Puerto Ricans

Puerto RicanPuerto Rican peopleBoricuaPuerto Ricopeople of Puerto Ricoits peoplePuerto Rican descentPuerto Rican-bornthe people of Puerto RicoThe Puerto Ricans
Puerto Ricans (Puertorriqueños; or boricuas) are the people of Puerto Rico, the inhabitants, and citizens of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (a United States territory), and their descendants.wikipedia
2,101 Related Articles

White Puerto Ricans

WhiteEuropean featuresWhite Puerto Rican
White Puerto Ricans are officially counted as Puerto Ricans who self-identify as White.

Taíno

TainoTaínosTaíno people
Recent studies in population genetics have concluded that Puerto Rican gene pool is on average predominantly European, with a significant Sub-Saharan African, Guanche and Indigenous American substrate, the latter two originating in the aboriginal people of the Canary Islands and Puerto Rico's pre-Hispanic Taíno inhabitants, respectively.
Groups of people currently identify as Taíno, most notably among the Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Jamaicans, and Dominicans, both on the islands and on United States mainland.

Territories of the United States

territoriesU.S. territoriesterritory
Puerto Ricans (Puertorriqueños; or boricuas) are the people of Puerto Rico, the inhabitants, and citizens of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (a United States territory), and their descendants.
In 2017, Puerto Rico's population was 99.0% Hispanic or Latino (including 95.8% Puerto Rican), and 68.9% white.

German immigration to Puerto Rico

GermanyGermanGermans
When Spain revived the Royal Decree of Graces of 1815 with the intention of attracting non-Hispanics to settle in the island, thousands of Corsicans (though the island was French since 1768 the population spoke an Italian dialect similar to Tuscan Italian) during the 19th century immigrated to Puerto Rico, along with German immigrants as well as Irish immigrants who were affected by the Irish Potato Famine of the 1840s, immigrated to Puerto Rico.
Many soldiers of German-American background stationed in the island upon encountering Puerto Ricans of German ancestry quickly made social contact with them.

Irish immigration to Puerto Rico

IrelandIrishIrish immigrants
When Spain revived the Royal Decree of Graces of 1815 with the intention of attracting non-Hispanics to settle in the island, thousands of Corsicans (though the island was French since 1768 the population spoke an Italian dialect similar to Tuscan Italian) during the 19th century immigrated to Puerto Rico, along with German immigrants as well as Irish immigrants who were affected by the Irish Potato Famine of the 1840s, immigrated to Puerto Rico.
This immediately led to protests from the Puerto Rican people since they had grown to respect the Irish immigrant community for their steadfast support of the island's residents.

New York (state)

New YorkNew York StateNY
Within the United States, Puerto Ricans are present in all states of the Union, and the states with the largest populations of Puerto Ricans relative to the national population of Puerto Ricans in the United States at large are the states of New York, Florida, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, with large populations also in Massachusetts, Connecticut, California, Illinois, and Texas.
Hispanic or Latino of any race were 17.6% of the population in 2010: 2.4% were of Mexican, 5.5% Puerto Rican, 0.4% Cuban, and 9.4% other Hispanic or Latino origin.

Florida

FLState of FloridaFloridian
Within the United States, Puerto Ricans are present in all states of the Union, and the states with the largest populations of Puerto Ricans relative to the national population of Puerto Ricans in the United States at large are the states of New York, Florida, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, with large populations also in Massachusetts, Connecticut, California, Illinois, and Texas.
Out of the 22.5%, the largest groups were 6.5% (1,213,438) Cuban, 4.5% (847,550) Puerto Rican, 3.3% (629,718) Mexican, and 1.6% (300,414) Colombian.

California

CAState of CaliforniaCalifornia, USA
Within the United States, Puerto Ricans are present in all states of the Union, and the states with the largest populations of Puerto Ricans relative to the national population of Puerto Ricans in the United States at large are the states of New York, Florida, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, with large populations also in Massachusetts, Connecticut, California, Illinois, and Texas.

Puerto Rican Spanish

SpanishPuerto Ricanlanguage
The Puerto Rico of today has come to form some of its own social customs, cultural matrix, historically rooted traditions, and its own unique pronunciation, vocabulary, and idiomatic expressions within the Spanish language, known as Puerto Rican Spanish.
Puerto Rican Spanish (español puertorriqueño ) is the Spanish language as characteristically spoken in Puerto Rico and by millions of people of Puerto Rican descent living in the United States and elsewhere.

White people

whitewhitesCaucasian
In the 1899 census, one year after the U.S invaded and took control of the island, 61.8% of the people self-identified as White.

Culture of Puerto Rico

Puerto Rican culturePuerto Ricanculture
The culture held in common by most Puerto Ricans is referred to as mainstream Puerto Rican culture, a Western culture largely derived from the traditions of Spain, and more specifically Andalusia and the Canary Islands.

Puerto Ricans in World War I

World War IEncarnación CorreaFirst World War
Puerto Ricans have fully participated in all U.S. wars and military conflicts since 1898, such as World War I, World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Gulf War, the War in Afghanistan, and the Iraq War.
Puerto Ricans and people of Puerto Rican descent have participated as members of the United States Armed Forces in every conflict in which the United States has been involved since World War I.

Puerto Ricans in World War II

World War IImany native Puerto Ricans foughtMost decorated Hispanic soldier of WW II
Puerto Ricans have fully participated in all U.S. wars and military conflicts since 1898, such as World War I, World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Gulf War, the War in Afghanistan, and the Iraq War.
Puerto Ricans and people of Puerto Rican descent have participated as members of the United States Armed Forces in every conflict in which the United States has been involved since World War I.

65th Infantry Regiment

65th Infantry65th Infantry Regiment (United States)65th
Puerto Ricans have fully participated in all U.S. wars and military conflicts since 1898, such as World War I, World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Gulf War, the War in Afghanistan, and the Iraq War.
The 65th Infantry Regiment, nicknamed "The Borinqueneers" from the original Taíno name of the island (Borinquen), is a Puerto Rican regiment of the United States Army.

Puerto Ricans in the Vietnam War

Vietnam War
Puerto Ricans have fully participated in all U.S. wars and military conflicts since 1898, such as World War I, World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Gulf War, the War in Afghanistan, and the Iraq War.
Commencing with World War I, Puerto Ricans and people of Puerto Rican descent have participated as members of the United States Armed Forces in every conflict in which the United States has been involved.

History of women in Puerto Rico

Women in Puerto RicoPuerto Rican womencontributions of the Puerto Rican women
After Puerto Rico was ceded to the United States in 1898 as a result of the Spanish–American War, women once again played an integral role in Puerto Rican society by contributing to the establishment of the University of Puerto Rico, women's suffrage, women's rights, civil rights, and to the military of the United States.

List of Puerto Ricans

List of notable Puerto RicansList of Puerto Ricans – GovernorsPuerto Rican
This is a list of notable people from Puerto Rico which includes people who were born in Puerto Rico (Borinquen) and people who are of full or partial Puerto Rican descent.

Political status of Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico's political statuscurrent political status of Puerto Ricoits political status
Since 1953, the UN has been considering the political status of Puerto Rico and how to assist it in achieving "independence" or "decolonization".
American and Puerto Rican political activities regarding the status question have revolved around three sets of initiatives: presidential executive orders, bills in the U.S. Congress, and referenda held in Puerto Rico.

Afro-Puerto Ricans

Afro-Puerto RicanBlack history in Puerto RicoAfrican immigration to Puerto Rico
Puerto Rico has also been influenced by African culture, Afro-Puerto Ricans being a significant minority.

Puerto Ricans in New York City

Puerto Rican migration to New YorkPuerto RicanPuerto Rican migration to New York City
Puerto Ricans have both immigrated and migrated to New York City.

Flag of Puerto Rico

Puerto Rican flagPuerto RicoRevolutionary Flag of Lares
The flag of Puerto Rico (Bandera de Puerto Rico) represents and symbolizes the island of Puerto Rico and its people.

Puerto Rico

Puerto RicanCommonwealth of Puerto RicoPuerto Rica
Puerto Ricans (Puertorriqueños; or boricuas) are the people of Puerto Rico, the inhabitants, and citizens of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (a United States territory), and their descendants.
Puerto Ricans have been citizens of the United States since 1917, and can move freely between the island and the mainland.

Puerto Rican citizenship

Puerto Ricancitizens of Puerto RicoPuerto Rican citizens
On November 18, 1997, the Supreme Court of Puerto Rico, through its ruling in Miriam J. Ramirez de Ferrer v. Juan Mari Brás, reaffirmed the standing existence of the Puerto Rican citizenship, and on October 25, 2006, Puerto Rican Socialist Party president Juan Mari Brás became the first person to receive a Puerto Rican citizenship certificate from the Puerto Rico Department of State.