Quantitative easing

credit easingQEQE3expansionary monetary policiesmonetary easingprinting more moneyproviding liquidityQE2QE2 (monetary policy)Quantitative and Qualitative Monetary Easing
Quantitative easing (QE), also known as large-scale asset purchases, is a monetary policy whereby a central bank buys predetermined amounts of government bonds or other financial assets in order to inject liquidity directly into the economy.wikipedia
247 Related Articles

Central bank

central bankscentral bankingcentral banking system
Quantitative easing (QE), also known as large-scale asset purchases, is a monetary policy whereby a central bank buys predetermined amounts of government bonds or other financial assets in order to inject liquidity directly into the economy.
The European Central Bank and The Bank of Japan whose economies are in or close to deflation, continue quantitative easing – buying securities to encourage more lending.

Monetary policy

monetarymonetary policiesexpansionary monetary policy
Quantitative easing (QE), also known as large-scale asset purchases, is a monetary policy whereby a central bank buys predetermined amounts of government bonds or other financial assets in order to inject liquidity directly into the economy. Standard central bank monetary policies are usually enacted by buying or selling government bonds on the open market to reach a desired target for the interbank interest rate.
These include credit easing, quantitative easing, forward guidance, and signaling.

Recession

economic recessioneconomic downturndepression
Quantitative easing can help bring the economy out of recession and help ensure that inflation does not fall below the central bank's inflation target.
One remedy to a liquidity trap is expanding the money supply via quantitative easing or other techniques in which money is effectively printed to purchase assets, thereby creating inflationary expectations that cause savers to begin spending again.

Monetary Policy Committee

Bank of England Act 1998MPCBank of England independence
At its meeting in November 2009, the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) voted to increase total asset purchases to £200 billion.
It is also responsible for directing other aspects of the government's monetary policy framework, such as quantitative easing and forward guidance.

Deflation

deflationarydeflationary spiralmoney supply contracted
An unconventional form of monetary policy, it is usually used when inflation is very low or negative, and standard expansionary monetary policy has become ineffective.
Thus the central bank must directly set a target for the quantity of money (called "quantitative easing") and may use extraordinary methods to increase the supply of money, e.g. purchasing financial assets of a type not usually used by the central bank as reserves (such as mortgage-backed securities).

Ben Bernanke

Ben S. BernankeBernankeBen S. Bernanke, Chairman and a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
On 19 June 2013, Ben Bernanke announced a "tapering" of some of the Fed's QE policies contingent upon continued positive economic data. In introducing [[Federal Reserve responses to the subprime crisis#Expansion of Fed Balance Sheet ("Credit easing")|the Federal Reserve's response]] to the 2008–09 financial crisis, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke distinguished the new program, which he termed "credit easing", from Japanese-style quantitative easing.
When this was considered insufficient to abate the liquidity crisis, the Fed initiated Quantitative Easing, creating $1.3 trillion from November 2008 to June 2010 and using the created money to buy financial assets from banks and from the government.

Abenomics

economic recovery planwomenomics
This policy has been named Abenomics, as a portmanteau of economic policies and Shinzō Abe, the current Prime Minister of Japan.
Specific policies include inflation targeting at a 2% annual rate, correction of the excessive yen appreciation, setting negative interest rates, radical quantitative easing, expansion of public investment, buying operations of construction bonds by Bank of Japan (BOJ), and revision of the Bank of Japan Act.

Gilt-edged securities

giltsgiltGilt-Edged Market Maker
During its QE programme, the Bank of England bought gilts from financial institutions, along with a smaller amount of relatively high-quality debt issued by private companies.
Since 2009 large quantities of gilts have been created and repurchased by the Bank of England under its policy of quantitative easing, and in recent years overseas investors have also been attracted to gilts by their "safe haven" status.

Currency war

competitive devaluationcompetitive currency devaluationdevalued their currencies
They share the argument that such actions amount to protectionism and competitive devaluation.
States engaging in possible competitive devaluation since 2010 have used a mix of policy tools, including direct government intervention, the imposition of capital controls, and, indirectly, quantitative easing.

Bank of England

The Bank of EnglandBankAsset Purchase Facility
During its QE programme, the Bank of England bought gilts from financial institutions, along with a smaller amount of relatively high-quality debt issued by private companies. A variant of QE for the people is People's Quantitative Easing, a policy proposed by Jeremy Corbyn during the 2015 Labour leadership election, which would require the Bank of England to create money to finance government investment via a National Investment Bank.
It has, since March 2009, also provided the mechanism by which the Bank's policy of quantitative easing (QE) is achieved, under the auspices of the MPC.

Excess reserves

interest on excess reservesexcess of reserve requirementsexcess reserve
This action increases the excess reserves that banks hold.

Liquidity trap

liquidity-trapslack in the economy
However, if a recession or depression continues even when a central bank has lowered interest rates to nearly zero, the central bank can no longer lower interest rates — a situation known as the liquidity trap.
They argue that, quantitative easing programs in the United States, and elsewhere, caused the prices of financial assets to rise across the board and interest rates to fall; yet, a liquidity trap cannot exist, according to the Keynesian definition, unless the prices on imperfectly safe financial assets are falling and their interest rates are rising.

Helicopter money

helicopter dropdropping money out of a helicopterhelicopter drops
Instead of buying government bonds or other securities by creating bank reserves, as the Federal Reserve and Bank of England have done, some suggest that central banks could make payments directly to households (in a similar fashion as Milton Friedman's helicopter money).
Helicopter money is a proposed unconventional monetary policy, sometimes suggested as an alternative to quantitative easing (QE) when the economy is in a liquidity trap (when interest rates near zero and the economy remains in recession).

Open market operation

open market operationsopen-market operationsbuying operations
Standard central bank monetary policies are usually enacted by buying or selling government bonds on the open market to reach a desired target for the interbank interest rate.

Financial crisis of 2007–08

financial crisis of 2007–2008global financial crisis2008 financial crisis
According to the International Monetary Fund, the US Federal Reserve System, and various other economists, quantitative easing undertaken following the global financial crisis of 2007–08 has mitigated some of the economic problems since the crisis.
It is probable, but debated, that the Federal Reserve's aggressive policy of quantitative easing spurred the partial recovery in the stock market.

Mario Draghi

In a dramatic change of policy, following the new Jackson Hole Consensus, on 22 January 2015 Mario Draghi, President of the European Central Bank, announced an "expanded asset purchase programme", where €60 billion per month of euro-area bonds from central governments, agencies and European institutions would be bought.
One commentator, Matthew Lynn, saw the ECB's injection of funds, along with Quantitative easing from the US Fed and the Asset Purchase Facility at the Bank of England, as feeding increases in oil prices in 2011 and 2012.

European Central Bank

ECBThe European Central Bankmonetary policy
The European Central Bank said that it would focus on buying covered bonds, a form of corporate debt.
TFEU), This prevented the ECB from implementing quantitative easing like the Federal Reserve and the Bank of England did as soon as 2008, which played an important role in stabilizing markets.

Money creation

credit creationprinting moneycreate money
However, QE is a very different form of money creation than it is commonly understood when talking about "money printing".
An extraordinary process of monetary easing is denoted as "quantitative easing", whose intent is to stimulate the economy by increasing liquidity and promoting bank lending.

Federal Reserve responses to the subprime crisis

asset purchases and other actions$700 billion bailout packagethe Federal Reserve's response
In introducing [[Federal Reserve responses to the subprime crisis#Expansion of Fed Balance Sheet ("Credit easing")|the Federal Reserve's response]] to the 2008–09 financial crisis, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke distinguished the new program, which he termed "credit easing", from Japanese-style quantitative easing.
Ben Bernanke called this approach "credit easing", possibly to distinguish it from the widely used expression Quantitative easing, which however originally also referred to the expansion of "credit creation" (reference: Richard Werner, Keizai Kyoshitsu: Keiki kaifuku, Ryoteiki kinyu kanwa kara, Nikkei, Nihon Keizai Shinbun, 2 September 1995).

People's Quantitative Easing

A variant of QE for the people is People's Quantitative Easing, a policy proposed by Jeremy Corbyn during the 2015 Labour leadership election, which would require the Bank of England to create money to finance government investment via a National Investment Bank.
Murphy argues it is a policy designed for use in 2020, in the event the economy remains flat despite traditional quantitative easing, with low inflation, low interest rates, high unemployment and low wages.

Currency War of 2009–11

While the US has taken no direct action to devalue its currency, there is close to universal consensus among analysts that its quantitative easing programmes exert downwards pressure on the dollar.

John B. Taylor

John TaylorTaylor, John B.
Economists such as John Taylor believe that quantitative easing creates unpredictability.
He cautioned that the Fed should move away from quantitative easing measures and keep to a more static, stable monetary policy.

Quantitative tightening

The policy is the reverse of quantitative easing (QE) aimed to increase money supply in order to "stimulate" the economy.

Zero interest-rate policy

Zero interest rate policyZIRPinterest rates are near zero
However, when short-term interest rates reach or approach zero, this method can no longer work.
However, some economists—such as market monetarists—believe that unconventional monetary policy such as quantitative easing can be effective at the zero lower bound.

Interest rate

interest ratesdiscount rateinterest
The BOJ had maintained short-term interest rates at close to zero since 1999.
Both the European Central Bank starting in 2014 and the Bank of Japan starting in early 2016 pursued the policy on top of their earlier and continuing quantitative easing policies.