Pulse

pulse ratepulsationheartbeatDicrotic pulsepulsationspulse examinationpulsus parvus et tardusarterial pulsationarterial pulsebeat
In medicine, a pulse represents the tactile arterial palpation of the heartbeat by trained fingertips.wikipedia
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Medicine

medicalmedical scienceclinical medicine
In medicine, a pulse represents the tactile arterial palpation of the heartbeat by trained fingertips.

Palpation

palpablepalpatedpalpate
In medicine, a pulse represents the tactile arterial palpation of the heartbeat by trained fingertips. The pulse deficit (difference between heart beats and pulsations at the periphery) is determined by simultaneous palpation at the radial artery and auscultation at the PMI, near the heart apex.
Examples include pulses, abdominal distension, cardiac thrills, fremitus, and various hernias, joint dislocations, bone fractures, and tumors, among others.

Heart rate

heartbeatresting heart ratemaximum heart rate
The heart rate may be greater or lesser than the pulse rate depending upon physiologic demand.
It is usually equal or close to the pulse measured at any peripheral point.

Apex beat

point of maximal impulseapical impulseat the PMI, near the heart apex
The pulse deficit (difference between heart beats and pulsations at the periphery) is determined by simultaneous palpation at the radial artery and auscultation at the PMI, near the heart apex.
ictus cordis), also called the apical impulse, is the pulse felt at the point of maximum impulse (PMI), which is the point on the precordium farthest outwards (laterally) and downwards (inferiorly) from the sternum at which the cardiac impulse can be felt.

Artery

arteriesarterialarterial system
In medicine, a pulse represents the tactile arterial palpation of the heartbeat by trained fingertips. The pulse may be palpated in any place that allows an artery to be compressed near the surface of the body, such as at the neck (carotid artery), wrist (radial artery), at the groin (femoral artery), behind the knee (popliteal artery), near the ankle joint (posterior tibial artery), and on foot (dorsalis pedis artery).
The variation in pressure produces a pulse, which can be felt in different areas of the body, such as the radial pulse.

Atrial fibrillation

atrial fibrilationparoxysmal atrial fibrillationAtrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular response
It may be present in case of premature beats or atrial fibrillation. An irregular pulse may be due to sinus arrhythmia, ectopic beats, atrial fibrillation, paroxysmal atrial tachycardia, atrial flutter, partial heart block etc. Intermittent dropping out of beats at pulse is called "intermittent pulse".
A diagnosis is made by feeling the pulse and may be confirmed using an electrocardiogram (ECG).

Physiology

physiologistphysiologicalphysiologically
Claudius Galen was perhaps the first physiologist to describe the pulse.
Santorio Santorio in 1610s was the first to use a device to measure the pulse rate (the pulsilogium), and a thermoscope to measure temperature.

Dorsalis pedis artery

dorsalis pedisarteria dorsalis pedisdorsalis pedis arteries
The pulse may be palpated in any place that allows an artery to be compressed near the surface of the body, such as at the neck (carotid artery), wrist (radial artery), at the groin (femoral artery), behind the knee (popliteal artery), near the ankle joint (posterior tibial artery), and on foot (dorsalis pedis artery).
The dorsalis pedis artery pulse can be palpated readily lateral to the extensor hallucis longus tendon (or medially to the extensor digitorum longus tendon) on the dorsal surface of the foot, distal to the dorsal most prominence of the navicular bone which serves as a reliable landmark for palpation.

Posterior tibial artery

posterior tibialposterior tibial arteriestibial
The pulse may be palpated in any place that allows an artery to be compressed near the surface of the body, such as at the neck (carotid artery), wrist (radial artery), at the groin (femoral artery), behind the knee (popliteal artery), near the ankle joint (posterior tibial artery), and on foot (dorsalis pedis artery).
The posterior tibial artery pulse can be readily palpated halfway between the posterior border of the medial malleolus and the achilles tendon and is often examined by physicians when assessing a patient for peripheral vascular disease.

Systole

systolicsystolic pressureventricular systole
The pulse is an expedient tactile method of determination of systolic blood pressure to a trained observer.
Ventricular systole is the origin of the pulse.

Pulse oximetry

pulse oximeteroximetryoximeter
Applied capture of variances of light signal from the blood component hemoglobin under oxygenated vs. deoxygenated conditions allows the technology of pulse oximetry.
It stores and records both pulse rate and SpO2 in 1 second intervals and has been shown in one study to help to detect sleep disordered breathing in surgical patients.

Collapsing pulse

bounding pulseCorrigan's pulseWater hammer pulse
Watson's water hammer pulse, also known as Corrigan's pulse or collapsing pulse, is the medical sign which describes a pulse that is bounding and forceful, rapidly increasing and subsequently collapsing, as if it were the sound of a waterhammer that was causing the pulse.

Pulse pressure

arterial Pulse Pressure
A weak pulse signifies narrow pulse pressure.
Usually, the resting pulse pressure in healthy adults, sitting position, is about 30–40 mmHg.

Atrial tachycardia

Paroxysmal atrial tachycardiaEctopic atrial tachycardiafocal atrial tachycardia
An irregular pulse may be due to sinus arrhythmia, ectopic beats, atrial fibrillation, paroxysmal atrial tachycardia, atrial flutter, partial heart block etc. Intermittent dropping out of beats at pulse is called "intermittent pulse".
Atrial tachycardias can exhibit very regular (consistent) heart rates ranging typically from 140 to 220 beats per minute.

Tachycardia

fast heart rateincreased heart raterapid heart rate
In general, a resting heart rate over 100 beats per minute is accepted as tachycardia in adults.

Pulsus paradoxus

paradoxical pulse
Pulsus paradoxus, also paradoxic pulse or paradoxical pulse, is an abnormally large decrease in stroke volume, systolic blood pressure and pulse wave amplitude during inspiration.

Hyperdynamic circulation

Systemic vasodilation and the associated decrease in peripheral vascular resistance results in decreased pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and decreased blood pressure, presenting usually with a collapsing pulse, but sometimes a bounding pulse.

Ischemia

ischemicischaemiaischaemic
Clinical manifestations of acute limb ischemia (which can be summarized as the "six P's") include pain, pallor, pulseless, paresthesia, paralysis, and poikilothermia.

Superficial temporal artery

temporal arterysuperficial temporalfrontal branch
Its pulse can be felt above the zygomatic arch, above and in front of the tragus of the ear.

Pendulum

pendulumssimple pendulumpendula
The first person to accurately measure the pulse rate was Santorio Santorii who invented the pulsilogium, a form of pendulum, based on the work by Galileo Galilei.
His physician friend, Santorio Santorii, invented a device which measured a patient's pulse by the length of a pendulum; the pulsilogium.

Pulsus bigeminus

Examples of regular intermittent (regularly irregular) pulse include pulsus bigeminus, second-degree atrioventricular block.

Brachial artery

brachialbrachial arteriesbrachioradial artery
The pulse of the brachial artery is palpable on the anterior aspect of the elbow, medial to the tendon of the biceps, and, with the use of a stethoscope and sphygmomanometer (blood pressure cuff) often used to measure the blood pressure.

Takayasu's arteritis

Takayasu arteritisAortic arch syndromeTakayasu
It may be due to low cardiac output (as seen in shock, congestive cardiac failure), hypovolemia, valvular heart disease (such as aortic outflow tract obstruction, mitral stenosis, aortic arch syndrome) etc.
Onishi and Kagoshima) reported similar eye findings in individuals whose wrist pulses were absent.

Aortic stenosis

aortic valve stenosisaorticstenosis
It may be due to low cardiac output (as seen in shock, congestive cardiac failure), hypovolemia, valvular heart disease (such as aortic outflow tract obstruction, mitral stenosis, aortic arch syndrome) etc.
This is sometimes referred to as pulsus parvus et tardus.

Santorio Santorio

SanctoriusSantorio SanctoriusSantorio Santorii
The first person to accurately measure the pulse rate was Santorio Santorii who invented the pulsilogium, a form of pendulum, based on the work by Galileo Galilei.
Santorio was the first to use a wind gauge, a water current meter, the pulsilogium (a device used to measure the pulse rate), and a thermoscope.