Psychology

psychologicalpsychologistpsychologistspsychologicallyhuman psychologyPsychological Sciencespsychological researchpsychological theoryprofessional psychologypsycho
Psychology is the science of behavior and mind.wikipedia
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Mind

mentalhuman mindmental content
Psychology is the science of behavior and mind.
There is a lengthy tradition in philosophy, religion, psychology, and cognitive science about what constitutes a mind and what are its distinguishing properties.

Personality psychology

personalitypersonalitiespersonality theory
Psychologists explore behavior and mental processes, including perception, cognition, attention, emotion, intelligence, subjective experiences, motivation, brain functioning, and personality.
Personality psychology is a branch of psychology that studies personality and its variation among individuals.

Neuroscience

neurobiologyneuroscientistneurosciences
Psychologists seek an understanding of the emergent properties of brains, and all the variety of phenomena linked to those emergent properties, joining this way the broader neuroscientific group of researchers.
It is a multidisciplinary branch of biology that combines physiology, anatomy, molecular biology, developmental biology, cytology, mathematical modeling and psychology to understand the fundamental and emergent properties of neurons and neural circuits.

Phenomenology (psychology)

phenomenologyphenomenologicalPhenomenological psychology
Psychologists explore behavior and mental processes, including perception, cognition, attention, emotion, intelligence, subjective experiences, motivation, brain functioning, and personality.
Phenomenology within psychology (phenomenological psychology) is the psychological study of subjective experience.

Psychological resilience

resilienceresiliencyresilient
This extends to interaction between people, such as interpersonal relationships, including psychological resilience, family resilience, and other areas.
In simpler terms, psychological resilience exists in people who develop psychological and behavioral capabilities that allow them to remain calm during crises/chaos and to move on from the incident without long-term negative consequences.

Thought

thinkingthoughtsthink
Psychology includes the study of conscious and unconscious phenomena, as well as feeling and thought.
Because thought underlies many human actions and interactions, understanding its physical and metaphysical origins and its effects has been a longstanding goal of many academic disciplines including philosophy, linguistics, psychology, neuroscience, artificial intelligence, biology, sociology and cognitive science.

Attention

concentrationfocusinattention
Psychologists explore behavior and mental processes, including perception, cognition, attention, emotion, intelligence, subjective experiences, motivation, brain functioning, and personality.
Attention remains a major area of investigation within education, psychology, neuroscience, cognitive neuroscience, and neuropsychology.

Cognitive science

cognitive scientistcognitive sciencescognitive
In this field, a professional practitioner or researcher is called a psychologist and can be classified as a social, behavioral, or cognitive scientist.
Mental faculties of concern to cognitive scientists include language, perception, memory, attention, reasoning, and emotion; to understand these faculties, cognitive scientists borrow from fields such as linguistics, psychology, artificial intelligence, philosophy, neuroscience, and anthropology.

Emotion

emotionsemotionalemotional state
Psychologists explore behavior and mental processes, including perception, cognition, attention, emotion, intelligence, subjective experiences, motivation, brain functioning, and personality.
Research on emotion has increased significantly over the past two decades with many fields contributing including psychology, neuroscience, endocrinology, medicine, history, sociology of emotions, and computer science.

Counseling psychology

counselingcounseling psychologistcounselling
In addition, or in opposition, to employing empirical and deductive methods, some—especially clinical and counseling psychologists—at times rely upon symbolic interpretation and other inductive techniques.
Counseling psychology is a psychological specialty that encompasses research and applied work in several broad domains: counseling process and outcome; supervision and training; career development and counseling; and prevention and health.

List of psychology disciplines

sub-disciplines within psychology
Psychology has been described as a "hub science" in that medicine tends to draw psychological research via neurology and psychiatry, whereas social sciences most commonly draws directly from sub-disciplines within psychology.
This non-exhaustive list contains many of the sub-fields within the field of psychology:

Psyche (psychology)

psychehuman psychepsyches
The word psychology derives from Greek roots meaning study of the psyche, or soul (ψυχή psychē, "breath, spirit, soul" and -λογία -logia, "study of" or "research").
In psychology, the psyche is the totality of the human mind, conscious and unconscious.

William James

JamesJames, WilliamWilliam
In 1890, William James defined psychology as "the science of mental life, both of its phenomena and their conditions".
William James (January 11, 1842 – August 27, 1910) was an American philosopher and psychologist, and the first educator to offer a psychology course in the United States.

John B. Watson

WatsonJohn Broadus WatsonJohn Watson
However, this meaning was contested, notably by radical behaviorists such as John B. Watson, who in his 1913 manifesto defined the discipline of psychology as the acquisition of information useful to the control of behavior.
John Broadus Watson (January 9, 1878 – September 25, 1958) was an American psychologist who established the psychological school of behaviorism.

Consciousness

consciousconsciouslyhuman consciousness
Psychology includes the study of conscious and unconscious phenomena, as well as feeling and thought.
Recently, consciousness has also become a significant topic of interdisciplinary research in cognitive science, involving fields such as psychology, linguistics, anthropology, neuropsychology and neuroscience.

Behavioural sciences

behavioral sciencebehavioral sciencesbehavioural science
In this field, a professional practitioner or researcher is called a psychologist and can be classified as a social, behavioral, or cognitive scientist.
Examples of behavioral sciences include psychology, psychobiology, anthropology, and cognitive science.

Marko Marulić

MarulićMarco MaruloMarko Marulic
The Latin word psychologia was first used by the Croatian humanist and Latinist Marko Marulić in his book, Psichiologia de ratione animae humanae in the late 15th century or early 16th century.
He coined the term "psychology".

Aristotle

AristotelianAristotelesAristote
Historians note that Greek philosophers, including Thales, Plato, and Aristotle (especially in his De Anima treatise), addressed the workings of the mind.
His writings cover many subjects – including physics, biology, zoology, metaphysics, logic, ethics, aesthetics, poetry, theatre, music, rhetoric, psychology, linguistics, economics, politics and government.

Cognition

cognitivecognitive functioncognitive process
Psychologists explore behavior and mental processes, including perception, cognition, attention, emotion, intelligence, subjective experiences, motivation, brain functioning, and personality.
Cognitive processes are analyzed from different perspectives within different contexts, notably in the fields of linguistics, anesthesia, neuroscience, psychiatry, psychology, education, philosophy, anthropology, biology, systemics, logic, and computer science.

Wilhelm Wundt

WundtWilhelm Max WundtWilhelm Maximilian Wundt
In Heidelberg, Hermann von Helmholtz conducted parallel research on sensory perception, and trained physiologist Wilhelm Wundt.
Wilhelm Maximilian Wundt (16 August 1832 – 31 August 1920) was a physician, physiologist, philosopher, and professor, known today as one of the founders of modern psychology.

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz

LeibnizGottfried LeibnizGottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz
In Germany, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646–1716) applied his principles of calculus to the mind, arguing that mental activity took place on an indivisible continuum—most notably, that among an infinity of human perceptions and desires, the difference between conscious and unconscious awareness is only a matter of degree.
Leibniz made major contributions to physics and technology, and anticipated notions that surfaced much later in philosophy, probability theory, biology, medicine, geology, psychology, linguistics, and computer science.

Psychiatry

psychiatricpsychiatristpsychiatrists
Psychology has been described as a "hub science" in that medicine tends to draw psychological research via neurology and psychiatry, whereas social sciences most commonly draws directly from sub-disciplines within psychology.
]]Though the medical specialty of psychiatry uses research in the field of neuroscience, psychology, medicine, biology, biochemistry, and pharmacology, it has generally been considered a middle ground between neurology and psychology.

Hermann von Helmholtz

HelmholtzHermann HelmholtzHermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz
In Heidelberg, Hermann von Helmholtz conducted parallel research on sensory perception, and trained physiologist Wilhelm Wundt.
In physiology and psychology, he is known for his mathematics of the eye, theories of vision, ideas on the visual perception of space, color vision research, and on the sensation of tone, perception of sound, and empiricism in the physiology of perception.

On the Soul

De Animapsuchēagent intellect
Historians note that Greek philosophers, including Thales, Plato, and Aristotle (especially in his De Anima treatise), addressed the workings of the mind.
Although its topic is the soul, it is not about spirituality but rather a work in what might best be described as biopsychology, a description of the subject of psychology within a biological framework.

James McKeen Cattell

CattellJames CattellCattell, J. McK.
Wundt students Walter Dill Scott, Lightner Witmer, and James McKeen Cattell worked on developing tests for mental ability.
James McKeen Cattell (May 25, 1860 – January 20, 1944), American psychologist, was the first professor of psychology in the United States, teaching at the University of Pennsylvania, and long-time editor and publisher of scientific journals and publications, most notably the journal Science.