Pulmonary artery

pulmonary arteriespulmonary trunkpulmonarypulmonary artery pressureleft pulmonary arteryright pulmonary arterymain pulmonary arteryarteriesarteries of the lungartery
A pulmonary artery is an artery in the pulmonary circulation that carries deoxygenated blood from the right side of the heart to the lungs.wikipedia
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Artery

arteriesarterialarterial system
A pulmonary artery is an artery in the pulmonary circulation that carries deoxygenated blood from the right side of the heart to the lungs.
Most arteries carry oxygenated blood; the two exceptions are the pulmonary and the umbilical arteries, which carry deoxygenated blood to the organs that oxygenate it. The effective arterial blood volume is that extracellular fluid which fills the arterial system.

Pulmonary circulation

pulmonary vesselspulmonary circuitalveolar capillaries
A pulmonary artery is an artery in the pulmonary circulation that carries deoxygenated blood from the right side of the heart to the lungs.
The vessels of the pulmonary circulation are the pulmonary arteries and the pulmonary veins.

Heart

cardiachuman heartapex of the heart
A pulmonary artery is an artery in the pulmonary circulation that carries deoxygenated blood from the right side of the heart to the lungs.
The upper part of the heart is the attachment point for several large blood vessels—the venae cavae, aorta and pulmonary trunk.

Blood

human bloodhematologicalblood-forming
A pulmonary artery is an artery in the pulmonary circulation that carries deoxygenated blood from the right side of the heart to the lungs.
It then enters the right ventricle and is pumped through the pulmonary artery to the lungs and returns to the left atrium through the pulmonary veins.

Truncus arteriosus

The pulmonary arteries originate from the truncus arteriosus and the sixth pharyngeal arch. The swelling is known as the bulbus cordis and the upper part of this swelling develops into the truncus arteriosus The structure is ultimately mesodermal in origin.
It is an arterial trunk that originates from both ventricles of the heart that later divides into the aorta and the pulmonary trunk.

Heart development

fetal heartbeatheartbeatdeveloping heart
The truncus arteriosis is a structure that forms during the development of the heart as a successor to the conus arteriosus.
The truncus arteriosus splits into the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery.

Ductus arteriosus

ductus arteriosisductal
During early development, the ductus arteriosis connects the pulmonary trunk and the aortic arch, allowing blood to bypass the lungs.
In the developing fetus, the ductus arteriosus, also called the ductus Botalli, is a blood vessel connecting the main pulmonary artery to the proximal descending aorta.

Aorta

aorticaortic archaortic root
These progressively enlarge until the trunk splits into the aorta and pulmonary arteries.
It runs through a common pericardial sheath with the pulmonary trunk.

Ligamentum arteriosum

Above, the left main pulmonary artery is connected to the concavity of the proximal descending aorta by the ligamentum arteriosum.
On the other, inferior end, the ligamentum is attached to the top of the left pulmonary artery.

Infundibulum (heart)

conus arteriosusinfundibuluminfundibular
The truncus arteriosis is a structure that forms during the development of the heart as a successor to the conus arteriosus.
The infundibulum (also known as conus arteriosus) is a conical pouch formed from the upper and left angle of the right ventricle in the chordate heart, from which the pulmonary trunk arises.

Human embryonic development

human embryoembryogenesisdevelopment
By the third week of development, the endocardial tubes have developed a swelling in the part closest to the heart.
This will divide to form the aorta and pulmonary artery; the bulbus cordis will develop into the right (primitive) ventricle; the primitive ventricle will form the left ventricle; the primitive atrium will become the front parts of the left and right atria and their appendages, and the sinus venosus will develop into the posterior part of the right atrium, the sinoatrial node and the coronary sinus.

Atrium (heart)

right atriumatrialeft atrium
The mean pressure is typically 9 - 18 mmHg, and the wedge pressure measured in the left atrium may be 6-12mmHg.
The right atrium receives and holds deoxygenated blood from the superior vena cava, inferior vena cava, anterior cardiac veins and smallest cardiac veins and the coronary sinus, which it then sends down to the right ventricle (through the tricuspid valve) which in turn sends it to the pulmonary artery for pulmonary circulation.

Blood pressure

systolic blood pressurediastolic blood pressurearterial blood pressure
The pulmonary artery pressure (PA pressure) is a measure of the blood pressure found in the main pulmonary artery.
Normally, the pressure in the pulmonary artery is about 15 mmHg at rest.

Pulmonary embolism

pulmonary emboluspulmonary embolipulmonary thrombosis
This may occur as a result of heart problems such as heart failure, lung or airway disease such as COPD or scleroderma, or thromboembolic disease such as pulmonary embolism or emboli seen in sickle cell anaemia.
Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a blockage of an artery in the lungs by a substance that has moved from elsewhere in the body through the bloodstream (embolism).

Bronchial artery

bronchial arteriesLeft bronchial arteriesBronchial artery (rami bronchiales partis thoracicae aortae)
In contrast to the pulmonary arteries, the bronchial arteries supply nutrition to the lungs themselves.
They anastomose with the branches of the pulmonary arteries, and together, they supply the visceral pleura of the lung in the process.

Pharyngeal arch

pharyngeal archeshyoid archmandibular arch
The pulmonary arteries originate from the truncus arteriosus and the sixth pharyngeal arch.

Pulmonary artery sling

Pulmonary artery sling
Pulmonary artery sling is a rare condition in which the left pulmonary artery anomalously originates from a normally positioned right pulmonary artery.

CT scan

computed tomographyCTcomputerized tomography
As can be measured on a CT scan, a diameter of more than 29 mm diameter is often used as a cut-off to indicate pulmonary hypertension.
It employs computed tomography and an iodine based contrast agent to obtain an image of the pulmonary arteries.

Rasmussen's aneurysm

Rasmussen's aneurysm
Rasmussen's aneurysm is a pulmonary artery aneurysm associated with a cavitary lung lesion.

Bulbus cordis

conotruncal
The swelling is known as the bulbus cordis and the upper part of this swelling develops into the truncus arteriosus The structure is ultimately mesodermal in origin.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

emphysemaCOPDchronic bronchitis
This may occur as a result of heart problems such as heart failure, lung or airway disease such as COPD or scleroderma, or thromboembolic disease such as pulmonary embolism or emboli seen in sickle cell anaemia.
Both of these changes result in increased blood pressure in the pulmonary arteries, which may cause cor pulmonale.

Circulatory system

cardiovascularcirculationcardiovascular system
The circulatory system of the lungs is the portion of the cardiovascular system in which oxygen-depleted blood is pumped away from the heart, via the pulmonary artery, to the lungs and returned, oxygenated, to the heart via the pulmonary vein.

Sickle cell disease

sickle cell anemiasickle-cell diseasesickle-cell anemia
The wedge pressure may be elevated in left heart failure, mitral valve stenosis, and other conditions, such as sickle cell disease.
Pulmonary hypertension (increased pressure on the pulmonary artery) can lead to strain on the right ventricle and a risk of heart failure; typical symptoms are shortness of breath, decreased exercise tolerance, and episodes of syncope. 21% of children and 30% of adults have evidence of pulmonary hypertension when tested; this is associated with reduced walking distance and increased mortality.

Pulmonary hypertension

pulmonary arterial hypertensionpulmonary artery hypertensionprimary pulmonary hypertension
Pulmonary hypertension is used to describe an increase in the pressure of the pulmonary artery, and may be defined as a mean pulmonary artery pressure of greater than 25mmHg.
Pulmonary hypertension (PH or PHTN) is a condition of increased blood pressure within the arteries of the lungs.

Mediastinum

mediastinalposterior mediastinumanterior mediastinum
The right main pulmonary artery follows a longer and more horizontal course as it crosses the mediastinum.
the pulmonary trunk dividing into its two branches