Psalm 22

PsalmDeus, Deus meusPsalm 21 (Vulgate)22Aijeleth-ShaharPsalm 22:29Psalm 22:6
Psalm 22 is the 22nd psalm of the Book of Psalms, generally known in English by its first verse, in the King James Version, "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?".wikipedia
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Psalms

psalmBook of Psalmspsalmody
Psalm 22 is the 22nd psalm of the Book of Psalms, generally known in English by its first verse, in the King James Version, "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?".

Sayings of Jesus on the cross

Seven Last WordsSeven Last Words from the CrossSeven Last Words of Christ
Verse 1, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?", is quoted in Mark 15:34; Matthew 27:46
Others point to this as the first words of Psalm 22 and suggest that Jesus recited these words, perhaps even the whole psalm, "that he might show himself to be the very Being to whom the words refer; so that the Jewish scribes and people might examine and see the cause why he would not descend from the cross; namely, because this very psalm showed that it was appointed that he should suffer these things."

Matthew 27

the twenty-seventh chapterMatthew 27:5127

Stripping of the Altar

strippingaltars are strippedstripped
In the Roman Rite, prior to the implementation of the Mass of Paul VI, this psalm was sung at the Stripping of the Altar on Maundy Thursday to signify the stripping of Christ's garments before crucifixion.
This was done to the accompaniment of Psalm 21 (Vulgate) (Deus, Deus meus) preceded and followed by the antiphon "Diviserunt sibi vestimenta mea: et super vestem meam miserunt sortem" ("They divided my clothes among them and cast lots for my garment").

Crucifixion of Jesus

CrucifixiondeathCrucifixion of Christ
The only words of Jesus on the cross mentioned in the Mark and Matthew accounts, this is a quotation of Psalm 22.

They have pierced my hands and my feet

Psalm 22:16controversythey have pierced my hands and feet
For example, Craig Blomberg, commenting on the allusions to Psalm 22 in the Gospel of Matthew, includes "he is surrounded by wicked onlookers (22:16a) who pierce his hands and feet (22:16b)" among "an astonishing number of close parallels to the events of Jesus' crucifixion".

Zechariah 12

Zechariah 12:1012:1012:13
*Related Bible parts: 2 Samuel 5, 1 Chronicles 3, Psalm 22, Isaiah 53, Matthew 27, Luke 3, John 19, Revelation 1, Revelation 16

King James Version

King James BibleKJVKing James Version of the Bible
Psalm 22 is the 22nd psalm of the Book of Psalms, generally known in English by its first verse, in the King James Version, "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?".

Hebrew Bible

TanakhbiblicalHebrew Scriptures
The Book of Psalms is the third section of the Hebrew Bible, and a book of the Christian Old Testament.

Christianity

ChristianChristiansChristian faith
The Book of Psalms is the third section of the Hebrew Bible, and a book of the Christian Old Testament.

Old Testament

Oldthe Old TestamentBiblical
The Book of Psalms is the third section of the Hebrew Bible, and a book of the Christian Old Testament.

Septuagint

LXXGreek Old TestamentGreek
In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 21 in a slightly different numbering system.

Vulgate

Latin VulgateVulgate BibleVulgata
In the Greek Septuagint version of the bible, and in its Latin translation in the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 21 in a slightly different numbering system.

Jewish history

Jewishhistory of Judaismhistory
The psalm is a regular part of Jewish, Catholic, Anglican and Protestant liturgies.

Catholic Church

Roman CatholicCatholicRoman Catholic Church
The psalm is a regular part of Jewish, Catholic, Anglican and Protestant liturgies.

Anglicanism

AnglicanAnglican ChurchAnglicans
The psalm is a regular part of Jewish, Catholic, Anglican and Protestant liturgies.

Esther

Queen EstherAsyaBible
Jewish interpretations of Psalm 22 identify the individual in the psalm with a royal figure, usually King David or Queen Esther.

Megillah (Talmud)

MegillahTractate MegillahMeg
Tractate Megillah of the Babylonian Talmud contains an extended collection of midrash expanding on the Book of Esther.