Pukapuka

Danger IslandPuka Puka Pukapuka DangerPukapuka Island
Pukapuka, formerly Danger Island, is a coral atoll in the northern group of the Cook Islands in the Pacific Ocean.wikipedia
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Cook Islands

Cook IslandCookThe Cook Islands
Pukapuka, formerly Danger Island, is a coral atoll in the northern group of the Cook Islands in the Pacific Ocean.
The first written record came in 1595 when the island of Pukapuka was sighted by Spanish sailor Álvaro de Mendaña de Neira, who gave it the name San Bernardo (Saint Bernard).

Nassau (Cook Islands)

NassauNassau Island
About 60 km away is Nassau (Cook Islands) which is owned by the people of Pukapuka and considered part of it for administrative purposes.
Located 90 km south of Pukapuka, the small island (0.5 mi²/1.3 km²) of Nassau is just 9 metres (28 feet) above sea level, with an oval sandy cay on a coral reef foundation and is surrounded by a narrow reef flat.

Rarotonga

RaratongaRarotonga, Cook IslandsTe Au O Tonga
It is one of most remote islands of the Cook Islands, situated about 1,140 km northwest of Rarotonga.
Air Rarotonga operates domestic inter-island flights: daily flights to Aitutaki, regular flights to Atiu, Mangaia, Mauke and Mitiaro, and occasional flights to the remote northern atolls of Manihiki, Tongareva (Penrhyn) and Pukapuka.

Tema Reef

Tima Reef
The submerged Tima Reef is situated 23 km southeast of Pukapuka.
Tema Reef, also called Tima Reef, is a submerged coral reef in the northern Cook Islands, 23 km southeast of Pukapuka.

Air Rarotonga

The five-hour flight from Rarotonga via Air Rarotonga now operates when there is a Government charter once every six weeks or so.

Pierre François Péron

Thirty years later, Pukapuka was given the name "Isles de la Loutre" (Isles of the Otter) by Pierre François Péron, a French adventurer who was acting as first mate on board the American merchant ship, (Captain Ebenezer Dorr) after it was sighted on 3 April 1796.
After sighting Niue, the Otter reached Pukapuka on 3 April 1796.

Pukapukan language

PukapukanPukapukaits own language
Pukapuka has its own language and customs that are different from those of the rest of the Cook Islands.
Pukapukan is a Polynesian language that developed in isolation on the island of Pukapuka in the northern group of the Cook Islands.

John Williams (ship)

John Williams
The London Missionary Society barque John Williams was wrecked on the western side in May 1864.
She sank in 50 fathoms after drifting onto a reef at Danger Island (Pukapuka) on 16 May 1864.

Against the Sun

Their story was told in the book The Raft by Robert Trumbull, published by Henry Holt and Co. in 1942, and released as a motion picture Against the Sun in 2014.
Surviving on rainwater and meager rations the men drifted for 34 days and travelled over 1,000 miles, before landing on the Pukapuka atoll, a friendly island.

Cyclone Percy

Percy2005's Cyclone PercySevere Tropical Cyclone Percy
Pukapuka was hit by Cyclone Percy in February 2005 — a Category Five cyclone that destroyed the taro gardens, brought down thousands of trees, and damaged three-quarters of the houses.
Forecasters predicted that Cyclone Percy was going to turn to the southeast and hit the islands of Pukapuka and Nassau directly.

Cook Islands–United States Maritime Boundary Treaty

a treatyCook Islands – United States Maritime Boundary Treatyrecognized the sovereignty
On 11 June 1980, in connection with establishing the maritime boundary between the Cook Islands and American Samoa, the United States signed Cook Islands – United States Maritime Boundary Treaty acknowledging that Pukapuka was under Cook Islands sovereignty.
First, the United States recognised the Cook Islands' sovereignty over the islands of Pukapuka, Manihiki, Rakahanga, and Penrhyn.

Robert Dean Frisbie

R.D. Frisbie
The American writer Robert Dean Frisbie settled on Pukapuka in 1924 and wrote books about it.
The Book of Puka Puka, published in 1929 by The Century Company, related the tale of his eternal search for solitude on the far-flung Northern Cook atoll of Pukapuka.

Atoll

coral atollatollsDarwin Point
Pukapuka, formerly Danger Island, is a coral atoll in the northern group of the Cook Islands in the Pacific Ocean.

Pacific Ocean

PacificSouth PacificWestern Pacific
Pukapuka, formerly Danger Island, is a coral atoll in the northern group of the Cook Islands in the Pacific Ocean.

Holland

DutchStates of Hollandwestern
In daily life, the islanders frequently call them Tiapani (Japan), Malike or Amelika (United States) and Ōlani (Holland) respectively.

Samoa

Western SamoaIndependent State of SamoaSamoan
The island is closer to Samoa than to the rest of the Cook Islands and transport via Samoa is becoming a preferred option for Pukapukans visiting in organised groups (tele parties) from New Zealand and Australia.

New Zealand

NZLNZKiwi
The island is closer to Samoa than to the rest of the Cook Islands and transport via Samoa is becoming a preferred option for Pukapukans visiting in organised groups (tele parties) from New Zealand and Australia.

Australia

AUSAustralianCommonwealth of Australia
The island is closer to Samoa than to the rest of the Cook Islands and transport via Samoa is becoming a preferred option for Pukapukans visiting in organised groups (tele parties) from New Zealand and Australia.

Tuvalu

Ellice IslandsElliceEllice group
Pukapukan traditions speak of frequent passages to Tuvalu, Tokelau, Niue, Tonga, Rarotonga and Tahiti, and basalt used for many of their adze blades can be geochemically traced to a quarry on Tutuila (Samoa).

Tokelau

Tokelau IslandsUnion IslandsTK
Pukapukan traditions speak of frequent passages to Tuvalu, Tokelau, Niue, Tonga, Rarotonga and Tahiti, and basalt used for many of their adze blades can be geochemically traced to a quarry on Tutuila (Samoa).

Niue

Niue IslandNiue-FekaiNiueans
Pukapukan traditions speak of frequent passages to Tuvalu, Tokelau, Niue, Tonga, Rarotonga and Tahiti, and basalt used for many of their adze blades can be geochemically traced to a quarry on Tutuila (Samoa).

Tonga

Kingdom of TongaFriendly IslandsTongan
Pukapukan traditions speak of frequent passages to Tuvalu, Tokelau, Niue, Tonga, Rarotonga and Tahiti, and basalt used for many of their adze blades can be geochemically traced to a quarry on Tutuila (Samoa).