Public rhetoric

Public rhetoric refers to discourse both within a group of people and between groups, often centering on the process by which individual or group discourse seeks membership in the larger public discourse.wikipedia
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Digital rhetoric

eRhetoriccirculate
Eyman wrote a print and a digital version of this text and includes a statement encouraging readers to take, revise, reuse, and circulate his original text, which is why he made the book available for free online.

Phaedra Pezzullo

This challenge to Enlightenment notions of identity is exemplified by the work of Phaedra Pezzullo.

Individual

individualityindividualshuman identity
Public rhetoric refers to discourse both within a group of people and between groups, often centering on the process by which individual or group discourse seeks membership in the larger public discourse.

Public

general publicgeneral audiencegeneral interest
Public rhetoric can also involve rhetoric being used within the general populace to foster social change and encourage agency on behalf of the participants of public rhetoric.

Rhetoric

rhetoricianrhetorrhetorical
Public rhetoric can also involve rhetoric being used within the general populace to foster social change and encourage agency on behalf of the participants of public rhetoric.

Agency (sociology)

agencysocial actoragents
Public rhetoric can also involve rhetoric being used within the general populace to foster social change and encourage agency on behalf of the participants of public rhetoric.

Tourism

touristtouriststourism industry
Furthermore, scholars of public rhetoric often employ the language of tourism to examine how identity is negotiated between individuals and groups and how this negotiation impacts individuals and groups on a variety of levels, ranging from the local to the global.

Michael Warner

Fear of a Queer Planet
Michael Warner describes a public as "being self-organized, …a relationship among strangers …[where] merely paying attention can be enough to make [one] a member."

LGBT

LGBTQLGBTQ+lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender
Warner describes the facilities of counterpublic using the LGBTQ+ community:

Subaltern (postcolonialism)

subalternCan the Subaltern Speak?subaltern studies
The struggle for political and social power within the public sphere between publics gives rise to dominant and weaker internal publics within a public, namely subaltern and bourgeois publics, respectively.

Bourgeoisie

bourgeoisburgherburghers
The struggle for political and social power within the public sphere between publics gives rise to dominant and weaker internal publics within a public, namely subaltern and bourgeois publics, respectively.

Gay

gayshomosexualgay men
While graffiti is often considered a lesser art form compared to the classical arts such as music, canvas painting, and sculpture, the mural projects "actually work to carry out a 'normative' prescription of landscape. The normalization has the ability to eradicate the potential for alternative constructions of public expression. As [Kurt] Iveson observes, 'A legal mural might have some effect in making ... people's culture more visible in public space, but often this is on someone else's' terms.'" Keith Herring argues that the dominant images of a gay counterpublic produce "clones" representing "well-built," effeminate, white males.

Definitions of whiteness in the United States

whitea new racial categoryconsidered white
While whiteness is idealized, racial minority imagery and representation was and remains marginalized.

Service-learning

service learning
As service learning and civic engagement increase at colleges and universities, rhetoric begins the process of regrouping and becoming relevant in the community outside of the academy.

Civic engagement

civiccivic dutycivic organization
As service learning and civic engagement increase at colleges and universities, rhetoric begins the process of regrouping and becoming relevant in the community outside of the academy.

Kairos

Divine timingkairotic momenttime
Hopefully the scholar perceives a kairotic moment in which they come to an understanding of the relationship between the community and public rhetoric and are then, in turn, able to write and publish on their work.

Ethos

characteretheacharacter as a people
Aside from the reciprocity that inherently comes from performing social activism within the general community, engaging with those outside of academe allows scholars to improve the public's general conception of rhetoric, thereby increasing the field's ethos in the eyes of the general public.

Epideictic

commendatory versecommendatory poemepideictic rhetoric
For example, in Cynthia Sheard's article, "The Public Value of Epideictic Rhetoric," she discusses how epideictic rhetoric, which has traditionally elicited a negative public opinion, can be used to foster social change.

The Practice of Everyday Life

In his book The Practice of Everyday Life, Michel de Certeau, defines places as an "instantaneous configuration of positions."

Michel de Certeau

de CerteauMichael de Certeau
In his book The Practice of Everyday Life, Michel de Certeau, defines places as an "instantaneous configuration of positions."

Michel Foucault

FoucaultFoucauldianMichael Foucault
Michel Foucault built on Certeau's definition of space in his essay, "Of Other Spaces: Utopias and Heterotopias," pointing out that spaces were defined by "a set of relations that delineates sites which are irreducible to one another and absolutely not superimposable on one another."

Utopia

utopianutopianismutopian community
According to Foucault, utopias are spaces with no real place which present society in its perfected form.

Heterotopia (space)

heterotopiaheterotopiasheterotopia space of otherness
Heterotopias are real spaces that exist in every culture.

Jürgen Habermas

HabermasHabermasianJurgen Habermas
Jürgen Habermas, for instance, chronicles the emergence of the concept of the individual in Western society, only to demonstrate the individual's sublimation before the regulating function of the public sphere: "With the interweaving of the public and private realm, not only do the political authorities assume certain functions in the sphere of commodity exchange and social labor, but conversely social powers now assume political functions. This leads to a kind of 'refeudalization' of the public sphere."

Age of Enlightenment

Enlightenmentthe EnlightenmentFrench Enlightenment
This challenge to Enlightenment notions of identity is exemplified by the work of Phaedra Pezzullo.