Pyotr Pavlenko

War correspondent Pyotr Andreyevich Pavlenko
Pyotr Andreyevich Pavlenko, (born July 11, 1899, in St. Petersburg; died June 16, 1951, in Moscow), was a Soviet writer, screenwriter and war correspondent.wikipedia
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Alexander Nevsky (film)

Alexander NevskyAleksandr NevskyAlexander Nevsky'' (film)
This was Alexander Nevsky (1938; State Prize of the USSR, 1941).
Eisenstein made the film in association with Dmitri Vasilyev and with a script co-written with Pyotr Pavlenko; they were assigned to ensure that Eisenstein did not stray into "formalism" and to facilitate shooting on a reasonable timetable.

The Fall of Berlin (film)

The Fall of BerlinFall of BerlinPád Berlína
In collaboration with Mikheil Chiaureli, Pavlenko wrote the scripts for the films The Vow (1946; State Prize of the USSR, 1947) and The Fall of Berlin (1949; State Prize of the USSR, 1950).
The script was written by Pyotr Pavlenko, and the musical score composed by Dmitri Shostakovich.

Sergei Eisenstein

EisensteinS.M. EisensteinEiseinstein
In 1937, when the renowned film director Sergei Eisenstein was under sustained attack by the head of the Soviet film industry, Boris Shumyatsky, Pavlenko boldly spoke up at a cinematographers'conference in Eisenstein's defence.
This time, he was assigned a co-scenarist, Pyotr Pavlenko, to bring in a completed script; professional actors to play the roles; and an assistant director, Dmitri Vasilyev, to expedite shooting.

USSR State Prize

Stalin PrizeState Prize of the USSRstate
USSR State Prize (4)
Sergei Eisenstein, Pyotr Pavlenko, Nikolai Cherkasov, and Andrei Abrikosov: film Alexander Nevsky (1938)

Great Fergana Canal

Fergana Canal
Pavlenko also collaborated with Eisenstein on a proposed sequence of three films about the Great Fergana Canal, but this project was never completed.
Russian screenwriters Pyotr Pavlenko and Sergei Eisenstein wrote a script portraying the history and construction of the Fergana Canal.

The Vow (1946 film)

The Vow1946Klyatva (The Vow)
In collaboration with Mikheil Chiaureli, Pavlenko wrote the scripts for the films The Vow (1946; State Prize of the USSR, 1947) and The Fall of Berlin (1949; State Prize of the USSR, 1950).

Medal "For the Defence of Stalingrad"

Defence of StalingradFor the Defence of Stalingrad"Medal For the Defence of Stalingrad
Medal "For the Defence of Stalingrad"
War correspondent Pyotr Andreyevich Pavlenko

Medal "For the Capture of Vienna"

Medal "For the Capture of Vienna"
War correspondent Pyotr Andreyevich Pavlenko

Medal "For the Capture of Budapest"

Medal "For the Capture of Budapest"
War Correspondent Pyotr Andreyevich Pavlenko

Medal "For the Defence of Moscow"

For the Defence of Moscow"For the Defence of MoscowFor the Defense of Moscow"
Medal "For the Defence of Moscow"
War correspondent Pyotr Andreyevich Pavlenko

Medal "For the Defence of the Caucasus"

CaucasusFor the Defence of the CaucasusFor the Defence of the Caucasus"
Medal "For the Defence of the Caucasus"
War correspondent Pyotr Andreyevich Pavlenko

Baku Polytechnicum

Baku PolytechnicTechnical College
Pavlenko studied at the Baku Polytechnic in 1919/20.

Red Army

Soviet ArmySovietSoviet troops
In 1920 he began political work in the Red Army and continued this work later in Transcaucasia.

Transcaucasia

South CaucasusTranscaucasianTranscaucasus
In 1920 he began political work in the Red Army and continued this work later in Transcaucasia.

Paris Commune

CommuneCommunardParis Commune of 1871
In the novel The Barricades (1932), which dealt with the Paris Commune of 1871, he attained the realistic technique he'd been working toward.

NKVD

Soviet intelligenceSoviet secret policesecret police
He was summoned to NKVD headquarters in May 1934 to witness the interrogation of Osip Mandelstam, who had been arrested after a police informer had heard him recite the now famous Stalin Epigram.

Osip Mandelstam

MandelstamMandelshtamOsip Mandelshtam
He was summoned to NKVD headquarters in May 1934 to witness the interrogation of Osip Mandelstam, who had been arrested after a police informer had heard him recite the now famous Stalin Epigram.

Stalin Epigram

He was summoned to NKVD headquarters in May 1934 to witness the interrogation of Osip Mandelstam, who had been arrested after a police informer had heard him recite the now famous Stalin Epigram.

Boris Pasternak

PasternakBoris '''Pasternakthe poet
His written assessment was that Mandelstam's verses - with the partial exception of his 'Ode to Stalin' - were "cold and dead" and "smelled" like the work of Boris Pasternak.

Mikhail Tukhachevsky

TukhachevskyMarshal TukhachevskyM. N. Tukhachevsky
In May 1937, Pavlenko had visited Pasternak at home to put pressure on him to sign a collective letter applauding the execution of Marshal Mikhail Tukhachevsky and other Red Army commanders, but Pasternak refused to co-operate.

Boris Shumyatsky

In 1937, when the renowned film director Sergei Eisenstein was under sustained attack by the head of the Soviet film industry, Boris Shumyatsky, Pavlenko boldly spoke up at a cinematographers'conference in Eisenstein's defence.

Ivan the Terrible

Ivan IVIvan IV, the Terrible, Grand Prince of MoscowIvan IV, the Terrible
Pavlenko was not invited to work on Eisenstein's final project, a three part life of Ivan the Terrible, and he wrote a hostile review for Pravda of Ivan Grozny (known in English as Ivan the Terrible, Part One) around the time that it was first shown, in January 1945.

Ivan the Terrible (1944 film)

Ivan the TerribleIvan the Terrible, Part IIvan the Terrible, Part One
Pavlenko was not invited to work on Eisenstein's final project, a three part life of Ivan the Terrible, and he wrote a hostile review for Pravda of Ivan Grozny (known in English as Ivan the Terrible, Part One) around the time that it was first shown, in January 1945.

Yakov Sverdlov

Sverdlov SverdlovY. Sverdlov
Pavlenko also wrote the film script for Yakov Sverdlov (1940; in collaboration with B. M. Levin).