Quadrivium

quadriviamathematicsquadrivial
The quadrivium (plural: quadrivia ) is the four subjects, or arts (namely arithmetic, geometry, music and astronomy), taught after teaching the trivium.wikipedia
169 Related Articles

Trivium

Trivium (education)classical liberal arts curriculumclassical trivium
The quadrivium (plural: quadrivia ) is the four subjects, or arts (namely arithmetic, geometry, music and astronomy), taught after teaching the trivium. Together, the trivium and the quadrivium comprised the seven liberal arts (based on thinking skills), as distinguished from the practical arts (such as medicine and architecture).
The trivium is implicit in De nuptiis Philologiae et Mercurii ("On the Marriage of Philology and Mercury") by Martianus Capella, but the term was not used until the Carolingian Renaissance, when it was coined in imitation of the earlier quadrivium.

Cassiodorus

Flavius Magnus Aurelius Cassiodorus SenatorCassiodorus SenatorCassiodorus the Younger
The word is Latin, meaning four ways, and its use for the four subjects has been attributed to Boethius or Cassiodorus in the 6th century.
The order of subjects in the second book of the Institutiones reflected what would become the Trivium and Quadrivium of medieval liberal arts: grammar, rhetoric, dialectic, arithmetic, music, geometry, and astronomy.

Boethius

Anicius Manlius Severinus BoethiusBoëthiusBoetius
The word is Latin, meaning four ways, and its use for the four subjects has been attributed to Boethius or Cassiodorus in the 6th century. The quadrivium is implicit in early Pythagorean writings and in the De nuptiis of Martianus Capella, although the term quadrivium was not used until Boethius, early in the sixth century.
Besides these advanced philosophical works, Boethius is also reported to have translated important Greek texts on the topics of the quadrivium His loose translation of Nicomachus's treatise on arithmetic (De institutione arithmetica libri duo) and his textbook on music (De institutione musica libri quinque, unfinished) contributed to medieval education.

Republic (Plato)

RepublicThe RepublicPlato's Republic
These four studies compose the secondary part of the curriculum outlined by Plato in The Republic and are described in the seventh book of that work (in the order Arithmetic, Geometry, Astronomy, Music).
This is the origin of the quadrivium: arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music.

Music

audiomusicalPop
The quadrivium consisted of arithmetic, geometry, music, and astronomy.
In Medieval times, the study of music was one of the Quadrivium of the seven Liberal Arts and considered vital to higher learning.

Theology

theologiantheologicaltheologians
In turn, the quadrivium was considered the foundation for the study of philosophy (sometimes called the "liberal art par excellence") and theology.
During the High Middle Ages, theology was therefore the ultimate subject at universities, being named "The Queen of the Sciences" and serving as the capstone to the Trivium and Quadrivium that young men were expected to study.

Classical education movement

classical educationclassicalclassical school
The term continues to be used by the Classical education movement and at the independent Oundle School, in the United Kingdom.
By the end of the 18th century, in addition to the trivium and quadrivium of the Middle Ages, the definition of a classical education embraced study of literature, poetry, drama, philosophy, history, art, and languages.

Pythagoreanism

PythagoreanPythagoreansPythagorean school
The quadrivium is implicit in early Pythagorean writings and in the De nuptiis of Martianus Capella, although the term quadrivium was not used until Boethius, early in the sixth century.
Although the concept of the quadrivium originated with Archytas in the 4th century BC and was a familiar concept among academics in the antiquity, it was attributed as Pythagorean in the 5th century by Proclus.

Liberal arts education

liberal artsliberal studiesArts
Together, the trivium and the quadrivium comprised the seven liberal arts (based on thinking skills), as distinguished from the practical arts (such as medicine and architecture).
Grammar, logic, and rhetoric were the core liberal arts (the trivium), while arithmetic, geometry, the theory of music, and astronomy were the following stage of education (as the quadrivium).

Oundle School

Oundlea substantial boarding schoolBramston
The term continues to be used by the Classical education movement and at the independent Oundle School, in the United Kingdom.
Quadrivium is also an option for pupils in the Lower Sixth to study, similar to trivium taught in the Third Form.

Medieval university

medieval universitiesuniversitiesuniversity
At many medieval universities, this would have been the course leading to the degree of Master of Arts (after the BA).
The quadrivium consisted of arithmetic, geometry, music, and astronomy.

Four arts

Four Arts of the Chinese Scholarfour cultivated artsfour essential arts

Latin

Latin languageLat.la
The word is Latin, meaning four ways, and its use for the four subjects has been attributed to Boethius or Cassiodorus in the 6th century.

Medicine

medicalmedical scienceclinical medicine
Together, the trivium and the quadrivium comprised the seven liberal arts (based on thinking skills), as distinguished from the practical arts (such as medicine and architecture).

Architecture

architecturalarchitectarchitecturally
Together, the trivium and the quadrivium comprised the seven liberal arts (based on thinking skills), as distinguished from the practical arts (such as medicine and architecture).

Arithmetic

arithmetic operationsarithmeticsarithmetic operation
The quadrivium consisted of arithmetic, geometry, music, and astronomy.

Geometry

geometricgeometricalgeometries
The quadrivium consisted of arithmetic, geometry, music, and astronomy.

Astronomy

astronomicalastronomerastronomers
The quadrivium consisted of arithmetic, geometry, music, and astronomy.

Grammar

grammaticalgrammaticallyrules of language
These followed the preparatory work of the trivium, consisting of grammar, logic, and rhetoric.

Logic

logicianlogicallogics
These followed the preparatory work of the trivium, consisting of grammar, logic, and rhetoric.

Rhetoric

rhetoricianrhetorrhetorical
These followed the preparatory work of the trivium, consisting of grammar, logic, and rhetoric.

Philosophy

philosophicalphilosopherhistory of philosophy
In turn, the quadrivium was considered the foundation for the study of philosophy (sometimes called the "liberal art par excellence") and theology.

Classical antiquity

antiquityclassicalancient
Educationally, the trivium and the quadrivium imparted to the student the seven liberal arts (essential thinking skills) of classical antiquity.

Plato

Plato's dialoguesDialogues of PlatoPlatonic dialogues
These four studies compose the secondary part of the curriculum outlined by Plato in The Republic and are described in the seventh book of that work (in the order Arithmetic, Geometry, Astronomy, Music).

Martianus Capella

MartianusCapellanCapella
The quadrivium is implicit in early Pythagorean writings and in the De nuptiis of Martianus Capella, although the term quadrivium was not used until Boethius, early in the sixth century.