Public Opinion (book)

Public Opinionmanufacturing consentPublic Opinion'' (book)
Public Opinion is a book by Walter Lippmann, published in 1922.wikipedia
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Walter Lippmann

Walter LippmanLippmannLippmann, Walter
Public Opinion is a book by Walter Lippmann, published in 1922.
Walter Lippmann (September 23, 1889 – December 14, 1974) was an American writer, reporter, and political commentator famous for being among the first to introduce the concept of Cold War, coining the term "stereotype" in the modern psychological meaning, and critiquing media and democracy in his newspaper column and several books, most notably his 1922 book Public Opinion.

Stereotype

stereotypesstereotypicalstereotyping
The detailed descriptions of the cognitive limitations people face in comprehending their sociopolitical and cultural environments, leading them to apply an evolving catalogue of general stereotypes to a complex reality, rendered Public Opinion a seminal text in the fields of media studies, political science, and social psychology.
However, it was not until 1922 that "stereotype" was first used in the modern psychological sense by American journalist Walter Lippmann in his work Public Opinion.

The Phantom Public

It followed his better-known work Public Opinion (1922) and moves further toward disillusionment with democratic politics.

Manufacturing Consent

Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass MediaManufactured Consentbook of the same name
The phrase "manufacture of consent" was introduced, which the academics Noam Chomsky and Edward S. Herman used as the title of their book Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media (1988).
The title derives from the phrase "the manufacture of consent," employed in the book Public Opinion (1922), by Walter Lippmann (1889–1974).

Group cohesiveness

social cohesiongroup cohesioncohesion
It is a critical assessment of functional democratic government, especially of the irrational and often self-serving social perceptions that influence individual behavior and prevent optimal societal cohesion.

Media studies

mediamedia theorymedia criticism
The detailed descriptions of the cognitive limitations people face in comprehending their sociopolitical and cultural environments, leading them to apply an evolving catalogue of general stereotypes to a complex reality, rendered Public Opinion a seminal text in the fields of media studies, political science, and social psychology.

Political science

political scientistPolitical Sciencespolitical analyst
The detailed descriptions of the cognitive limitations people face in comprehending their sociopolitical and cultural environments, leading them to apply an evolving catalogue of general stereotypes to a complex reality, rendered Public Opinion a seminal text in the fields of media studies, political science, and social psychology.

Social psychology

social psychologistsocialsocial psychological
The detailed descriptions of the cognitive limitations people face in comprehending their sociopolitical and cultural environments, leading them to apply an evolving catalogue of general stereotypes to a complex reality, rendered Public Opinion a seminal text in the fields of media studies, political science, and social psychology.

Mental image

mind's eyevisualizationmental imagery
People construct a pseudo-environment that is a subjective, biased, and necessarily abridged mental image of the world, and to a degree, everyone's pseudo-environment is a fiction.

Mass media

mediapressmedia company
Some of the general implications of the interactions among one's psychology, environment, and the mass communications media are highlighted.

Propaganda

propagandistpropagandisticpropagandists
Propaganda is inherently impossible without a barrier of censorship between the event and the public. Public Opinion proposes that the increased power of propaganda and the specialized knowledge required for effective political decisions have rendered the traditional notion of democracy impossible.

Censorship

censoredcensorcensors
Propaganda is inherently impossible without a barrier of censorship between the event and the public.

Parallax

trigonometric parallaxsolar parallaxmotion parallax
The blame for that perceptual parallax falls not upon the mass media technology (print, radio, cinema, or, inferentially, television) or logistical concerns but upon certain members of society who attend to life with little intellectual engagement.

Technology

technologiestechnologicaltechnical
The blame for that perceptual parallax falls not upon the mass media technology (print, radio, cinema, or, inferentially, television) or logistical concerns but upon certain members of society who attend to life with little intellectual engagement.

Intellectualism

intellectualintellectualistintellectually
The blame for that perceptual parallax falls not upon the mass media technology (print, radio, cinema, or, inferentially, television) or logistical concerns but upon certain members of society who attend to life with little intellectual engagement.

Editorial board

editorial boardseditorial advisory boardBoard of Editors

Public interest

public goodpublic interest grouppublic-interest
Lippman argues that, when properly deployed in the public interest, the manufacture of consent is useful and necessary for a cohesive society, because, in many cases, "the common interests" of the public are not obvious except upon careful analysis of the collected data, a critical intellectual exercise in which most people are uninterested or are incapable of doing.

Consent

consensualaffirmative consentnon-consensual
Lippman argues that, when properly deployed in the public interest, the manufacture of consent is useful and necessary for a cohesive society, because, in many cases, "the common interests" of the public are not obvious except upon careful analysis of the collected data, a critical intellectual exercise in which most people are uninterested or are incapable of doing.

Democracy

democraticdemocraciesdemocratically
Public Opinion proposes that the increased power of propaganda and the specialized knowledge required for effective political decisions have rendered the traditional notion of democracy impossible.

Noam Chomsky

ChomskyChomsky, NoamChomskyan
The phrase "manufacture of consent" was introduced, which the academics Noam Chomsky and Edward S. Herman used as the title of their book Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media (1988).

Edward S. Herman

Edward HermanHermanEdward S Herman
The phrase "manufacture of consent" was introduced, which the academics Noam Chomsky and Edward S. Herman used as the title of their book Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media (1988).