Psychedelic rock

psychedelicpsychedeliapsych-rockpsychpsychedelic metalpsychedelic bluespsych rockrockpsychedelic musicpsychedelic-rock
Psychedelic rock is a diverse style of rock music inspired, influenced, or representative of psychedelic culture, which is centred on perception-altering hallucinogenic drugs.wikipedia
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Rock music

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Psychedelic rock is a diverse style of rock music inspired, influenced, or representative of psychedelic culture, which is centred on perception-altering hallucinogenic drugs.
By the late 1960s "classic rock" period, a number of distinct rock music subgenres had emerged, including hybrids like blues rock, folk rock, country rock, southern rock, raga rock, and jazz-rock, many of which contributed to the development of psychedelic rock, which was influenced by the countercultural psychedelic and hippie scene.

Hard rock

heavy rockSleaze rockhard-rock
The genre bridged the transition from early blues and folk-based rock to progressive rock and hard rock, and as a result contributed to the development of sub-genres such as heavy metal.
Hard rock is a loosely defined subgenre of rock music that began in the mid-1960s, with the garage, psychedelic and blues rock movements.

Heavy metal music

heavy metalmetalmetal music
The genre bridged the transition from early blues and folk-based rock to progressive rock and hard rock, and as a result contributed to the development of sub-genres such as heavy metal.
With roots in blues rock, psychedelic rock, and acid rock, the bands that created heavy metal developed a thick, massive sound, characterized by highly amplified distortion, extended guitar solos, emphatic beats, and overall loudness.

Blue Cheer

Bruce StephensStephens
Heavier and more riff-based form of rock came from the mid-1960s psychedelic movement from bands like Blue Cheer and Sir Lord Baltimore that attempted to create a more intense form of psychedelic rock music.
Based in San Francisco, Blue Cheer played in a psychedelic blues rock or acid rock style, and are also credited as being some of the earliest pioneers of heavy metal, with their cover of "Summertime Blues" sometimes cited as the first in the genre.

Neo-psychedelia

neo-psychedelicacid punkneo-psychedelic rock
Since the late 1970s it has been revived in various forms of neo-psychedelia.
After post-punk, neo-psychedelia flourished into a more widespread and international movement of artists who applied the spirit of psychedelic rock to new sounds and techniques.

Acid rock

acidtrip rockheavy psych
In the 1960s, there existed two main variants of the genre: the whimsical British pop-psychedelia and the harder American West Coast acid rock.
The term, which derives its name from lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), is sometimes used interchangeably with "psychedelic rock", but may refer more specifically to a more musically intense subgenre or sibling to the psychedelic rock style.

Jefferson Airplane

StarshipThe Jefferson AirplaneJefferson Starship
The San Francisco music scene developed in the city's Haight-Ashbury neighborhood in 1965 at basement shows organised by Chet Helms of the Family Dog; and as Jefferson Airplane founder Marty Balin and investors opened The Matrix nightclub that summer and began booking his and other local bands such as the Grateful Dead, The Steve Miller Band and Country Joe & the Fish.
Jefferson Airplane was an American rock band based in San Francisco, California that became one of the pioneering bands of psychedelic rock.

Purple Haze

Purple HayesScuse me while I kiss the skysong
As a record chart hit in several countries and the opening number on the Experience's debut American album, it was many people's first exposure to Hendrix's psychedelic rock sound.

Counterculture of the 1960s

counterculture1960s counterculturecountercultural
The peak years of psychedelic rock were between 1967 and 1969, with milestone events including the 1967 Summer of Love and the 1969 Woodstock Rock Festival, becoming an international musical movement associated with a widespread counterculture before beginning a decline as changing attitudes, the loss of some key individuals and a back-to-basics movement, led surviving performers to move into new musical areas.
The personalities associated with the subculture, gurus such as Timothy Leary and psychedelic rock musicians such as the Grateful Dead, Pink Floyd, Jimi Hendrix, The Byrds, The 13th Floor Elevators, Ultimate Spinach, Janis Joplin, Crosby, Stills & Nash, The Doors, Blue Cheer, The Chambers Brothers, Country Joe and the Fish, Big Brother and the Holding Company, Jefferson Airplane and the Beatles, soon attracted a great deal of publicity, generating further interest in LSD.

The Byrds

ByrdsByrdsyMcGuinn, Clark & Hillman
In Unterberger's opinion, the Byrds, emerging from the Los Angeles folk rock scene, and the Yardbirds, from England's blues scene, were more responsible than the Beatles for "sounding the psychedelic siren".
As the 1960s progressed, the band was influential in originating psychedelic rock and raga rock, with their song "Eight Miles High" and the albums Fifth Dimension (1966), Younger Than Yesterday (1967) and The Notorious Byrd Brothers (1968).

The Beach Boys

Beach BoysBeach BoyBeach Boils
Molly Longman of mic.com writes that in terms of bridging the relationship between music and hallucinogens, the Beatles and the Beach Boys were the era's most pivotal acts.
Their influence spans many genres and decades, inspiring the development of movements such as psychedelia, power pop, progressive rock, punk, alternative, and lo-fi.

Having a Rave Up with The Yardbirds

Having a Rave UpHaving a Rave-Uprave-up
All were present on Having a Rave-Up, the Yardbirds' U.S.-only album on which Beck "emerged as a full-fledged guitar hero", in the view of Guitar Player magazine.
It includes songs with both guitarists and reflects the group's blues rock roots and their early experimentations with psychedelic and hard rock.

The Yardbirds

YardbirdsGodfrey TownsendYardbird
In Unterberger's opinion, the Byrds, emerging from the Los Angeles folk rock scene, and the Yardbirds, from England's blues scene, were more responsible than the Beatles for "sounding the psychedelic siren".
Originally a blues-based band noted for their signature "rave-up" instrumental breaks, the Yardbirds broadened their range into pop, pioneering psychedelic rock and early hard rock; and contributed to many electric guitar innovations of the mid-1960s.

Country Joe and the Fish

Country Joe & the FishGreg DeweyGregory Dewey
The San Francisco music scene developed in the city's Haight-Ashbury neighborhood in 1965 at basement shows organised by Chet Helms of the Family Dog; and as Jefferson Airplane founder Marty Balin and investors opened The Matrix nightclub that summer and began booking his and other local bands such as the Grateful Dead, The Steve Miller Band and Country Joe & the Fish.
Country Joe and the Fish was an American psychedelic rock band formed in Berkeley, California, in 1965.

Grateful Dead

The Grateful DeadDeadMother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions
The San Francisco music scene developed in the city's Haight-Ashbury neighborhood in 1965 at basement shows organised by Chet Helms of the Family Dog; and as Jefferson Airplane founder Marty Balin and investors opened The Matrix nightclub that summer and began booking his and other local bands such as the Grateful Dead, The Steve Miller Band and Country Joe & the Fish.
The band is known for its eclectic style, which fused elements of rock, folk, country, jazz, bluegrass, blues, gospel, and psychedelic rock; for live performances of lengthy instrumental jams; and for its devoted fan base, known as "Deadheads".

Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)

Norwegian Woodsong
The Beatles' "Norwegian Wood" from the December 1965 album Rubber Soul marked the first released recording on which a member of a Western rock group played the sitar.
Further to several British bands, including the Beatles, using guitars to imitate the drone and other musical textures of the sitar in their recordings, "Norwegian Wood" was influential in the development of raga rock and psychedelic rock during the mid 1960s.

Guitar solo

solosolosguitar solos
One such soloist, Jimi Hendrix, was a rarity in his field at the time: a black man who played psychedelic rock.

Steve Miller Band

The Steve Miller BandGerald JohnsonSteve Miller
The San Francisco music scene developed in the city's Haight-Ashbury neighborhood in 1965 at basement shows organised by Chet Helms of the Family Dog; and as Jefferson Airplane founder Marty Balin and investors opened The Matrix nightclub that summer and began booking his and other local bands such as the Grateful Dead, The Steve Miller Band and Country Joe & the Fish.
The group is best known for a string of (mainly) mid- to late-1970s hit singles that are staples of classic rock radio, as well as several earlier psychedelic rock albums.

Folk rock

folk-rockfolkfolk pop
He led directly to the creation of folk rock and the psychedelic rock musicians that followed, and his lyrics were a touchstone for the psychedelic songwriters of the late 1960s.
By the start of 1966, however, the group had begun to move away from folk rock and into the new musical frontier of psychedelic rock.

Eight Miles High

1966 hit songhis last Top 40 hit
In February and March, two singles were released that later achieved recognition as the first psychedelic hits: the Yardbirds' "Shapes of Things" and the Byrds' "Eight Miles High".
Musically influenced by Ravi Shankar and John Coltrane, "Eight Miles High", along with its McGuinn and Crosby-penned B-side "Why", was influential in developing the musical styles of psychedelic rock, raga rock, and psychedelic pop.

Good Vibrations

Good VibrationGood Vibrations: 40th Anniversary EditionVibes
The Beach Boys' October 1966 single "Good Vibrations" was another early pop song to incorporate psychedelic lyrics and sounds.
It heralded a wave of pop experimentation and the onset of psychedelic and progressive rock, and helped develop the use of the recording studio as an instrument.

Marty Balin

There's No ShoulderMartyn Buchwald
The San Francisco music scene developed in the city's Haight-Ashbury neighborhood in 1965 at basement shows organised by Chet Helms of the Family Dog; and as Jefferson Airplane founder Marty Balin and investors opened The Matrix nightclub that summer and began booking his and other local bands such as the Grateful Dead, The Steve Miller Band and Country Joe & the Fish.
While his output diminished after Surrealistic Pillow (1967) as Slick, rhythm guitarist/singer Paul Kantner, and lead guitarist Jorma Kaukonen matured as songwriters (a process compounded by Balin's eschewal of the group's burgeoning "ego trips"), his most enduring songwriting contributions—which were often imbued with a romantic, pop-oriented lilt that was atypical of the band's characteristic forays into psychedelic rock—include "Comin' Back to Me" (a folk rock ballad later covered by Ritchie Havens and Rickie Lee Jones), "Today" (a collaboration with Kantner initially written on spec for Tony Bennett that was prominently covered by Tom Scott), and, again with Kantner, the topical 1969 top-100 hit "Volunteers".

Revolver (Beatles album)

RevolverBeatles albumRevolver'' (Beatles album)
Contributing to psychedelia's emergence into the pop mainstream was the release of Beach Boys' Pet Sounds (May 1966) and the Beatles' Revolver (August 1966).
Revolver expanded the boundaries of pop music, revolutionised standard practices in studio recording, advanced principles espoused by the 1960s counterculture and inspired the development of psychedelic rock, electronica, progressive rock and world music.

The 13th Floor Elevators

13th Floor ElevatorsStacy SutherlandJohn Ike Walton
In October 1966, the Texas band 13th Floor Elevators debuted with The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators.
The Elevators were the first band to refer to their music as psychedelic rock, with the first-known use of the term appearing on their business card in January 1966.

Blues

blues musicthe bluespiano blues
Some of the earlier 1960s psychedelic rock musicians were based in folk, jazz, and the blues, while others showcased an explicit Indian classical influence called "raga rock".
One blues rock performer, Jimi Hendrix, was a rarity in his field at the time: a black man who played psychedelic rock.