canton System (Prussia)

canton systemCantons of Prussiaregimental cantons
In order to halt this trend, Frederick William I divided Prussia into regimental cantons.
The Canton System (German: Kantonsystem or Kantonssystem) or Canton Regulation (Kantonreglement) was a system of recruitment used by the Prussian army between 1733 and 1813.

Friedrich Wilhelm von Seydlitz

General SeydlitzGeneral von SeydlitzF. W. von Seydlitz
Frederick achieved one of his greatest victories, however, at Rossbach, where the Prussian cavalry of Friedrich Wilhelm von Seydlitz smashed a larger Franco-Imperial army with minimal casualties, despite being outnumbered two to one.
Friedrich Wilhelm Freiherr von Seydlitz (3 February 1721 – 8 November 1773 ) was a Prussian officer, lieutenant general, and among the greatest of the Prussian cavalry generals.

Battle of Leuthen

LeuthenVictory of Leuthen
After a series of complicated formations and deployments hidden from the Austrians, the Prussians successfully struck their enemy's flank at Leuthen, with Friedrich once again directing the battle; the Austrian position in the province collapsed, resulting in a Prussian victory even more impressive than the one at Rossbach.
The Battle of Leuthen was fought on 5 December 1757, at which Frederick the Great's Prussian army used maneuver and terrain to decisively defeat a much larger Austrian force commanded by Prince Charles of Lorraine and Count Leopold Joseph von Daun.

Zieten Hussars

3rd (Brandenburg) Hussars “von Zieten”Husaren-Regiment von Zieten (Brandenburgisches) Nr. 33.(Brandenburgisches) Husaren Regiment
The Prussian cavalry excelled during the battle, especially the Zieten Hussars.
3''), was a hussar regiment of the Prussian Army and later the Imperial German Army, founded in 1730 and named after its first Colonel, Hans Joachim von Zieten.

Charles William Ferdinand, Duke of Brunswick

Duke of BrunswickCharles William Ferdinand, Duke of Brunswick-WolfenbüttelCharles William Ferdinand
He delegated responsibility to the aged Charles William Ferdinand, Duke of Brunswick, and the army began to degrade in quality.
He was also a recognized master of 18th century warfare, serving as a Field Marshal in the Prussian Army.

Battle of Saalfeld

Saalfeldaction of Saalfeld
The Prussian Army was decisively defeated in the battles of Saalfeld, Jena and Auerstedt in 1806 and Napoleon occupied Berlin.
The Battle of Saalfeld took place on the 10 October 1806, at which a French force of 12,800 men commanded by Marshal Jean Lannes defeated a Prussian-Saxon force of 8,300 men under Prince Louis Ferdinand.

Battle of Jena–Auerstedt

Battle of Jena-AuerstedtBattle of JenaJena
The Prussian Army was decisively defeated in the battles of Saalfeld, Jena and Auerstedt in 1806 and Napoleon occupied Berlin.
The decisive defeat suffered by the Prussian Army subjugated the Kingdom of Prussia to the French Empire until the Sixth Coalition was formed in 1812.

War of the Fourth Coalition

Fourth CoalitionFourthPrussian campaign
The army had become outdated by the beginning of the Napoleonic Wars, and France defeated Prussia in the War of the Fourth Coalition.
French forces under Napoleon occupied Prussia, pursued the remnants of the shattered Prussian Army, and captured Berlin.

Hussar

HussarsHungarian HussarHussard
The new king also added sixteen battalions, five squadrons of hussars, and a squadron of life guards.
The value of the Hungarian hussars as light cavalry was recognised and, in 1721, two Hussaren Corps were organised in the Prussian Army.

Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher

BlücherPrince BlücherGebhard von Blücher
While some Prussian commanders acquitted themselves well, such as L'Estocq at Eylau, Gneisenau at Kolberg, and Blücher at Lübeck, they were not enough to reverse Jena-Auerstedt.
He was captured by the Prussians in 1760 during the Pomeranian Campaign and thereafter joined the Prussian Army, serving as a hussar officer for Prussia during the remainder of the Seven Years' War.

Hermann von Boyen

BoyenLeopold Hermann von Boyen
He led a Military Reorganization Committee, which included Gneisenau, Grolman, Boyen, and the civilians Stein and Könen.
Leopold Hermann Ludwig von Boyen (20 June 1771 – 15 February 1848) was a Prussian army officer who helped to reform the Prussian Army in the early 19th century.

Carl von Clausewitz

Clausewitzvon ClausewitzClausewitzian
Clausewitz assisted with the reorganization as well.
Clausewitz's father, once a lieutenant in the army of Frederick the Great, King of Prussia, held a minor post in the Prussian internal-revenue service.

German General Staff

General StaffChief of the General StaffGeneralstab
The Prussian General Staff, which developed out of meetings of the Great Elector with his senior officers and the informal meeting of the Napoleonic Era reformers, was formally created in 1814.
The German General Staff, originally the Prussian General Staff and officially Great General Staff (Großer Generalstab), was a full-time body at the head of the Prussian Army and later, the German Army, responsible for the continuous study of all aspects of war, and for drawing up and reviewing plans for mobilization or campaign.

Prussian Ministry of War

Prussian Minister of WarMinister of WarPrussian War Ministry
King Frederick William III created the War Ministry in 1809, and Scharnhorst founded an officers training school, the later Prussian War Academy, in Berlin in 1810.
The War Ministry was to help bring the Army under constitutional review, and, along with the General Staff systematize the conduct of warfare.